Jump to content

Streetcar News


CLRV4037
 Share

Recommended Posts

There was no way that the TTC was going to buy 4900. They didn't like the hand controls in it, and the couplers were rendered useless by the conversion of the SRT to ART. It had a non-standard articulation joint (when compared to the production ALRVs - it used an off-the-shelf unit from Europe). Hell, they had an option to pick up another 17 or so ALRVs and they didn't take it.

Dan, you are trying to be more correct than correct. We can go back and forth over whether the TTC would or wouldn't have purchased 4900 if it hadn't been involved in the accident at Kingston. However, it's still irrelevant to the question at hand which is which TTC streetcars was the first to use a pantograph which were the SIG cars which were built before 4900.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's bad, but not nearly as bad as that.

A couple of the footings underneath some of the uprights on King leg of the bridge have subsided, and over time could have allowed the bridge to shift away from its proper location. The work is to correct this, but they wanted to keep the bridge unloaded while the footings set.

Have they done the work then?

It's hard to tell from up top on the streetcar ...

That little 504 detour can add a good 5 minutes in rush hour, as the streetcar tries to go up Parliament with all the lights, and then turn onto Queen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan, you are trying to be more correct than correct. We can go back and forth over whether the TTC would or wouldn't have purchased 4900 if it hadn't been involved in the accident at Kingston. However, it's still irrelevant to the question at hand which is which TTC streetcars was the first to use a pantograph which were the SIG cars which were built before 4900.

Hey, you brought it up....

In any case, if we wish to expand it to "non-trolley pole systems", there are a few more options that we can choose from. The Y-series shunters, the large Witt that was set up for north-of-Glen-Echo service,...

Dan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as great as it is to finally see the pantographs at work, this is sadly another example of the useless wasting of money. Why did TTC blow millions to get bombardier to integrate

an antiquated pole system along with the pantograph when pantograph lines were already being converted even before the 4400 had arrived??? If I can recall, apart from having to design a car with a wider gauge and a tighter turn radius which was inevitable, Bombardier had to scratch design the pole system as it has not used it in any of their products for decades. Even if only a few routes are able to be converted each year, surely, unless TTC was that incompetent, they would be able to finish the job before the last of the CLRVs are retired... rendering the additional pole virtually useless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as great as it is to finally see the pantographs at work, this is sadly another example of the useless wasting of money. Why did TTC blow millions to get bombardier to integrate

an antiquated pole system along with the pantograph when pantograph lines were already being converted even before the 4400 had arrived??? If I can recall, apart from having to design a car with a wider gauge and a tighter turn radius which was inevitable, Bombardier had to scratch design the pole system as it has not used it in any of their products for decades. Even if only a few routes are able to be converted each year, surely, unless TTC was that incompetent, they would be able to finish the job before the last of the CLRVs are retired... rendering the additional pole virtually useless.

Of course, you are also assuming that the TTC has known for years and years and years that they were going to convert the overhead to pantograph operation. Which they didn't. They only decided and had the money allocated in the last couple of years, well after the design and engineering for the streetcars had been started.

So if those worked on the network back then, what is it about the new pantographs that require upgrades to the network?

Those shunters stayed mainly in the yards, where there is little tangent track for them to run on. The overhead would have also been hung in such a way that no "U" hangers were used.

As for the Peter Witt that ran with a lyre, supposedly they staggered the tangent wire to prevent it from wearing a groove into the middle of the contact strip. It also would have been somewhat limited in where it could run, as it wouldn't have been able to use many of the curves downtown.

Dan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the Peter Witt that ran with a lyre, supposedly they staggered the tangent wire to prevent it from wearing a groove into the middle of the contact strip. It also would have been somewhat limited in where it could run, as it wouldn't have been able to use many of the curves downtown.

Dan

Were those the so-called "bow-type" collectors they tested in 1929?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Nov 13 AM: 4064 in eastbound DUNDAS service was removed from service at Bay. From Ossington, eastbound the operator had difficulty with the last few feet of breaking as the car lurched to a stop. She tried operating at a slower speed but with same result. At Spadina control suggested she off-load but as was a crush load the wise move was to gently travel to Bay, at which point the 40-odd passengers were put off. 4064 continued eastbound on Dundas, out-of-service, I presume going to Russell carhouse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On Lake Shore west of Humber loop, work continues. The new safety islands are longer and considerably wider than they were before. I have stood on the old platforms while a Canpar semi-trailer squeezes by and the greater width is very welcome. None of the islands has any of the superstructure installed (railings, shelters, fare machines--?) yet.

The overhead is also being replaced. The power cable is new. It hasn't been attached fully, but is held by a bit of wire at every hanger. It's not clear to me if the old hangers will be replaced with pantograph-friendly hangers as part of this.

The curbside stops are all being upgraded. There are huge excavations, something like three metres by five, at the stops. I haven't seen one where the concrete has been poured yet, so no idea what it's going to be. I wonder what will be done for the westbound Lake Shore/Kipling stop. There was no room for a shelter beforehand. But this is a major transfer point, and worse yet an all-too-often short turn point. I have stood in the rain after being turfed off a short-turning car. There are no shelter options on the north-east corner. And it's no better on the northwest corner, so a farside stop won't work. It will be interesting to see what's done here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On Lake Shore west of Humber loop, work continues. The new safety islands are longer and considerably wider than they were before. I have stood on the old platforms while a Canpar semi-trailer squeezes by and the greater width is very welcome. None of the islands has any of the superstructure installed (railings, shelters, fare machines--?) yet.

