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Hybrid0920
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I am - that's the issue in my case. If I was just trying to get to a location near the college, everything would be fine. There is another route I can take, but it involves a walk of 15 minutes. Not bad if the weather is nice and I don't have anything to carry. Otherwise, it's a pain.

I guess a lot of what I am saying is that transit is supposed to be about moving people from A to B, not about turning a profit. If it were, either the private sector would be falling over itself to operate transit systems, or we would have far less service as only the 'profitable' routes would remain. So if there is a lot of demand on a particular route, then improvements seem warranted. But as I am unfamiliar with the U-Pass in Hamilton, I am not sure how that would effect the service from a cost prospective - although having articulated buses only during the day would help - although like I said, the HSR will run articulated buses on the route in the evening when they are not required.

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I am not sure how that would effect the service from a cost prospective - although having articulated buses only during the day would help - although like I said, the HSR will run articulated buses on the route in the evening when they are not required.

The HSR does operate articulated buses on route 35 during the day. It is interlined with route 27 during the day. As a result, 3 out of 11 buses on the 27/35 during the peak periods are articulated buses. During the mid-day, it is 3 out of 7 buses that are articulated.

With only a limited number of artics available, the HSR tries to have the artics at the College around the start/dismissal times of classes whenever possible. Some hours it works out great, while others it does not.

As for the evening, changing those trips to 40' buses would result in the some dismissal/start trips during the day also being serviced by 40' buses.

HSR only has 25 artics. Once routes 10 and 51 have been assigned artics, it does not leave many for route 27/35. That is why it is only 3 which is better than 0.

I notice many of the buses coming down the mountain are staying in the left lane to turn into Macnab, and I guess my question is was a transit left turn signal ever considered at King/Macnab?

Of course it was thought of. Let's give staff a little credit for having brains.It was turned down by the Traffic Department.

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We will be getting a new batch of CNG artics to help with the demand. Now, they are not for the B-Line or A-Line, so I'm assuming these will be the first batch of artics with the regular paint scheme?

Why wouldn't they be in the new paint scheme? Its not like the DE60LFR's are restricted to the A/B Lines in the first place, so why would the new CNG artics be restricted to non-express routes. Im sure the new artics will be used wherever the HSR feels there is a need for them which would allow all artics to be spread across the system.

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We will be getting a new batch of CNG artics to help with the demand. Now, they are not for the B-Line or A-Line, so I'm assuming these will be the first batch of artics with the regular paint scheme?

On a side note, I saw an Artic running on A-Line on Thursday or Friday.

That scheme was put on them as it was the introduction to a new brand of bus to make the B-Line more recognizable and a way for more public engagement. That's my opinion but am not sure if that was the official reason. I don't anticipate these artics to be in that scheme.

Given how the HSR will be getting 24 Nova CNGs rather then 17 for next year, to me this could be 7 expansion buses after eliminating all of the 2002/2003 C40LFs. Is this the case or are there retirements planned for the 0400 series of 2005-built D40LFs? Also, given that 22 CNG Novas are tentatively scheduled for 2016, (of course things change), I thought it'd only be one series of buses to be retired first (ie: 0401-0414). Maybe there's something in the plans for the short to medium term in regards to the fleet numbers.

Related, any big expansion plans in terms of routes and so on because fo teh potential for fleet expansion?

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  • 2 weeks later...

From another forum

For December 8th Public Works Meeting

Quote:
RECOMMENDATION
That the 2015 Capital budget submission for the purchase of twenty-four forty-foot Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Conventional Transit (HSR) buses including nineteen replacement buses, and five previously approved expansion buses in the total amountof $13,070,000 from NOVA bus be pre-approved and funded from the following
sources: Federal Gas Tax - $3,000,000, HSR Vehicle Replacement Reserves - $10,070,000.
Quote:
It is necessary for the Vendor (NOVA) to receive a Purchase Order as soon as possible to ensure delivery of the buses to the City in Q2/3 2015.
Quote:
RECOMMENDATION
That the upset limit of $1,000,000 (approved in Report PW11079e) for the award of a contract with Enseicom for the design, supply and installation of A & B Line Station Stops - Shelters and Amenities be increased to an upset limit of $1,400,000 funded from the Metrolinx Quick Wins Reserve #108047 and charged to Project ID 530138400
Quote:
Council on June 25, 2014, directed the General Manager, Public Works, to negotiate with Enseicom Inc., and pending negotiations, award the contract for the design, supply and installation of A & B Line Station Stops – Shelters and Amenities with an upset limit of one million dollars ($1,000,000). As such staff have negotiated with Enseicom Inc., and in order to bring the submission in line with the design typologies and ensure that all 12 locations will proceed at this time, the overall project scope and estimate of one million dollars ($1,000,000) is being recommended to be expanded to approximately one million four hundred thousand dollars ($1,400,000).

