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GOA transit news, info etc

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4 hours ago, MCIBUS said:

But this is for the Trillium Line not Confederation line. Ones Electric the other Diesel.The thing is they have 6 trains presently and asuming Stage 2 gets its funding from the Feds and still gets it from the province, who many will thewy need.

 

Airprt Link 1 or 2)Thats where they should of run the Bombardier Talents.

Main line? at present 4? How many more? I have a feeling OC will run full service during rush hour 6-9/3-6 the whole lenght but between 9-3 &6-midnigh I only see 15-30 min service between South Keys & Bowmanville or what ever the name is for the farest new station.

 

I think they should sray with the Alstons Diesel trains.And when stage 2 opens up for the Confederation Line buy a few more Alstons(not sure how many)for the Confederation Line. This way tour system stays the same.

 

If there only going to use 1 train for the Airport link(from my understanding it'll be a seperate operation from the main link) why get rid of the Talents use them there 1 train for service the other as spare.

I know it's for the Trillium line I used the TTC as an example.

As for why the Talents were retired 

They are incompatible with the Alstom Lints (Can't be joined together in an emergency)  i.e  if one was to become disabled somewhere between Walkley and the Airport. 

 

 

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I think one of the reports mentioned walkley yard being expanded to hold 21 trains. 

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Quote

Liberals defer major tax pledge in 2017 federal budget

BILL CURRY AND ROBERT FIFE

 

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Mar. 22, 2017 4:31PM EDT

Last updated Thursday, Mar. 23, 2017 7:50AM EDT

 

Finance Minister Bill Morneau has put off tax hikes on wealthier Canadians, delivering a budget Wednesday that promises new money for job training, child care and social housing but offers no plan to improve the country’s debt outlook.

The revenue-strapped Trudeau government will run a $28.5-billion deficit for the coming fiscal year with no timeline to balance the books over the next five years.

As expected, the government’s second budget was largely about carving up the big spending plans announced in its first budget last year, with little new spending over and above what the Liberals had previously announced.

Federal budget highlights: 10 things you need to know

Rob Carrick: Ten ways the 2017 federal budget will affect your personal finances

U.S. President Donald Trump was not mentioned by name, but Mr. Morneau’s budget highlighted the sizable amount of uncertainty facing the Canadian economy largely because of outside factors. The budget noted that any U.S. actions on trade and taxes could potentially have a negative impact on Canada.

On Wednesday, Ottawa chose to hold off on a campaign pledge to raise billions in new revenue by closing tax loopholes that benefit high-income Canadians.

Mr. Trump has promised “massive” tax cuts, but details are not expected to emerge from Washington for months.

The Liberal budget does close some corporate tax loopholes. It also hikes taxes on alcohol, tobacco and ride-sharing services such as Uber and eliminates some targeted tax credits, including one that rewarded public-transit users.

The budget does not include plans to raise taxes on investment income such as capital gains, a topic that had been of particular concern on Bay Street in recent weeks.

But Mr. Morneau is promising to present a paper later this year that will outline potential tax changes that could affect upper-income earners, particularly those who use corporate structures to pay less tax.

Having already eliminated income splitting for families with children in their first budget, the Liberals are now setting their sights on private business structures that still allow couples to split income for tax purposes.

“Going forward, we will close loopholes that result in unfair tax advantages for some at the expense of others,” Mr. Morneau told the House of Commons.

Opposition parties said Mr. Morneau’s talk of taking on the rich is contradicted by the minister’s budget decisions.

Interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose slammed the Liberals for failing to rein in spending while nickel and diming working Canadians.

“The Prime Minister has decided to get rid of the benefit for public-transit passes, which of course are used by most low-income Canadians – particularly young people and students,” she said. “He’s also going to tax your beer. … [The budget] even taxes Uber and it clearly demonstrates that the Prime Minister is completely out of step with the challenges that regular ordinary people have when they’re trying to pay for the cost of living.”

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair said there was little in the budget for Canadians struggling with rising costs and record household debt and questioned why the government is delaying tax hikes for the wealthy one per cent.

“It’s fair to say when you look at this budget, that the rich are getting what they want and ordinary Canadians are not getting what they need,” he said, pointing to the fact that the Liberals have not acted on a campaign promise to limit stock-option deductions.

The tax review is set to attract considerable attention over the coming year. It drew immediate concern from Canadian Federation of Small Business president Dan Kelly, who said tens of thousands of Canadians could potentially be affected.

Tax expert Kim Moody, who reviewed the budget for the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada, said those concerns are justified.

“It’s pretty obvious that private companies and their families are under the radar and under attack,” he said.

