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51 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

Mississauga growing? How much has population or ridership grown compared to 2019? Tell me.

Here's an official chart that the province uses to chart growth in the province. You can do some deductive reasoning from there.

1661206720291.png

 

51 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

Mississauga is temporarily using extra buses to make up for construction for the LRT. Construction slowing down the buses reducing their frequencies, thus more buses needed to maintain existing frequencies. The finishing of construction alone will free up many buses. Furthermore, Mississauga's busiest corridor won't even need buses anymore. We are talking about dozens of buses out of service. The Hurontario corridor with 30,000 boardings, that's around 15% of Mississauga's ridership. We are talking about 15% loss of transit ridership for MiWay once the LRT opens.

You do realize Mississauga is short on buses, and there are many routes that arent operating a pre-pandemic levels? And you also do realize, that those "dozens of buses" would do wonders for routes that are operating at capacity at various points in the day.

 

51 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

As for LRT bringing in more ridership, I haven't seen that in Dallas, the largest modern light rail system in North America, but also one of the worst transit ridership and mode share in North America. See also Seattle, one of the leaders in North America in terms of transit ridership, and very little rail service, almost a pure bus network.

Apples and oranges. Mississauga is not Dallas, Dallas is not Mississauga. Speed and capacity are the 2 reasons the Hurontario line is being built. Do you really think there wouldnt be additional ridership on a line that sees larger vehicles run along the spine of a city that is seeing mass development?

 

51 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

LRT isn't being built in Mississauga to bring more ridership. LRT is being built because the ridership is already too high. LRT is being built because of overcrowding on Hurontario. Rapid transit is not for solving the problem of low ridership. Rapid transit is a solution for high ridership. It's not that high ridership is the result of more rail built, but rather more rail is built as the the result of high ridership.

Ok, so if ridership is already too high on Hurontario, what does that tell you? You just defeated the point of your own argument.

 

51 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

If Mississauga is counting on new rail service to grow ridership, that is already big mistake, a mistake that cities all over the USA have made. If Mississauga really wants to grow its bus ridership, it will need to improve its bus service, and it will have plenty of buses to spare once the LRT opens.

Additional Light Rail, and bus service would all improve overall MiWay service. Thus going back to my earlier point, how would investing in more buses be a mistake?

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14 minutes ago, lip said:

Here's an official chart that the province uses to chart growth in the province. You can do some deductive reasoning from there.

1661206720291.png

 

You do realize Mississauga is short on buses, and there are many routes that arent operating a pre-pandemic levels? And you also do realize, that those "dozens of buses" would do wonders for routes that are operating at capacity at various points in the day.

 

Apples and oranges. Mississauga is not Dallas, Dallas is not Mississauga. Speed and capacity are the 2 reasons the Hurontario line is being built. Do you really think there wouldnt be additional ridership on a line that sees larger vehicles run along the spine of a city that is seeing mass development?

 

Ok, so if ridership is already too high on Hurontario, what does that tell you? You just defeated the point of your own argument.

 

Additional Light Rail, and bus service would all improve overall MiWay service. Thus going back to my earlier point, how would investing in more buses be a mistake?

As I said, Mississauga is short on buses because of construction on the LRT causing delays. Construction is only temporary. Finished construction would mean no more delays of buses, and lack of delays would free up buses. Finishing construction would also mean no more buses along the Hurontario corridor freeing up even more buses. Hurontario is 15% of the system's ridership.

Defeated the point my argument? That rail is not the reason for high ridership? How does a overcrowding along a non-rail corridor like Hurontario defeat the point of my argument? Explain this to me.

I don't know what growth forecast for Peel has to do with this conversation. Mississauga, Brampton Caledon, apples and oranges as you might say. Mississauga is built out, and has been built out for quite a while. Population declined 0.5% from 2016 to 2021. To invest in more buses, after an LRT replaces a bus route that represents 15% of ridership, after 0.5% population decline, in the midst of pandemic and people working from home, in the midst of recession which will cause major job losses and thus less people commuting to work, doesn't make sense at all to me.

17 hours ago, Xtrazsteve said:

If you put it that way, Miway doesn't really need a single articulated buses. Same with most GTA including some of TTC's artic routes. Most of the routes can be operated with better service than 12-15 min headways using artic buses. They could bring this down to 7-12 min instead.

