Jump to content

Failed Photos


BusRider
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Joshuamumble said:

This pole happened to be in the way so I could keep out people waiting and the front end from the shot:

Clever use of the pole. I did that once to keep the driver, who was seated in the bus, out of the photo. Kinda got in the way of the bus itself, but kept the drivers privacy. Still turned out decent enough.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Here's a bit of a baffling photo that I was wondering if someone would be able to weigh in on.

For the longest time I was an automatic brat and never gave much consideration to the technical hows-and-whys of photography: I turned on my camera and shot, and as I upgraded my cameras throughout the years, I found that the picture quality got better, but I never bothered to pay much attention to why a photo might fail or anything like that.

I only started learning manual fairly recently, and after an unfortunate occurrence with my new camera where the automatic mode most unfortunately selected a shutter speed of 1/100 for some moving photos I was trying to do of the TTC's pride bus, I have begun to watch my shutter speeds like a hawk.

Here is a photo I took yesterday. 50137482973_b5556943a5_z.jpgIMG_0749 raw by T3G, on Flickr

When zoomed out, there is nothing seriously wrong with the photo (apart from the dull colours, which I have corrected on another version of this file in DPP - the link here is unedited except to be exported as a JPG). The shutter is fast (1/1000), and ISO is low. But I find that when I zoom in on the photo to +50% or +100% to scrutinize it (as has been my practice for many years), the details seem to be sub-optimal.

SJ2P41R.png

This was shot on my 18-55 mm kit lens for a Canon SL3, so I understand that as far as lenses go this is not particularly a cream of the crop lens. However, I upgraded from a Canon Powershot SX530 HS, which should by all accounts have inferior glass when compared to even a DSLR kit lens, and at fast shutter speeds I have never encountered anything on that machine like what I encountered here. This isn't the first time this has happened on this camera, either.

The SX530 didn't have the best LCD screen, so very early on I adopted the practice of taking 2-4 photographs during a singular photo opportunity, which has saved my bacon on many occasions over the last 5 years where one shot failed, but another succeeded. It didn't occur to me before, but perhaps doing so moving forward could yield useful results, especially since moving bus photos have so many ways for things to go wrong at the best times. Even so, does anyone happen to know what caused this? Is this bad luck? Is something wrong with my settings or my lens? Any and all insights would be appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Not really a failed photo per se but I wasn't sure where else to bring this topic up.

I have become extremely conscious of the positioning of straight lines in my photos after a user on Facebook passively-aggressively reacted with sad react everytime I posted a photo that had its positioning slightly off, like this one.

16945604442_c3ac7b4594_z.jpgDPB 7120 - 04 by T3G, on Flickr

Even though I don't like his methods it has made me more conscious of trying to keep my photos straight, so the end result is, I feel, rather positive.

What I wanted to do though was to get some input on what to do when the vehicle itself is not positioned straight in relation to the rest of the world (i.e. it's on an uneven piece of road). Here is an example shot.

zpT9yIx.png

The bus looks visually perfect (to me), but the scenery in the background is wonky.

5phU9v0.png

I can, of course, rotate the photo to get the background level, but now I don't like the way the photo looks as a whole. Does anyone have any thoughts or opinions on which approach is better? I can't help but shake the feeling that even though I like the base example shot better, the impression that it gives off is one of wild unprofessionalism.

Of course, that's an example of a relatively mild contrast in scene alignment. If I had something more extreme like this (photo unfortunately not mine), I would, of course, compose the photo for the mountain in the background and not the tram.

7761-7762-na-Kr%C4%8Dacoch.jpg?243452250

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're photos are fine.  Don't think of it as wonky, but rather artistic flair.  Sometimes the strangest photos end up the most endearing because they are one of a kind. Don't apologize because something is crooked, but rather be proud of a photo that expresses what you want in it.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/17/2020 at 5:25 PM, PCC Guy said:

Not really a failed photo per se but I wasn't sure where else to bring this topic up.

I have become extremely conscious of the positioning of straight lines in my photos after a user on Facebook passively-aggressively reacted with sad react everytime I posted a photo that had its positioning slightly off, like this one.

Even though I don't like his methods it has made me more conscious of trying to keep my photos straight, so the end result is, I feel, rather positive.

What I wanted to do though was to get some input on what to do when the vehicle itself is not positioned straight in relation to the rest of the world (i.e. it's on an uneven piece of road). Here is an example shot.

The bus looks visually perfect (to me), but the scenery in the background is wonky.

I can, of course, rotate the photo to get the background level, but now I don't like the way the photo looks as a whole. Does anyone have any thoughts or opinions on which approach is better? I can't help but shake the feeling that even though I like the base example shot better, the impression that it gives off is one of wild unprofessionalism.

No one is perfect. I will slightly rotate my images if needed to straighten out the background. Depends upon the lens too. If you're shooting really wide angle you can end up with distortion too which I find can really make photos look crooked if you're not paying attention. 

