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Miscellaneous TTC Discussion & Questions


Orion V
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The stop calling system has been mired in legal red tape for a few years. The TTC won the first round a few years ago and was able to update the system but this was short lived. I believe the TTC has won the second round and should be able to bring updating the system soon.

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Today,

I just saw Queensway division opetating 37 Islington

Mount Dennis operates 26 Dupont.

I think today is the day which some routes change their division

The new service summary does state it would begin on February 15, 2015. 94 and 190 are also being run by Birchmount and Eglinton today, respectively. Expect some Mount Dennis runs on 35 afternoon peak this coming Tuesday.

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Today,

I just saw Queensway division opetating 37 Islington

Mount Dennis operates 26 Dupont.

I think today is the day which some routes change their division

Yes, had a great day on the 37! Much better than 45 but I suppose the cold kept many indoors. Only picked up 2 from the casino with no money.

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Yes, had a great day on the 37! Much better than 45 but I suppose the cold kept many indoors. Only picked up 2 from the casino with no money.

I live near Islington and Eglinton.. so I use 37 very often (I'm a university student, so I always ride from Islington Station to Eglinton)

The road surface on Islington is much better than Kipling actually..

It looks like the surface was repaved for Kipling between Rathburn and Eglinton..

Yesterday, I drove through Kipling towards Rexdale and the road surface was very crappy. (Kipling always goes on the CAA list for the worst road in the GTA pretty much every single year)

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I've been reading about SCS in another thread; what happens when it's violated? Recently two trains I were riding have come to sudden hard stops, similar in strength to emergency brakes. I suspect they didn't trip a red since last time that happened to me the train was offloaded at the next station and taken out of service for investigation.

The first was barreling into St George SB and the train stopped halfway down the platform and sat there for ~30 seconds before inching fully on platform. The next was barreling NB out of Museum and stopping halfway around the curve toward St.George and the same happened, however the train proceeded normally to St.George.

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I've been reading about SCS in another thread; what happens when it's violated? Recently two trains I were riding have come to sudden hard stops, similar in strength to emergency brakes. I suspect they didn't trip a red since last time that happened to me the train was offloaded at the next station and taken out of service for investigation.

A scs violation applies the emergency brakes. There are many reasons why the train could EB, not all of them involve the scs system or a trip. Sometimes the SCS system is goofy and forgets where it is or gets confused. Tags go missing, or get misread. SCS violations include overspeeds, which happen when the driver screws up somehow, or the system gets confused.

It's hard to say what happened on the train at St. George without being there. Possibly a SCS signal violation without actually tripping the tripswitch. NB Museum could have been an overspeed. Or it could have been the operator was in traffic and didn't realize it until they came around the corner and saw no lunars and placed it in emerg in a panic because they didn't think the train would stop for the red otherwise. It could have been a full brake application with a rough stop at the end (no feathering) in that case too. There are a lot of operators that charge red signals in traffic. Bad inconsiderate habbit IMO, no concern for passenger comfort.

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That section Between Spadina and Museum is known for SCS problems. Random Error codes on the display. Apparently BD only have a hand full of trains with it working.


Question for anyone in the know: What's the purpose of guards sticking (or pointing) their finger (or couple fingers) as the train comes to a stop?

I've noticed this on the BD line only as of late.

More to do with opening the doors on the wrong side of the Platform, so its a preventative measure TTC puts in place.

**After any SCS violation (regardless if its the operators fault or not) they have to go at a restricted speed to the next signal, before resuming normal speed.


A scs violation applies the emergency brakes. There are many reasons why the train could EB, not all of them involve the scs system or a trip. Sometimes the SCS system is goofy and forgets where it is or gets confused. Tags go missing, or get misread. SCS violations include overspeeds, which happen when the driver screws up somehow, or the system gets confused.

It's hard to say what happened on the train at St. George without being there. Possibly a SCS signal violation without actually tripping the tripswitch. NB Museum could have been an overspeed. Or it could have been the operator was in traffic and didn't realize it until they came around the corner and saw no lunars and placed it in emerg in a panic because they didn't think the train would stop for the red otherwise. It could have been a full brake application with a rough stop at the end (no feathering) in that case too. There are a lot of operators that charge red signals in traffic. Bad inconsiderate habbit IMO, no concern for passenger comfort.

Especially with the TR were you have to put more effort compared to other trains in featuring the brakes. And there is an ongoing discussion on that.

If I'm hard on the brakes with a T1 or H train passengers wouldn't notice it has much. TR has this abrupt stop, it can be so sensitive. I'm surprise their hasn't been that many complaints with them, I guess passengers are use to it by now. lol

But no matter what anyone says, the TRs can have a smooth stop. You just got to put more effort into it.

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Thanks for the input you two, appreciate it.

And yes, those two stops were quite rough and threw everyone around, compared to the T1 emerg. The one from Museum couldn't have been traffic as it was late evening and was a 6 min wait for it. They were both going faster than normal though, that section Spadina to Museum is usually relatively slow.

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Thanks for the input you two, appreciate it.

And yes, those two stops were quite rough and threw everyone around, compared to the T1 emerg. The one from Museum couldn't have been traffic as it was late evening and was a 6 min wait for it. They were both going faster than normal though, that section Spadina to Museum is usually relatively slow.

I remember this happening twice to me two weeks ago. One time was between Old Mill and Royal York WB, the was traffic in the tunnel so I thought it might have ran a red or maybe this SCS stopped it.

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Especially with the TR were you have to put more effort compared to other trains in featuring the brakes. And there is an ongoing discussion on that.

