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HSR 932 is shown in the Trapeze OPS maintenance system as being "In Heavy Repair". The status has not been changed to INACTIVE at this point, so you have to assume it is still active. The $1.2 million estimate is questionable as they did not even cost that when brand new.

Sometimes, transit systems cannot officially retire a vehicle on paper until the cheque comes in from the Insurance company which can be up to 1-2 years later or more. When a bus is acquired using taxpayer funding, you have to keep it active for a set amount of time which is why you see accident buses kept on site, even though they will never see service again.

As Chris W states, please leave the Wiki updates to local people and do not rely on driver's sending you a picture. Wait until you have official confirmation from the Maintenance Department.

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15 hours ago, Thomasw said:

Before somebody undoes my edit to the wiki like last time.. 932 is officially retired! It was wrapped around a pole on the 12th during a snowstorm. I have screenshots from the operator who wrapped it around the pole. Repairs were estimated at 1.2 million so it was considered a write off.

Can I see the photos if you have them 

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41 minutes ago, HamiltonTransit1710 said:

Can I see the photos if you have them 

Not a good idea to post those kind of photos online. I posted photos like that once and a lot of people did not like that.

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17 hours ago, G.A said:

Not a good idea to post those kind of photos online. I posted photos like that once and a lot of people did not like that.

The problem is not that "people might not like that".

 

The problem is that the photos may not have been cleared to be released publicly. They may show things that shouldn't be shown to the public. They may have been sent to you by someone who is not supposed to be sending them, and so spreading them around may put them into an awkward - or worse, compromised - position. People have been fired for this kind of thing.

 

Unless you have been given explicit permission to share them, the best thing to do is not to.

 

Dan

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25 minutes ago, smallspy said:

The problem is not that "people might not like that".

 

The problem is that the photos may not have been cleared to be released publicly. They may show things that shouldn't be shown to the public. They may have been sent to you by someone who is not supposed to be sending them, and so spreading them around may put them into an awkward - or worse, compromised - position. People have been fired for this kind of thing.

 

Unless you have been given explicit permission to share them, the best thing to do is not to.

 

Dan

I took the photos myself of a simple little accident (not the one in Hamilton). But yes I understood that case about 15 years ago. This is the most valid point that I've seen today. And yes I am able to release the photos now publicly but just choose not to.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

What exactly makes the natural gas renewable, as it all comes from underground no?  If it is methane captured from a land fill, then an argument could be made.  Is it called renewable due to carbon offsets, then its not really renewable

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3 hours ago, Benton Harper said:

What exactly makes the natural gas renewable, as it all comes from underground no?  If it is methane captured from a land fill, then an argument could be made.  Is it called renewable due to carbon offsets, then its not really renewable

From the linked article: It's not fossil fuel gas from the ground, but waste gas, as you eluded.

Quote

RNG vehicle fuel is upgraded biogas; the gaseous product of the decomposition of organic waste from homes and businesses that has been processed into green fuel. This green HSR bus operates with carbon-negative RNG—fuel that goes beyond net-zero—provided from the StormFisher facility in London, Ontario, creating a circular economy in the province; achieving climate change targets, diverting waste from landfills, and supporting economic development, all while decreasing CO2 emissions and providing transit customers with comfort and reliability.

 

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2 hours ago, Vekoma said:

From the linked article: It's not fossil fuel gas from the ground, but waste gas, as you eluded.

 

Yup, that's exactly what I was saying, it's not CNG or LPG or whatever form of natural gas we are used to for the last 100+/-  years, but rather some clever rebranding...

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15 hours ago, Benton Harper said:

What exactly makes the natural gas renewable, as it all comes from underground no?  If it is methane captured from a land fill, then an argument could be made.  Is it called renewable due to carbon offsets, then its not really renewable

As stated when you click on the article, HSR is the first system in Ontario to use RNG but not the first in Canada.

Coast Mountain Bus Company in Vancouver implemented a similar program in April 2019 becoming the first system in Canada.

https://www.canadianbiomassmagazine.ca/fortisbc-partners-with-translink-to-provide-rng-for-bus-fleet-7360/

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Regarding the RNG news, does this mean that 1821 would have undergone some retrofitting to use that fuel or does it just go right into the existing engine like the CNG did? Is this a pilot project that could be rolled out to the rest of the CNG buses down the line or just a PR thing?

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With the 13 buses pending approval by Hamilton City Council, would they be automatically CNG, or would these be hybird? 
Related, wasn't it not too long ago that the HSR stopping participating in the Merolinx Consortium after the last order of CNG Novas?

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6 minutes ago, newflyerinvero said:

With the 13 buses pending approval by Hamilton City Council, would they be automatically CNG, or would these be hybird? 
Related, wasn't it not too long ago that the HSR stopping participating in the Merolinx Consortium after the last order of CNG Novas?

They would be CNG. They are going for an all CNG fleet. Unless that has changed.