Frankly, I do prefer your second image of 1297. The first image I do find it noticeable that the building doesn't have straight lines, even if the bus does. My mind tells me that the bus is on a bridge/ ramp/ incline so I'm not expecting the bus to be perfectly square in the shot. I'm not going to say I'm nitpicky over this, but, I probably am. I will correct my images, but, usually just "good enough" if it's for basic displaying on the internet.

Case in point this image from today:
DSC00512-10-19-2020.thumb.jpg.c537f4d6b33ad4b3979d990adc872a23.jpgets1073-DSC00512-10-19-2020.thumb.jpg.8e1b2c99a3fd354469b58f39bf6d3ab2.jpg
It wasn't much. I think it was 1.5 degrees. I also cropped it a bit when I rotated it. I probably spent 1 minute on, and the original image is untouched.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
  • 2 weeks later...
4 hours ago, BC_YYC said:

Some photos that came out very poorly because my iPhone wouldn’t cooperate with the night and speed of vehicles. 

 

I wish neither to be pedantic nor to defend phone cameras, but the issue that you are seeing here is less your camera refusing to cooperate, and more so that you are making a request that the camera is physically unable to complete.

A camera requires much more light under dark conditions to produce an accurately lit photo. This is achieved by one of three means: leaving the shutter open for longer (slower shutter speed; this is what is happening in your photo), opening the lens to more light (wider aperture), or increasing the sensitivity of the sensor to light (higher ISO). At night you always need to increase the parameters of all of these unless you are shooting with a tripod, and the consequence that results is your camera's shutter is open longer, causing the picture to become blurry.

There is really no way around this issue, at least not with the type of photos you are trying to shoot. There is a limit as to how wide open your lens can be, and there is a certain ISO level at which one's photos become unusable. If you are trying to shoot a moving vehicle at night, you may achieve some degree of success by attempting to pan the photo - that is, moving the camera in pace with the vehicle - and when this is successful you get a result rather like the photo that I attached below. However, this method is not fool proof, and you will fail at panning many more times than you will succeed.

Otherwise, forget about shooting moving vehicles at night. You're much better off trying to shoot them while stationary, and unless you are doing so at a well lit transit terminal you would do well to use a tripod while doing so, as it will substantially improve the quality of your photos, both in a lack of camera shake and in the fact that you are able to use a lower ISO value to achieve the same exposure (you can leave your camera shutter open for several seconds instead), leaving you with a much better quality image.

A good quality camera will come with in built image stabilization for ease of shooting at night (again, stationary objects only), without a tripod, and even an entry level DSLR should offer a high degree of image stability when this feature is employed. However, this will come with its trade offs, including in the fact that you will need to crank your ISO levels very high indeed, and unless you are shooting in a rush, during an emergency, or are otherwise physically incapable of utilizing a tripod for the job, it is not really the optimal solution.

2021-12-06_07-28-24.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, T3G said:

I wish neither to be pedantic nor to defend phone cameras, but the issue that you are seeing here is less your camera refusing to cooperate, and more so that you are making a request that the camera is physically unable to complete.

A camera requires much more light under dark conditions to produce an accurately lit photo. This is achieved by one of three means: leaving the shutter open for longer (slower shutter speed; this is what is happening in your photo), opening the lens to more light (wider aperture), or increasing the sensitivity of the sensor to light (higher ISO). At night you always need to increase the parameters of all of these unless you are shooting with a tripod, and the consequence that results is your camera's shutter is open longer, causing the picture to become blurry.

There is really no way around this issue, at least not with the type of photos you are trying to shoot. There is a limit as to how wide open your lens can be, and there is a certain ISO level at which one's photos become unusable. If you are trying to shoot a moving vehicle at night, you may achieve some degree of success by attempting to pan the photo - that is, moving the camera in pace with the vehicle - and when this is successful you get a result rather like the photo that I attached below. However, this method is not fool proof, and you will fail at panning many more times than you will succeed.

Otherwise, forget about shooting moving vehicles at night. You're much better off trying to shoot them while stationary, and unless you are doing so at a well lit transit terminal you would do well to use a tripod while doing so, as it will substantially improve the quality of your photos, both in a lack of camera shake and in the fact that you are able to use a lower ISO value to achieve the same exposure (you can leave your camera shutter open for several seconds instead), leaving you with a much better quality image.

A good quality camera will come with in built image stabilization for ease of shooting at night (again, stationary objects only), without a tripod, and even an entry level DSLR should offer a high degree of image stability when this feature is employed. However, this will come with its trade offs, including in the fact that you will need to crank your ISO levels very high indeed, and unless you are shooting in a rush, during an emergency, or are otherwise physically incapable of utilizing a tripod for the job, it is not really the optimal solution.

2021-12-06_07-28-24.jpg

I did know why my phone does that because iPhones are programmed like that it also doesn't help in one of them I was doing like 60 km/h. Thanks for the information none the less.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...