Staffing issue however remains a problem, thus maybe more artics at wider headways has became a better way till they can hire more people.

I do think articulated buses are needed for MiWay and TTC and other GTA agencies, but just don't rely on them too heavily like Ottawa tried to do. Ottawa learned the lesson the hard way during that snowstowm, and GTA doesn't need to make the same mistake.

Even without snow, problem with articulated buses is if there is still only one door for boarding, it means more people waiting at each stop, so there will be more delays as result of these larger crowds. With longer vehicles, whether articulated buses or LRVs or subway trains, you will need an all-door boarding scheme to unlock the full potential of these vehicles. Using them for regular routes is probably not a good idea. Limited stop routes, especially in transitways, probably is okay.

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8 minutes ago, ngdvd said:

As I said, Mississauga is short on buses because of construction on the LRT causing delays. Construction is only temporary. Finished construction would mean no more delays of buses, and lack of delays would free up buses. Finishing construction would also mean no more buses along the Hurontario corridor freeing up even more buses. Hurontario is 15% of the system's ridership.

Defeated the point my argument? That rail is not the reason for high ridership? How does a overcrowding along a non-rail corridor like Hurontario defeat the point of my argument? Explain this to me.

I don't know what growth forecast for Peel has to do with this conversation. Mississauga, Brampton Caledon, apples and oranges as you might say. Mississauga is built out, and has been built out for quite a while. Population declined 0.5% from 2016 to 2021. To invest in more buses, after an LRT replaces a bus route that represents 15% of ridership, after 0.5% population decline, in the midst of pandemic and people working from home, in the midst of recession which will cause major job losses and thus less people commuting to work, doesn't make sense at all to me.

There's no point in me continuing since you have your own set of beliefs regarding Mississauga. If you think Mississauga is built out and wont grow, I wont stop you from believing that. I guess that's why all the condos sprouting out all over Mississauga will be empty huh? And all the redevelopment taking place in the waterfront isnt needed, and they're just doing it for fun to push around dirt. Clearly the people who study population growth in the province think differently.

We'll go along with your point that Mississauga wont need additional growth buses once construction wraps up on the LRT, because they can divert the buses that were used on Hurontario onto other lines in the city.

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1 minute ago, lip said:

 

There's no point in me continuing since you have your own set of beliefs regarding Mississauga. If you think Mississauga is built out and wont grow, I wont stop you from believing that. I guess that's why all the condos sprouting out all over Mississauga will be empty huh? And all the redevelopment taking place in the waterfront isnt needed, and they're just doing it for fun to push around dirt. Clearly the people who study population growth in the province think differently.

We'll go along with your point that Mississauga wont need additional growth buses once construction wraps up on the LRT, because they can divert the buses that were used on Hurontario onto other lines in the city.

People who studied population growth in the province looked at Peel as a whole, not at Mississauga specifically. The chart you posted says nothing about Mississauga's growth.

Development is not the same as population growth. There are other factors such as household size. Mississauga can grow in terms of buildings but still remain the same or even decline in terms of population.

Population is not the only factor either, ridership is the main factor in demand and the capacity needed. And MiWay will lose 15% of its ridership when the LRT opens on Hurontario.

I never said Mississauga won't need growth buses. My point was they don't need them immediately in the near future. With no more delays due to LRT construction, with no more buses needed on Hurontario, with ongoing pandemic and people working from home, with incoming recession and people losing their jobs, capacity for transit ridership growth seems not an urgent concern.

Winnipeg Transit has over 600 buses, almost 200 more than MiWay. Two similar sized systems serving similar population and similar ridership. Obviously, Mississauga needs to catch up. All I am saying is now might not be the right time.

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20 hours ago, ngdvd said:

Problem with artics is operating in the snow, too easily get stuck. Seen it personally way too many times. Gotta be extra careful keeping the roads clean, but of course cleaning roads means snow piling up at the side where buses operate. Maybe keep the artics in the garage during the snowstorm.

Another problem is the busiest route in Mississauga will no longer need articulated buses once the Hurontario LRT finishes construction. To invest in more buses would be a mistake, and more articulated buses even more so.

