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Of course, now that I’m not looking for them…

The things you discover in your basement while you’re reorganizing the workshop furniture.  I also lost a lot of time looking through a few blocks of slides in a filing box that I shot back in 2001.   Subway interiors.  Ex-Montreal Fishbowls including some night shots at Jane station, H4, H6, T1 trains in Old Mill station at night shot from the Bloor St bridge (that was a pain), pre-ROW St. Clair.  Buses that are long gone.

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Snazzy.

Continuing the reorganization in the basement, I demolished a big box of misc. electronics that someone gave me a year ago and put the parts cabinets on a shelf and popped the lid on a cookie tin of loose stuff. Some of its components I’m going to have to sort through, some of it’s ewaste junk, but this big surprise I was not expecting to see stuck out.

Given the context, it’s gotta be something to do with that you-can’t-do-that-complicated-electronics but specifically what and how does it pertain to streetcars specifically?

It’s a Hewlett Packard 545A logic probe.  Hook up the clip leads to the power and ground energizing the circuit you want to inspect and touch the tip to any part lead in it to see right away if it’s high, low, or floating or being pulsed.  This would be one of the period correct troubleshooting tools for poking around CLRV ECU boards to find failed parts.

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  • 2 weeks later...
6 hours ago, Tom1122 said:

4559 Seems to have weathered the collision better than 4043.

Those accidents weren't comparable. 4043 got smacked in the face, closer to 4062 or 4119 in damage, its entire right front end had sort of caved in on itself (and given the lack of visible damage on 4559 the truck was probably going far slower than what happened with 4043). There was a photo on the old board of the damage to 4043, but it looks like all the data from there has disappeared over the course of time. I wish I had thought to save it, but no such luck.

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On 11/17/2021 at 7:24 PM, T3G said:

Those accidents weren't comparable. 4043 got smacked in the face, closer to 4062 or 4119 in damage, its entire right front end had sort of caved in on itself (and given the lack of visible damage on 4559 the truck was probably going far slower than what happened with 4043). There was a photo on the old board of the damage to 4043, but it looks like all the data from there has disappeared over the course of time. I wish I had thought to save it, but no such luck.

The photos from that crash still exist in an old youtube video

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On 11/17/2021 at 4:56 PM, Tom1122 said:

4559 Seems to have weathered the collision better than 4043.

Could be some frame damage...

I once saw a DHL dodge sprinter with a huge concave circle in the middle. The guy told me that it got T boned by a streetcar. 

The frame rails on either side where touching each other. The streetcar only had a scratch. 

 

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

From the promo materials/commercials the streetcars simply read "Chintown" while some creative license was taken in depicting them.  It appears to be coming from a side street ONTO Spadina.  What's the appropriate level of realism here at least with the streetcar sign?  Using a fictitious route number with Chinatown as a destination?  I doubt there'd be greater context in the film to make Spadina (or any actual terminus point) seem relevant.  The last time we saw rollsigns without a route number was with the PCC fleet, but they were split as two exposures.

Turning Red Trailer 

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  • 5 weeks later...

Anyone know if the 60 Flexity streetcar order is firmed and contract signed?

Last I heard was the feds committed funds to it and that's it.

Any documents stating what differences this order will have vs the original 204 unit order? Eg. Will it only have panto and come only with LED interior lights.

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4 hours ago, Orion V said:

Anyone know if the 60 Flexity streetcar order is firmed and contract signed?

Last I heard was the feds committed funds to it and that's it.

Any documents stating what differences this order will have vs the original 204 unit order? Eg. Will it only have panto and come only with LED interior lights.

If you have a chance to read this month's CEO report, they talked about Canadian content of the Alstom streetcars

Quote

Canadian Content requirement for streetcar order On May 28, 2021, the TTC successfully executed a contract amendment with Alstom SA (Alstom), increasing our streetcar fleet to 264 from 204 vehicles by the end of 2024. All of Alstom’s major parts suppliers have been contracted and are currently on track to deliver on-schedule. Production at Alstom’s facilities continues to rampup and TTC staff are providing oversight to design, quality and commercial performance.

I'm not sure why you're doubting it a year later. Alstom did publish a press release regarding the order in early June.

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On 8/13/2021 at 2:21 PM, WKLis said:


In addition, the single-blade track switches are cheaper than the double-blade track switches, because of budget constraints. There is no money for public transit operations, but there is for the roads used by the single-occupant automobiles.

@WKLis is double-blade switches in the TTC capital backlog?

My estimation is the slow-downs at single-point switches is the single biggest problem with TTC streetcars. Notice how slow they go through every. single. junction?

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2 hours ago, zb553 said:

@WKLis is double-blade switches in the TTC capital backlog?

My estimation is the slow-downs at single-point switches is the single biggest problem with TTC streetcars. Notice how slow they go through every. single. junction?

Don't engage him.

 

The switches aren't the problem. The problem is with the antiquated N/A control system, along with the TTC's own reactionary measures.

 

Dan

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5 hours ago, smallspy said:

The switches aren't the problem. The problem is with the antiquated N/A control system, along with the TTC's own reactionary measures.

 

after the front of streetcar has proceeded to go straight, why is it still ordered to be slow?

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5 hours ago, zb553 said:

after the front of streetcar has proceeded to go straight, why is it still ordered to be slow?

The policy is probably there because they are afraid of drivers doing something unsafe after forgetting their vehicle’s position relative to the switch.

 

On another note, the use of single-point switches forced the TTC to procure a streetcar with solid axles, which results in an uneven floor height and additional dead space in the vehicle. Axle-less would have been preferable for the customer experience, but derailment risk at single-point switches is too high.