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4 hours ago, Wonka said:

Regarding the RNG news, does this mean that 1821 would have undergone some retrofitting to use that fuel or does it just go right into the existing engine like the CNG did? Is this a pilot project that could be rolled out to the rest of the CNG buses down the line or just a PR thing?

My understanding of the logistics is that this is nothing more than a contact to subsidize the the cost of introducing the equivalent amount of digester gas into the consumer grid elsewhere, as this bus is going to consume. The bus itself will be fuelled out of the same infrastructure it always has. Toronto has been doing this on larger scale on the waste collection fleet for at least a decade now.

The natural gas network is a fungible system, in much the same way as the electrical grid.

RNG is dewatered, filtered methane, chemically indistinguishable from fossil methane. The only difference is the age of the molecule.  Sorry to say, the wrap is just a marketing wank.

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On 3/6/2021 at 6:20 PM, newflyerinvero said:

With the 13 buses pending approval by Hamilton City Council, would they be automatically CNG, or would these be hybird? 
Related, wasn't it not too long ago that the HSR stopping participating in the Merolinx Consortium after the last order of CNG Novas?

HSR is still participating in the Metrolinx consortium. There was talk that they were thinking of getting out, but they decided to remain in the consortium.

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On 3/6/2021 at 6:02 PM, Bus_Medic said:

My understanding of the logistics is that this is nothing more than a contact to subsidize the the cost of introducing the equivalent amount of digester gas into the consumer grid elsewhere, as this bus is going to consume. The bus itself will be fuelled out of the same infrastructure it always has. Toronto has been doing this on larger scale on the waste collection fleet for at least a decade now.

The natural gas network is a fungible system, in much the same way as the electrical grid.

RNG is dewatered, filtered methane, chemically indistinguishable from fossil methane. The only difference is the age of the molecule.  Sorry to say, the wrap is just a marketing wank.

Best description/explanation out there.  Marketing at it's best 👍

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10 hours ago, Seashore_518203 said:

HSR is still participating in the Metrolinx consortium. There was talk that they were thinking of getting out, but they decided to remain in the consortium.

I've been hearing the costs of staying vs. leaving the consortium are almost negligible, and the "significant" savings arent being realized due to the HSR's choice of going with CNG over diesel.

Which leads to the question of why the hell not just leave the consortium, especially if one keeps discovering issues with certain aspects of the buses to which the HSR could otherwise swap out if they were out of the consortium (ie: Air Conditioning).

Hamilton likes to talk a good game about improving service in the city but as long as they remain in the consortium, they are tied to whenever Metrolinx is scheduled to place an order and ultimately service will never improve significantly.

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20 hours ago, CLRV4094 said:

There has been a lot of 40 foots showing up on artic routes as of late. Does anyone know if there is some sort of shortage of artics?

 

A lot of artics have been redeployed to busy routes like 2 Barton and 44 Rymal since covid started to address social distancing issues. Since theres only so many to go around, I'd imagine this is why we're seeing more 40 foot trips on routes where you'd normally see them confined to.

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19 minutes ago, Wonka said:

 

A lot of artics have been redeployed to busy routes like 2 Barton and 44 Rymal since covid started to address social distancing issues. Since theres only so many to go around, I'd imagine this is why we're seeing more 40 foot trips on routes where you'd normally see them confined to.

I figured that too considering what is happening out there and the need for artics on the Barton especially for social distancing reasons that was why, but was wondering as I've been seeing 40 foots a lot on the various artic routes.

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26 minutes ago, Wonka said:

 

A lot of artics have been redeployed to busy routes like 2 Barton and 44 Rymal since covid started to address social distancing issues. Since theres only so many to go around, I'd imagine this is why we're seeing more 40 foot trips on routes where you'd normally see them confined to.

From my understanding, there are certain runs that aren’t getting artics for the reasons Wonka mentioned, and, also, depending on the finish time of the run. If there’s a B-Line that ends at 1830, they may assign it a 40-footer and give the 60-footer to a Barton run. 
 

They’ve been able to reassign some artics from BLine because McMaster is also closed. 


 

AM/PM tripper pieces usually get 40ft buses. Runs like Upper James, for example, are getting 40ft buses because Mohawk is closed(interlined with the 35). 
 

The artics are becoming permanent on Barton as well, even after the pandemic. 
 


 

 

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2 minutes ago, JRM1000 said:

From my understanding, there are certain runs that aren’t getting artics for the reasons Wonka mentioned, and, also, depending on the finish time of the run. 
 

AM/PM tripper pieces usually get 40ft buses. Runs like Upper James, for example, are getting 40ft buses because Mohawk is closed(interlined with the 35). 
 

The artics are becoming permanent on Barton as well, even after the pandemic. 
 


 

 

Glad to here the Barton is getting them permanently, it's long overdue on there, pandemic and even before the pandemic it was needed. And yes a lot of the tripper runs have 40 foots as opposed to all day runs along the said routes, but it depends usually.

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