The curbside stops are all being upgraded. There are huge excavations, something like three metres by five, at the stops. I haven't seen one where the concrete has been poured yet, so no idea what it's going to be. I wonder what will be done for the westbound Lake Shore/Kipling stop. There was no room for a shelter beforehand. But this is a major transfer point, and worse yet an all-too-often short turn point. I have stood in the rain after being turfed off a short-turning car. There are no shelter options on the north-east corner. And it's no better on the northwest corner, so a farside stop won't work. It will be interesting to see what's done here.

I saw this work being done a couple weeks ago (the platform work) and I'm still trying to figure it out in my head as to whether they will be able to accomodate 2 LRV's. The new platforms will definitely be much longer, but long enough to accomodate 2 LRV's I dont know. With all the bunching that always occurs around Lake Shore, I think it would be benefecial.

As for the westbound stop at Kipling and Lakeshore, if that foolish cell phone tower wasnt built 5-6 years ago then a shelter could've been built there. The only real option for a shelter at that location is for one of those smaller ones that dont protect people from the elements, and that would be useless to install.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like the TTC has subtly introduced the symbol they plan on using when the new streetcars enter service. The segment of Queen St. East where they tested the new vehicles last month has the new symbol in the matching blue while the other streetcar routes use the current symbol.

Streetcar_Testing_Ma.jpg

2•••

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TTC will be removing Front St and Wellington Stops on Bathurst once the new platforms are built at Niargra St. They are near side and were being form when I saw them a few weeks ago.

They were rebuilting the platforms at Front St on Spadina when I last saw them as well finally finshing 2 section of the ROW on the bridge at the expansion joints.

Fleet stops at Bathurst were being rebuilt both wider as well long.

There are 4 stops between Park Lawn and Long Branch loop that need to be remove and hope they will be under this conversion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this work being done a couple weeks ago (the platform work) and I'm still trying to figure it out in my head as to whether they will be able to accomodate 2 LRV's. The new platforms will definitely be much longer, but long enough to accomodate 2 LRV's I dont know. With all the bunching that always occurs around Lake Shore, I think it would be benefecial.

As for the westbound stop at Kipling and Lakeshore, if that foolish cell phone tower wasnt built 5-6 years ago then a shelter could've been built there. The only real option for a shelter at that location is for one of those smaller ones that dont protect people from the elements, and that would be useless to install.

Mitch Stambler spoke at a transit forum for south Etobicoke last night.

It seems that the 39th St. eastbound stop, and likely the westbound stop, are going away as they are "too close to the next stop". Oh dear, those are my local stops. :( Next closest for is probably Long Branch loop, but that's a pain to access. Oddly, the northbound stop is still in limbo because they are "awaiting development". But it sits across from the mini-park on the slopes of the Brown's Line overpass, so that's strange. (If they want to remove stops, how about one of 29th and 30th westbound? An LFLRV might be able to service both of them at the same time. :mellow:

The platforms are long enough to accomodate an LFLRV even if there are some vehicles stopped in the same lane. But I don't think there's any notion of having two LFLRVs being accomodated at the plaltform.

It looks like the westbound stop at Kipling is getting a "platform" in the sidewalk, but it's not clear what shelter, if any, will be there. I have to disagree about the cell tower site for a shelter; you would not be able to see the streetcar coming.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Curb cuts were in place and finished this past week on Bathurst at most stops, providing a ramp for wheelchair users. The bumpy "safety edge" stripping used on subway platform edges is also in use on these ramps.

Of note: Adelaide did not get this treatment in either direction. One has to wonder if this stop will be removed. One can only hope.

Also, regarding the new paltforms at Niagara, which will be replacing the stops at Wellington and Front, a new traffic signal is also being installed at Niagara & Bathurst.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Curb cuts were in place and finished this past week on Bathurst at most stops, providing a ramp for wheelchair users. The bumpy "safety edge" stripping used on subway platform edges is also in use on these ramps.

Of note: Adelaide did not get this treatment in either direction. One has to wonder if this stop will be removed. One can only hope.

Also, regarding the new paltforms at Niagara, which will be replacing the stops at Wellington and Front, a new traffic signal is also being installed at Niagara & Bathurst.

My recommendation was to remove Adelaide along with 3 other stops north of it to Bloor. I even call for the removal of the Bloor stop since the station is close to it in the first place.

I did call for the Wellington stop to be remove as well. I have no issue with the Niagara new stop as it only adds a short extra walking distance to Front as well been more safe to get on/off there now. There was a crosswalk there before and with high traffic trying to turn o/off there. Putting in traffic light deals with the issues for everyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

The overhead along Lake Shore has been extensively updated, although I have only noticed a few random pantograph-friendly suspension bits around Long Branch loop.

What is most striking is the upgrade to the power lines. I walked the short bit from Islington (nee Seventh) to Eleventh, and it seemed that every third transverse suspension spans also included a power feed from the main power cable strung along the sidewalk poles. Even more interesting, there were at least two places where the power feeds were paired, one on each adjoining span. They may be around stops but it wasn't 100% obvious, for example there was a pair west of Islington but not east of Islington, and obviously there are stops on each side.

I don't know what the old standard was, but clearly there are way way more power feeds now. Anyone know more about the technical details?

And, unless Lake Shore is about to see a huge increase in overall service, all these power feeds seem to support are headways of:

  • 25 minutes
  • one minute
  • thirty seconds
  • 20 minutes

The overhead is set up for the two and three car parades that are all too common on Lake Shore....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those additional power feeds don't mean a thing until they either upgrade the substation at 23rd street or put in a new one at Long Branch Loop.

Is this something they may possibly have done during the long shutdown of service on Lake Shore? Is this kind of thing something that will fly under the radar unless one follows TTC procurements, or is it something very very obvious the casual observer can't possibly miss?

Last time I went by the loop, there was a pile of containers and a couple of site offices scattered all over.. Maybe there was a substation in one of the containers. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...