This increase in budget will ensure that all 12 locations including the Mountain Transit Center (MTC) Park and Ride lot will proceed, rather than a total of only 9 locations. The ability to complete all 12 locations rather than only 9 allows for synergies and cost efficiencies and avoids the requirement to re-issue another Request for Pre- Qualifications (RFPQ) for the remainder above one million dollars ($1,000,000).

It should be noted that phase 1 and 2 falls within the $1 million and includes the prototype location of the Mountain Transit Centre and up to 8 additional locations, but in order to complete the entire estimated roll out of all 12 locations including the MTC, phase 3 would need to proceed and therefore this request of a fund transfer is required.
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https://twitter.com/HSRTransit/status/542888634761101312

Apparently according to this tweet, Binbrook will no longer be requiring TransCab service. What this will mean for Binbrook residents is that residents will probably have to carpool to their destinations now.

Can somebody shed some light on this development?

I live in Binbrook and I have never once considered using it. The cabs are not fitted with Presto and connect into the 44 Rymal which runs on a 1/2 hourly service. I drive either to Eastgate or Lime Ridge when I want to take a bus. My most recent trips are 25 to Hamilton GO and then GO 16 to Union and return. GO 16 runs more frequently than HSR 44. Just my thoughts.

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https://twitter.com/HSRTransit/status/542888634761101312

Apparently according to this tweet, Binbrook will no longer be requiring TransCab service. What this will mean for Binbrook residents is that residents will probably have to carpool to their destinations now.

Can somebody shed some light on this development?

In Hamilton, the taxpayers in each different municipality (Dundas, Ancaster, Glanbrook, etc.) are taxed for the service operated in their area through area rating. It appears on your local tax bill and there is a separate line for transit. Only residences in the transit service area see the transit levy line. This process was supposed to disappear when the greater City of Hamilton was formed in 2001 (amalgamation) but every Mayor since has failed to get rid of it.

The problem with having local municipal taxpayers only responsible for the service is that it is short sighted. The residential population have the power (through their Councillor) to determine service levels. It does not take into account people who are not residents in a specific municipality. For example, for years, the number one service request was for 5A/5C service to/from the Meadowlands on weekends. These requests always came from people who either worked there or shopped there, but did not live there. Ancaster residents, with three cars in their driveways, would complain loudly to the Councillor against any tax increase. The people who lived outside of Ancaster, but who would have used the service, had no say.

In an amalgamated city, residents should have access to all area municipalties, regardless of where they live.

For the Binbrook example, how about a person who live in upper Stoney Creek who got a job at the Shoppers Drug Mart in Binbrook? They have no say in the service because they do not live there. They will be the ones inconvenienced when the service is cancelled. Obviously people who have moved to Binbrook in the last 5-10 years did so knowing that they did not need transit. They usually have access to 2 or 3 cars and thus transit will not be successful in the short term. A long term solution is necessary where you put something in, allow people time to get used to it, allow it to develop a ridership base and then make a decision after a long trial period. One year is really not a good trial period.

In some cases, retailers need to complain loudly about service levels. They after all, are taxpayers to. The problem is that most businesses do not care about the problems their staff have getting to and from work. Walmart continues to build stores "out in the middle of nowhere" and then seems surprised when the people they hire for the jobs (paying slightly above minimum wage) have no way to get to the stores.

Hamilton continues to talk about a "liveable city", long range planning and environmental responsilbility in all their reports and documents produced. They continually fail to implement them however.

The opinions expressed above are my own. Please do not repost (to other forums) or retweet without my permission.

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^If its true that local municipal taxpayers are responsible for service levels in their area, that's extremely farsighted and unfortunate but it would explain why the HSR has various issues with service levels. For someone who comes from Toronto and the people here often complain of "divisiveness" between the old boroughs, the situation is Hamilton is much much worse. Hamilton (since amalgamation) has been designed to operate as an amalgamated city and its beyond me as to why local boroughs are essentially allowed to dictate service levels. Having a say in service levels is one thing, dictating service levels is a whole new ball game. Essentially its seems as though the HSR operates as YRT which should not be the case.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

And just like that, the geniuses (a term used very loosely by the majority of Hamiltonians) voted to kill the King Street bus lane. This is a colossal leap backwards and leads me to thinking that the Metrolinx money will be sent somewhere else like Mississauga, who don't need extra help from the province in my opinion.

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/5268708-council-votes-9-7-to-kill-bus-only-lane/

I can say that one of the councillors, Lloyd Ferguson, owns the city's taxi contract. Can you say conflict of interest?

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And just like that, the geniuses (a term used very loosely by the majority of Hamiltonians) voted to kill the King Street bus lane. This is a colossal leap backwards and leads me to thinking that the Metrolinx money will be sent somewhere else like Mississauga, who don't need extra help from the province in my opinion.

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/5268708-council-votes-9-7-to-kill-bus-only-lane/

I can say that one of the councillors, Lloyd Ferguson, owns the city's taxi contract. Can you say conflict of interest?