Canada’s high levels of household debt were listed as an ongoing risk to the economy, but the budget did not announce new measures to address concerns about overheated housing markets in Toronto and Vancouver.

The budget did announce $40-million over five years for Statistics Canada to develop a Housing Statistics Framework that will create a national database of residential transactions and track foreign home-buyer activity.

The deficit is forecast to jump from $23-billion in the current fiscal year to $28.5-billion in 2017-18, before declining to about $19-billion by 2021-22. Those figures include an adjustment for risk of $3-billion a year, a cushion that has been reinstated after Mr. Morneau dropped it in his fall economic update.

The budget forecast projects that the federal debt will shrink slightly as a percentage of GDP, from 31.5 per cent this year to 30.9 per cent in 2021-22. However, economists expressed concern that the budget does not include a target for eliminating the deficit. They warn that this puts federal finances at risk in the event of a recession or slower-than-expected growth.

“The problem is when you get some sort of shock,” said Randall Bartlett, chief economist with the University of Ottawa’s Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy. “It throws your debt-to-GDP ratio out the window entirely.”

At a news conference with reporters, Mr. Morneau repeatedly declined to offer a timeline for erasing the deficit, pointing instead to the government’s plans to keep the debt-to-GDP ratio in check.

The budget has a special focus on improving the lives of women in the work force. Ottawa will allow women to claim maternity benefits for up to 12 weeks before their due date and extend parental benefits for up to 18 months at a lower rate. Federally regulated businesses will also be required to allow flexible work hours.

The government committed $100-million to combat sexual violence against women – a last-minute budgetary measure as a result of The Globe and Mail’s investigation that found that one in five sexual-assault allegations in Canada are deemed “unfounded” or baseless by police.

The budget breaks down previously announced funds for social infrastructure, giving $7-billion over 10 years to fund child-care spaces and $11.2-billion over 11 years for affordable housing.

As expected, the budget did not provide any spending details on planned increases to the military. Those details will be included when a defence policy review is unveiled later this year. Billions of earmarked dollars to buy new equipment and buildings over the next 20 years was deferred.

There was a sprinkling of money to many Liberal priorities, including better legal aid for asylum seekers, rehabilitating inmates, establishing an LGBTQ2 secretariat within the Privy Council office, money for the arts and free Internet for disadvantaged families.

John Manley, President and CEO of the Business Council of Canada, said in a statement that the budget represents a cautious approach as Canada braces for major change in the United States.

“Right now, the sensible approach is to wait and see what comes out of Washington,” he said. “But make no mistake: if American policy makers move to cut personal and corporate taxes, Canada must respond.”

Breaking

I can't deduct 15% of my transit passes on my personal tax return

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Councillors Mathieu Flurey and Tobi Nussbaum are to have meetings with OC Transpo management to discuss the poor level of service in their respective wards.

In the month of March there were 236 recorded cancellations of service in the area together with numerous delays, recorded incidents include a 90 minute gap on service 1 between Springfield and Rideau, gaps of 60 mins on the 9 at peak hours between Downtown and Hurdman , 20-30 minute gaps in service on the 12 at peak periods and  60 minute gaps on the 19, both councillors offices have been receiving numerous complaints from local residents regarding the level of service, local business have also voiced concerns as staff are often late for work due to cancellations and delays.

 

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5 hours ago, Centralsmt said:

Councillors Mathieu Flurey and Tobi Nussbaum are to have meetings with OC Transpo management to discuss the poor level of service in their respective wards.

In the month of March there were 236 recorded cancellations of service in the area together with numerous delays, recorded incidents include a 90 minute gap on service 1 between Springfield and Rideau, gaps of 60 mins on the 9 at peak hours between Downtown and Hurdman , 20-30 minute gaps in service on the 12 at peak periods and  60 minute gaps on the 19, both councillors offices have been receiving numerous complaints from local residents regarding the level of service, local business have also voiced concerns as staff are often late for work due to cancellations and delays.

 

Finally, when is this? And who got these numbers! :P

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When ever in dought call your Councillor  and more then likely things will be handled more quickly.

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I don't agree with that. Every issue I've brought up with my local councillor has been pointedly ignored, and local bus service has in fact got worse instead on the premise that "LRT is coming" even though it doesn't help me much at all.

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2 hours ago, HB_1024 said:

I don't agree with that. Every issue I've brought up with my local councillor has been pointedly ignored, and local bus service has in fact got worse instead on the premise that "LRT is coming" even though it doesn't help me much at all.

 Is this Kanata South? If so I agree

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4 hours ago, CyrusKafaiWu said:

Finally, when is this? And who got these numbers! :P

The initial meeting took place this morning with the councillors and OC Management. The councillors themselves released the numbers last week when announcing that they had requested a meeting, both are on record as describing the recent service levels as "unacceptable".

