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The plan as it stands right now is to have 6 units completely rebuilt and upgraded - these will be new to VIA. They will then be dispersed to Northern Ontario and Vancouver Island and replace the units currently in service there.

Those original units will then get cycled through IRSI and rebuilt and upgraded to the same standards. Most of those will then go back to their original homes and allow an increase of service.

Only then will the units for Southern Ontario be rebuilt. I believe that there are to be 5 sets, although admittedly I'm not sure how many exactly are to be done.

Dan

Interestingly I was reading in a branchline I just picked up that one of the RDCs for Northern Ontario is another RDC4

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Interestingly I was reading in a branchline I just picked up that one of the RDCs for Northern Ontario is another RDC4

Yup - ex CP 9251, if I'm not mistaken. It had been owned by a local railway equipment dealer and stored without trucks at Walkley Yard in Ottawa.

Dan

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Yup - ex CP 9251, if I'm not mistaken. It had been owned by a local railway equipment dealer and stored without trucks at Walkley Yard in Ottawa.

Dan

Yes, 9251. 9250 went to CRM Delson, and VIA scrapped the 9200 in the 80's. My notes indicate both the 9250 & 51 were used a bit by VIA after "amalgamation", but stored in 1981, and sold in 1986.

CRO reported it a while back, and had a shot of it in IRSI undergoing refurbishment, still in the CP colours VIA retired it in.

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Those original units will then get cycled through IRSI and rebuilt and upgraded to the same standards. Most of those will then go back to their original homes and allow an increase of service.

Only then will the units for Southern Ontario be rebuilt.

I'm struggling with the desire to yell "are you guys (VIA) *trying* to lose more money than you do already?" ;) Replace the existing stock by all means but is there really more passenger seats to be sold in White River out of incremental service than there would be in Southern Ontario? I guess I'm not as smart as the boys in Montreal...
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I'm struggling with the desire to yell "are you guys (VIA) *trying* to lose more money than you do already?" ;) Replace the existing stock by all means but is there really more passenger seats to be sold in White River out of incremental service than there would be in Southern Ontario? I guess I'm not as smart as the boys in Montreal...

Unless they are planning on moving up to daily or 6x weekly service....

Dan

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The Montreal-Quebec City train is undergoing some schedule changes, including the introduction of LRCs and rebuilt locomotives on the route.

MONTREAL, March 26, 2010 — VIA Rail Canada announced today that as of April 6, travel times on the Montreal – Quebec City route will be significantly reduced with the introduction of new schedules.

Trip times will be shortened by as much as 20 minutes, while arrival and departure times for certain trains will be changed to better suit customer needs. For example, train 21 will now leave Quebec City at 05:35 a.m., Sainte-Foy at 06:00 a.m. and arrive in Montreal at 08:32 a.m., as opposed to the current 9:17 a.m.

With the start of the new schedule, VIA will assign on this route its newest, most powerful and fuel-efficient locomotives. This will allow better acceleration and maximum possible track speeds throughout the trip.

“Our customers have told us they want faster schedules,” said VIA’s President and CEO Marc Laliberté, “and we listened. We hope these changes will help better meet their needs and attract new customers.”

Description of Montreal-Quebec train page, along with changes: http://www.viarail.ca/en/trains/ontario-an...-city/schedules

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The Montreal-Quebec City train is undergoing some schedule changes, including the introduction of LRCs and rebuilt locomotives on the route.

No word yet on whether it will actually be the rebuilds on those runs. If CN has finished the trackwork out there than 100mph operation will be reinstated, and the rebuilds will be useless.

Dan

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No word yet on whether it will actually be the rebuilds on those runs. If CN has finished the trackwork out there than 100mph operation will be reinstated, and the rebuilds will be useless.

Dan

Why would the rebuilds be useless?

Even rebuilt F40's have a maximum speed of 95 mph right? +5mph overspeed?

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Yea, unfortunately. I learned something new! Seriously...I thought it was metric.

Okay, fair enough.

If you're wondering the reason, the US railroads are still using imperial as well, and with them being the largest trading and interchange partner.....well, you get the idea.