To be honest I dont think Hamilton will get any money from the province, since they have been the only municipality which hasn't shown a clear plan on what it wants. There has been no planning done whatsoever except for lines drawn on a map, no EA, no engineering, no anything. By the time the city ever figures things out the ship will have already sailed. Mississauga, Brampton, Vaughan, even Toronto (with it's constant bickering) are all much further ahead of the line so to speak.

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To be honest I dont think Hamilton will get any money from the province, since they have been the only municipality which hasn't shown a clear plan on what it wants. There has been no planning done whatsoever except for lines drawn on a map, no EA, no engineering, no anything. By the time the city ever figures things out the ship will have already sailed. Mississauga, Brampton, Vaughan, even Toronto (with it's constant bickering) are all much further ahead of the line so to speak.

I'm pretty sure all of that actually was done quite a long time ago and sent off to Metrolinx. The important thing that Hamilton is lacking is political championing of the LRT project. Last term's council and mayor did almost everything possible to spread misinformation and undermine the project which the province may use as an easy way out of their earlier promises. We'll probably end up with a "well you're getting 2-way, all day GO aren't you?". That project of course is already behind schedule and won't even be ready in time for the pan am games, neither will we see real 2-way, all-day service until some undetermined date into the farther future.

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The last two posts sum up the dog and pony show that is Hamilton. I'm just glad that residents are speaking with their councillors, and shaming the ones that voted against the bus lane.

Of the seven people that voted to keep the bus lane, our mayor (who unlike Bob Bratina, doesn't flip-flop on every third sentence) was one of the votes. I do however think that Chad Collins' true opposition came out in a RaiseTheHammer article published today. In it, he admitted to not reading the rapid transit report and making his mind up far before the report was released.

http://www.raisethehammer.org/article/2459/?view=flat

Hardest hit will be the operators who will take more abuse from angry customers along the corridor complaining about late vehicles. Needless to say, the citizens will have the last laugh over the bureaucrats on this. Just you watch Councillors Collins, Ferguson, Vanderbeek (who I'm ashamed to say is from my ward) and Whitehead. It will be an absolute shit-show (excuse my language) downtown once the lane is removed. Just remember this decision when operator assaults and abuse rise exponentially due in no small part to this.

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I'm pretty sure all of that actually was done quite a long time ago and sent off to Metrolinx. The important thing that Hamilton is lacking is political championing of the LRT project. Last term's council and mayor did almost everything possible to spread misinformation and undermine the project which the province may use as an easy way out of their earlier promises. We'll probably end up with a "well you're getting 2-way, all day GO aren't you?". That project of course is already behind schedule and won't even be ready in time for the pan am games, neither will we see real 2-way, all-day service until some undetermined date into the farther future.

It's too bad that all that work will most likely have to be repeated since Metrolinx will most likely not fund Hamilton's LRT due to the political games that you mentioned. The two-way GO service will be the only serious and significant investment made to Hamilton for the next 5-7 years.

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It's too bad that all that work will most likely have to be repeated since Metrolinx will most likely not fund Hamilton's LRT due to the political games that you mentioned. .

The Mayor of Hamilton is reporting that Premier Wynne has committed that they will 100% fund Hamilton's LRT. http://www.thespec.com/news-story/5276107-premier-wynne-guarantees-hamilton-lrt-funding-report/

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The Mayor of Hamilton is reporting that Premier Wynne has committed that they will 100% fund Hamilton's LRT. http://www.thespec.com/news-story/5276107-premier-wynne-guarantees-hamilton-lrt-funding-report/

We'll just have to see just how far down Hamilton is down the list of projects that will be funded. I wouldnt be surprised if there was a "first round" and "second round" of sorts, with Hamilton being in the latter list (ie: Being funded 10-15 years from now).

Some councillors are still not on board it seems: https://twitter.com/joeycoleman/status/559773384104771584

The incompetence of some counsillors is truly incredible. Even if the province said one day that they would even pay for the operating costs, these same councillors would still say no. This is Hamilton politics.

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It comes down to the fact that more than half of the council table is suburban councilors, and their constituents are mostly people who use downtown streets as a bypass, and not a destination. They aren't willing to look at these improvements as "temporary inconvenience for the overall betterment of the city", a lot of them are also not very well educated on the rapid transit plan, which is largely due to the city closing the rapid transit office a few years ago and virtually killing all public engagement. It's incredibly difficult to champion a public transit vision when most of the people in the city aside from the actual transit users know almost nothing about it, other than "it'll close lanes down and I'll be a few minutes later getting to wherever I'm going". If the LRT plan ultimately fails, it's the city's fault for dropping the ball when they should have been pushing hard this entire time. Kitchener/Waterloo, Mississauga and Toronto having been doing exactly that for a long time now.

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^I couldn't agree more with what you said. Hamilton still operates on the mentality that it isnt an amalgamated city, when the opposite is true. Many counsillors and people for that matter are oblivious to the needs in different parts of the city, and they only focus on their community instead of the city as a whole. The city is really too big for its own good.

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