 

18 hours ago, Xtrazsteve said:

If you put it that way, Miway doesn't really need a single articulated buses. Same with most GTA including some of TTC's artic routes. Most of the routes can be operated with better service than 12-15 min headways using artic buses. They could bring this down to 7-12 min instead.

Staffing issue however remains a problem, thus maybe more artics at wider headways has became a better way till they can hire more people.

 

While the Hurontario corridor will not need articulated buses when the LRT opens, there will still be demand on other corridors. Suggestions to improve frequencies are nice but run into a bigger constraint in the amount of budgeted service hours which is set and approved by council each year.

While Hurontario will no longer need articulated buses when the LRT opens, there will be other corridors that require them due to ridership growth. For example the 42 Derry runs at 6 minute peak frequency and 14 of 17 peak buses on the route are scheduled to be artics. Mavis is another corridor that has trended towards requiring articulated buses in both the peak and off peak.

With constraints on the amount of service hours that can be added artics are another way to increase capacity with less of a impact on direct operating costs, hence why MiWay plans to expand the fleet of articulated buses from the current 77 to 101 by 2024.

2 hours ago, ngdvd said:

Mississauga is temporarily using extra buses to make up for construction for the LRT. Construction slowing down the buses reducing their frequencies, thus more buses needed to maintain existing frequencies. The finishing of construction alone will free up many buses. Furthermore, Mississauga's busiest corridor won't even need buses anymore. We are talking about dozens of buses out of service. The Hurontario corridor with 30,000 boardings, that's around 15% of Mississauga's ridership. We are talking about 15% loss of transit ridership for MiWay once the LRT opens.

You're correct that the LRT opening will allow for buses to be removed from Hurontario but there will still need to be a local service operating at a reasonable frequency as there are several well used local stops. By the way, there currently aren't any additional buses being used on the Hurontario corridor to compensate for the LRT construction. In September 2019, the 19 used 21 buses in peak periods while the 103 used 11 for a total of 32 buses. For September 2022, the peak requirements are 10 buses for route 2, 9 buses for route 17/18 (interlined) and 6 buses for route 103, a total of 25 buses. Even if the 103's peak frequency was restored to the 11 minute frequency pre-covid it would require an additional 4 buses bringing the total to 29.

2 hours ago, ngdvd said:

Mississauga growing? How much has population or ridership grown compared to 2019? Tell me.

LRT isn't being built in Mississauga to bring more ridership. LRT is being built because the ridership is already too high. LRT is being built because of overcrowding on Hurontario. Rapid transit is not for solving the problem of low ridership. Rapid transit is a solution for high ridership. It's not that high ridership is the result of more rail built, but rather more rail is built as the the result of high ridership.

If Mississauga is counting on new rail service to grow ridership, that is already big mistake, a mistake that cities all over the USA have made. If Mississauga really wants to grow its bus ridership, it will need to improve its bus service, and it will have plenty of buses to spare once the LRT opens.

Agreed that the LRT is being built because the demand on Hurontario warrants higher order transit (which should have been built on the corridor years ago).

However the LRT is being built not only with current ridership in mind but also the city provincially mandated growth plans which call for more density on major transit corridors and major transit station areas. The increased density will bring more ridership, because even if the overall city population remains stagnant or only grows slightly, there will be a net increase in population along the LRT corridor even if there are population declines elsewhere.

1 hour ago, lip said:

You do realize Mississauga is short on buses, and there are many routes that arent operating a pre-pandemic levels? And you also do realize, that those "dozens of buses" would do wonders for routes that are operating at capacity at various points in the day.

 

1 hour ago, lip said:

 

There's no point in me continuing since you have your own set of beliefs regarding Mississauga. If you think Mississauga is built out and wont grow, I wont stop you from believing that. I guess that's why all the condos sprouting out all over Mississauga will be empty huh? And all the redevelopment taking place in the waterfront isnt needed, and they're just doing it for fun to push around dirt. Clearly the people who study population growth in the province think differently.

We'll go along with your point that Mississauga wont need additional growth buses once construction wraps up on the LRT, because they can divert the buses that were used on Hurontario onto other lines in the city.