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7 hours ago, * Mr. Black * said:

because that is the policy. That is what TTC management wants....

Not just for safety reasons, for noise and vibrations too. A few people are professional complainers.

 

The streetcars ride up on their flanges through the trackwork, risk of derailment is higher even when going through straight. A derailment at less than 10km/h is a lot less serious.

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9 hours ago, zb553 said:

after the front of streetcar has proceeded to go straight, why is it still ordered to be slow?

There is the risk that the switch will change while the rear trucks are passing through as well.

I don't know how significant this risk is however, as there are lots of tram operations in Europe that pass through switches much faster than here. But it's the TTC's toys, so they set the rules.

 

 

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9 hours ago, zb553 said:

after the front of streetcar has proceeded to go straight, why is it still ordered to be slow?

There are two rules at play here.

 

The first is that every single car must stop in advance of and observe the direction that the switch is directed. This has to do with the N/A system.

 

The second is that all cars must not exceed 10km/h through specialwork. This has nothing to do with the single-point switches because at that point they will be trailing through them, not facing through them. It is just a silly rule that the TTC has decided to institute and enforce.

 

38 minutes ago, T3G said:

There is the risk that the switch will change while the rear trucks are passing through as well.

 

No, there isn't.

 

The one thing about the N/A system is that it includes a lockout. Once a car has been detected on the switch, the system prevents any further movement. It doesn't matter how close the trailing car will get, until it receives a signal from the end of a car the switch can't change.

 

38 minutes ago, T3G said:

I don't know how significant this risk is however, as there are lots of tram operations in Europe that pass through switches much faster than here. But it's the TTC's toys, so they set the rules.

 

In fairness, the use of the this N/A system is not widespread - I honestly don't know any other systems that use this particular system. Yes, there are other systems out there, and frankly the TTC would have done well to have replaced it with one of those modern systems years ago.


Dan

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At today's Easter Parade, 4514 and 4554 were the only TTC vehicles that were in the parade. The overhead east of Kingston Road can only accept pantographs (Why they didn't use the style like they did when 509 and 510 were first converted I don't know)

If the TTC couldn't have put any historic cars, they could have at least have brought fishbowl 2252 as a consolation vehicle.

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So it's been almost 10 years now since the first Flexity arrived. If we ignore obvious problems like the deferred delivery dates and the construction issues on the first 67 cars, has the TTC overall been satisfied with the Flexity as a product? Are they reliable enough? I know that the TRs were something of a lemon but I haven't heard anything about this being the case with the Flexitys, the various and unending construction problems seem to have been the key thing that have been kneecapping them.

How do they compare to something like the CLRV, which took ~10 or so years to iron out and get working reliably?

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7 hours ago, T3G said:

So it's been almost 10 years now since the first Flexity arrived. If we ignore obvious problems like the deferred delivery dates and the construction issues on the first 67 cars, has the TTC overall been satisfied with the Flexity as a product? Are they reliable enough? I know that the TRs were something of a lemon but I haven't heard anything about this being the case with the Flexitys, the various and unending construction problems seem to have been the key thing that have been kneecapping them.

How do they compare to something like the CLRV, which took ~10 or so years to iron out and get working reliably?

You can't really compare Flexity's with CLRVs. This is a fully computerized product unlike those mechanical workhorses. There is so much more things that can go wrong with the Flexitys. Wheelchair ramp, internal computer problems cause by loose wires and faulty electronics which didn't exist with CLRVs. Plus it's twice as long meaning more places to go wrong.

A decade or so ago, wasn't the MDBF for buses like 5,000 kilometres? Cause they are stretch thin with a 10% spare ratio and inadequate maintenance. Compare that to the Nova HEVs were are at 70,000 km right now, 14 times longer till it breaks down. If they TTC operated like that back then, those CLRVs MDBF would be much lower than if they were kept in better condition.

 

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The frame of comparison for Flexity vs. CLRV was as the replaced vs replacing generation, not as equivalent machines. No different than comparing the troubled H6s with the cars that they replaced, the Gloucesters, which were in comparison to the H6s relatively trouble free. You can acknowledge that they are different machines while trying to compare the circumstances around their debut in service and perception, etc.

I'm not sure it's accurate to say that computers (or crude versions of them, anyway) and the capacity for faulty electronics etc didn't exist on a CLRV. I am no expert on them by any means, but stuff like the equipment control unit, the semi-automatic couplers, the thermostatically operated ventilation system, spin/slide protection, jerk limit control, load weighing, no-motion relay, are all pretty foreign concepts to a PCC.

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14 hours ago, Xtrazsteve said:

You can't really compare Flexity's with CLRVs. This is a fully computerized product unlike those mechanical workhorses. There is so much more things that can go wrong with the Flexitys. Wheelchair ramp, internal computer problems cause by loose wires and faulty electronics which didn't exist with CLRVs. Plus it's twice as long meaning more places to go wrong.

A decade or so ago, wasn't the MDBF for buses like 5,000 kilometres? Cause they are stretch thin with a 10% spare ratio and inadequate maintenance. Compare that to the Nova HEVs were are at 70,000 km right now, 14 times longer till it breaks down. If they TTC operated like that back then, those CLRVs MDBF would be much lower than if they were kept in better condition.

 

I would hardly describe the CLRV as devoid of electronics, or their related headaches. Add to that the liabilities of pneumatics, which the in the flexities are conspicuously absent. 
 

The MDBF of old was below 10 000 km, largely due to the GMs being outshopped and flogged down the road for the umpeenth time. Notice a common theme there?

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