If I'm hard on the brakes with a T1 or H train passengers wouldn't notice it has much. TR has this abrupt stop, it can be so sensitive. I'm surprise their hasn't been that many complaints with them, I guess passengers are use to it by now. lol

But no matter what anyone says, the TRs can have a smooth stop. You just got to put more effort into it.

I have to disagree. The brakes on the TR are far smoother than the T1, and far easier to keep smooth. On the T1, any hand movement on the controller during a brake application can lurch the train around, where the TR is just buttery smooth, unless you are really cranking it back and forth between min and full brake like some dickheads do. The little bump at the end on an unfeathered TR is nothing to the jerk you get on an unfeathered T1.

The only real issue with the brakes on a TR right now is how easy they are to get wheel slip. They are much better now than when they first got them, whatever they did to reprogram the brakes helped. Those original brakes were scary sometimes.

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Does anyone know if the weekend schedule has changed on the YUS for the new board period which began on Sunday? I'm asking because I have noticed Davisville yard was unusually empty on Sunday and was wondering if this is due to schedule changes for the Feb board period or simply ad-hoc equipment moves to deal with the frigid weather we've been having.

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Does anyone know if the weekend schedule has changed on the YUS for the new board period which began on Sunday? I'm asking because I have noticed Davisville yard was unusually empty on Sunday and was wondering if this is due to schedule changes for the Feb board period or simply ad-hoc equipment moves to deal with the frigid weather we've been having.

The stretch of track between Union and St Andrew was closed for construction, so Davisville was providing all the trains for the Yonge side of Line 1 all weekend long.

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Just going through the crew guides. Closure or no closure, trains are dispatch out of Davisville on Sundays. And Davisville doesn't provide all the trains for the Yonge side. Ops are asked to come in early to bring trains over to the Yonge side in the morning, and bring them back to Wilson at night, which I've done. Davisville brings out their normal scheduled trains out.

Trains can still travel between Union and St.Andrew through the center track, and over to the original platform, not the new platform. When the closure happens between Eglinton and Bloor, most of he trains are from the Finch Center track and 1 or 2 Davisville trains.

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Question for anyone in the know: What's the purpose of guards sticking (or pointing) their finger (or couple fingers) as the train comes to a stop?

I've noticed this on the BD line only as of late.

The train guards are asked to do this in order to ensure the train stops at the proper position at the platform to prevent the doors open prematurely (overshoot or undershoot the platform).

Global News did a story on this today:

TTC subway guards pointing at the wall. Why? Some don’t know

TORONTO – Subway door problems have led the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) to enact a safety procedure to prevent injuries and delays. Problem is, some TTC employees say they don’t understand the procedure that’s been around for almost eight months.

Most riders may not notice it, and it only happens for a second, but when the train pulls into a station, subway guards (the transit employee in the middle of the train) are required to point at a specific spot on the wall in each and every station.

So, what’s the point?

“It’s to focus the guard on the job that they’re doing, which is a safety critical task that they are going to open the doors of the train,” explained James Ross, TTC Head of Subway Transportation.

It’s step three of a four-step process dubbed the “point and acknowledge” procedure. “[The guard] has to stand up, they have to open the window, point at the marker to acknowledge they are in the right spot, and only then do they safely open the doors,” Ross said.

The markers, known as the “all train spotted marker,” are the green circles and triangles or orange triangles (depending on which Toronto subway line) located on the walls at each station.

On Saturday, half of the dozen subway guards Global News spoke to said they didn’t know why they were pointing. One even denied pointing at all, right after pointing at the marker.

“I think a lot of our staff understand the reason why they’re doing it.. I think most of them get it, and most of them see the value in it,” Ross said.

The “point and acknowledge” procedure rolled out in July 2014, Ross said. In the 26 weeks leading up to the implementation, 14 incidents of doors opening without the train fully in the station were reported, he added.

But one guard told Global News on Saturday it was only implemented in the last “few weeks”, and he didn’t know the purpose of the pointing.

Another guard, as a train rolled through Pape Station, explained the procedure had been in place for “quite some time” and it is to keep “us alert.”

This guard was positive about the program. He explained that transit employees have been doing it for a long time in New York City.

And they are.

The “point and acknowledge” concept originated in Japan (although it’s called “pointing and calling”) and was adapted by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) during the First World War.

MTA employees are required to point at the conductor’s indication board, a black and white striped wooded board, upon arrival at each station.

Since the implementation in Toronto, the TTC says there have been four door-related incidents, two of which happened shortly after the platform change at Union Station.

Ross explained door-related incidents can result in delays of up to 25 minutes on the subway system.

Clearly though, the project is still a work in progress. One guard on Wednesday appeared to be giving the finger.

Ross said the TTC has done audits on the pointing program and “overwhelmingly, we are seeing really high levels of compliance.”

The pointing system was slightly tweaked for North American transit systems, both Toronto and New York are the only ones that use the “point and acknowledge” procedure.

http://globalnews.ca/news/1841468/ttc-subway-guards-pointing-at-the-wall-why-some-dont-know/ (Click here to view the video to go along with the article).

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"I'm pointing but I don't know why, but what the hell, why not" lol.

Its funny that not everyone is the same page. one said it started a few weeks ago, one said it started back last year summer. Some know why they're doing it some don't. Some said they don't even point. TTC has a problem with everyone not being on the same page.

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I am just curious as to why the TTC painted over the "S T O P" lettering on its older bus and streetcar stops.. Some along Hullmar are still partially legible as well as the one in front of Kipling station.

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