Why would the rebuilds be useless?

Even rebuilt F40's have a maximum speed of 95 mph right? +5mph overspeed?

The rebuilds are limited to 95mph max - one of the guys on the running trades will likely have to chime in to correct me, but I believe that overspeed is a very short term thing and if not responded to by the engineer within a set amount of time will cause a penalty brake application.

The P42's are geared for 110mph, although are allowed 100mph in service.

Dan

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Okay, fair enough.

If you're wondering the reason, the US railroads are still using imperial as well, and with them being the largest trading and interchange partner.....well, you get the idea.

The rebuilds are limited to 95mph max - one of the guys on the running trades will likely have to chime in to correct me, but I believe that overspeed is a very short term thing and if not responded to by the engineer within a set amount of time will cause a penalty brake application.

The P42's are geared for 110mph, although are allowed 100mph in service.

Dan

Actually, you can hit the overspeed on a unit and it will not do anything, once you go over the overspeed setting, an alarm will sound in the cab and if nothing is done the train will go into a penalty brake application.

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Okay, fair enough.

If you're wondering the reason, the US railroads are still using imperial as well, and with them being the largest trading and interchange partner.....well, you get the idea.

The rebuilds are limited to 95mph max - one of the guys on the running trades will likely have to chime in to correct me, but I believe that overspeed is a very short term thing and if not responded to by the engineer within a set amount of time will cause a penalty brake application.

The P42's are geared for 110mph, although are allowed 100mph in service.

Dan

So... the fact that they have 100mph service will mean they are using only P42's? Do they have enough of them to go around? With the rebuilds and the fire, etc?

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So... the fact that they have 100mph service will mean they are using only P42's? Do they have enough of them to go around? With the rebuilds and the fire, etc?

There are more than enough P42s to go around. It just means that certain trains (such as 650, 69, 60 and 57) which run on longer schedules are more likely to use F40s.

Dan

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I have something in mind just now - comparing costs between VIA and GO.

Scenario 1:

A 20-year-old male and a 20 year-old female wants to go to Toronto's Union Station from the Oshawa GO Station. Both VIA and GO serve the station. They compare the costs between two services. They are considering whether to GO with VIA or with the GO train. The costs are as follows:

One-way VIA train ticket (youth from 16 to 25 years of age):

$16.00CDN (via SuperSaver fare) one-way per person

One-way GO train fare:

$8.25CDN one-way per person

While a VIA fare can be bought online, GO transit does not offer that same-level of service and therefore you have to buy a ticket from the kiosk. Is it possible that you can get VIA tickets on the day that you travel? What is difference between these two fares and how many savings these two can get if they choose GO over VIA?

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Theres a Gremlin on that train, it lives in the bathroom

The bathroom door on one side was locked the whole way. xD.

-

I'm on train #60, right now, but I can't see the car's number anywhere, right now.

It is a 41XX car, I'm sure.

I will edit the post when I get home. I will look for the number, outside.

Edit: It was 4110.

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I have something in mind just now - comparing costs between VIA and GO.

Scenario 1:

A 20-year-old male and a 20 year-old female wants to go to Toronto's Union Station from the Oshawa GO Station. Both VIA and GO serve the station. They compare the costs between two services. They are considering whether to GO with VIA or with the GO train. The costs are as follows:

One-way VIA train ticket (youth from 16 to 25 years of age):

$16.00CDN (via SuperSaver fare) one-way per person

One-way GO train fare:

$8.25CDN one-way per person

While a VIA fare can be bought online, GO transit does not offer that same-level of service and therefore you have to buy a ticket from the kiosk. Is it possible that you can get VIA tickets on the day that you travel? What is difference between these two fares and how many savings these two can get if they choose GO over VIA?

you cant get supersaver fairs day of.

if your between 18-25 you can get a youth discount which is the same as a supersaver fair day of travel.

I have gotten VIA tickets 4 minutes before the train arrives.

Go is your best bet, VIA empolyees will tell you to use GO if your are going from Oshawa to Toronto.

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