 

 

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Random Fact: the 176 is being changed to 80 with an orange frequent designation. But, the wait times are scheduled up to 20 minutes between 6am to 6pm from Monday to Friday. 

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Just more allowing room for service "improvements". It's very likely they're deferring a frequency upgrade because there aren't enough buses as it is.

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15 hours ago, JCL said:

http://ottawa.ca/en/news/oc-transpo-spring-service-starts-april-23

In addition to the service change announcement, there are a few items of interest:

1) Introduction of exterior bus announcement

2) New barcode for paper-transfers

3) Discontinuation of paper bus passes and paper tickets

Goodbye to those that would hoard paper tickets keeping the lower rate (though, it is noted that current tickets at $1.70 will be honoured until June 30, 2018).

The writing was on the wall for a very long time along with announcements confirming the phaseout of paper based media. I know some people would still hold onto purchasing paper tickets at certain retailers if they held a certain card that gave them a higher percentage back for shopping at a certain retailer such as cash back cards.

I know with the President's Choice World Elite MasterCard, the cardholder would get 30 PC Points back (3 percent) for every dollar spent at Loblaws, banner stores or Shoppers Drug Mart stores. Along with finding a store that sells fare media (I remember when I once bought a monthly pass at the Southgate Shoppers Drug Mart store years ago).

Maybe I will purchase some tickets for collection purposes though. 

14 hours ago, OCtranspo10 said:

 Is this Kanata South? If so I agree

Kanata South transit service is brutal. Especially on weekends/holidays where it is only the 168 that is running. 

The last time I was in Kanata South on a weekend to reach Real Canadian Superstore, I had to take the entire loop from the north until I got to the south. Took roughly 40 minutes including walking. Where as the 161 would have gotten me there much quicker, more direct. Except it doesn't run on weekends. 

Along with no rapid transit route (I think they are reserving route 64 for future use when demand is warranted). Essentially taking 164 (previous well known local route) along with keeping in order with the other routes in line (61, 62 and 63 routes designated as rapid transit routes). 

13 hours ago, Centralsmt said:

The initial meeting took place this morning with the councillors and OC Management. The councillors themselves released the numbers last week when announcing that they had requested a meeting, both are on record as describing the recent service levels as "unacceptable".

I don't know how they are having so many cancellations or missing trips. Especially forecasting the demands based on available supply. 

I think people would rather seen actionable solutions than just simply knowing there is a problem, but not finding a solution or implementing one because it is too difficult. 

 

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7 hours ago, GTAmissions1 said:

 

I don't know how they are having so many cancellations or missing trips. Especially forecasting the demands based on available supply. 

I think people would rather seen actionable solutions than just simply knowing there is a problem, but not finding a solution or implanting one because it is too difficult. 

 

 

I have been sent a response from one of the councillors who attended the meeting with a broad outline of the problems, however there is a further report to be produced and until that has it would be unwise to make any further comments particularly on a forum such as this.

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18 hours ago, GTAmissions1 said:

Goodbye to those that would hoard paper tickets keeping the lower rate (though, it is noted that current tickets at $1.70 will be honoured until June 30, 2018).

The writing was on the wall for a very long time along with announcements confirming the phaseout of paper based media. I know some people would still hold onto purchasing paper tickets at certain retailers if they held a certain card that gave them a higher percentage back for shopping at a certain retailer such as cash back cards.

I know with the President's Choice World Elite MasterCard, the cardholder would get 30 PC Points back (3 percent) for every dollar spent at Loblaws, banner stores or Shoppers Drug Mart stores. Along with finding a store that sells fare media (I remember when I once bought a monthly pass at the Southgate Shoppers Drug Mart store years ago).

Maybe I will purchase some tickets for collection purposes though. 

(3.40*0.98)-(3.35*(0.97))
(ticket fare with 3% cashback credit card if tickets bought at Loblaws) - (presto fare with 2% cash back if uses auto reload) = 0.0825

why did I calculate this

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18 hours ago, GTAmissions1 said:

I don't know how they are having so many cancellations or missing trips. Especially forecasting the demands based on available supply.

How about road closures, traffic disruptions, dead buses, unrealistically-timed deadheads and schedules, staff shortage, and general delays? Forecasts mean nothing when everything is factored in.

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2 hours ago, Waiting for 30 Minutes said:

How about road closures, traffic disruptions, dead buses, unrealistically-timed deadheads and schedules, staff shortage, and general delays? Forecasts mean nothing when everything is factored in.

I blame the removal of pens in the budget as the root cause

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