Pre-covid, in September 2019 there was a peak requirement of 384/500 buses resulting in a 24% spare ratio. The current requirement is approximately 315/475 buses (some buses retired without direct replacement during COVID) resulting in a 34% spare ratio. There is no shortage of physical bus assets and the spare ratio at MiWay was considerably higher than the industry standard 15-20% even pre-covid.

As for the issue of adding additional growth buses, I do have to agree with ngdvd that there likely won't be a need for many additional growth buses in the next few years. The Hurontario LRT freeing up buses is one reason, but another big factor is that MiWay like many other systems coming out of COVID has experienced higher growth of off-peak ridership compared to peak service. Additional off peak service does not require fleet expansion to accomodate.

One thing to consider in all this is with any significant economic event, including COVID, is that it impacts transit ridership levels and travel patterns even over the medium to long term. Travel patterns and demand have changed and it is not unlike the 2008 financial crisis where several routes lost ridership and took years to recover, or never reached the high point again. Given all this, previous observations or perceptions may no longer be valid. 

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The question is , what is the model split today and what was it 20 years ago??

What was the population of Mississauga 2002 and what is it today?

What was the projected numbers for Mississauga population for 2025 and what is it today? What year was it based on?

What does it cost to put someone in the driver seat today based on 10 minute service 7 days a week and what will it be in 2040??

What is the load number based on off peak and peak hours for 40's and 60's buses?

What will the numbers be for LRV's??

What is the current ridership numbers for 2, 17, 103 and 502 in Mississauga today and back in 2018?

What were Hurontario numbers back in 2010?

What does it cost to buy a 40 and 60 hybrid bus compare to a diesel Bus?

How many buses demean spare are dead buses?

How many systems are short personnel on all levels? Does this includes Mississauga?

 

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12 hours ago, Xtrazsteve said:

Population itself isn’t directly related to ridership. Other factors like cost of living, gas prices, car sales availability could also drive transit ridership higher. So even if Mississauga stops growing, ridership could still grow.

True, but not the way Council looks at it. They want to know how many boarding takes place yearly and how to keep transit from eating a bigger chunk of the yearly budget.

Today ratio is nearly the same as it was 20 years ago, yet the population has exceeded its projected numbers by 20% and will be seeing over 1.2 million come 2040 with a transit system not able to handle it like today.

Can't have density in a few areas like what been plan as it will not help a system as a whole, not a part here and there with no real connection city wide.

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Do some routes have mixed regular/artic bus service? Since I feel like the route i most often ride (46 Tenth Line Osprey) would do good with artics on 2 runs due to the communities that the route serves. The 7:38 am running for the Northbound service and the 2:41 running of the Southbound route due to the times at which the local high schools start and dismiss respectively. On the 2:41 running the 40 foot busses are filled to the brim and an artic would solve said problem.

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On 10/6/2022 at 1:17 PM, Orion_II said:

Do some routes have mixed regular/artic bus service? Since I feel like the route i most often ride (46 Tenth Line Osprey) would do good with artics on 2 runs due to the communities that the route serves. The 7:38 am running for the Northbound service and the 2:41 running of the Southbound route due to the times at which the local high schools start and dismiss respectively. On the 2:41 running the 40 foot busses are filled to the brim and an artic would solve said problem.

Most of the routes that articulated buses run on are like that, actually. Usually it is because of capacity, but some serve school runs like the situation you described. Some of them could really do with articulated buses at all times (like the 42, where ridership has significantly increased over the last few years).

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On 10/6/2022 at 1:17 PM, Orion_II said:

Do some routes have mixed regular/artic bus service? Since I feel like the route i most often ride (46 Tenth Line Osprey) would do good with artics on 2 runs due to the communities that the route serves. The 7:38 am running for the Northbound service and the 2:41 running of the Southbound route due to the times at which the local high schools start and dismiss respectively. On the 2:41 running the 40 foot busses are filled to the brim and an artic would solve said problem.

Agreed, I commute using 46 regularly and I actually switched to taking an earlier bus to avoid the high school crowd. The issue is I'm not sure it is cost-effective to deadhead an articulated bus from one of the other corridors just to serve a single run in the morning and afternoon. Perhaps running more frequent buses at that time is needed instead?

On 10/1/2022 at 8:55 PM, MiExpress said:

So what to do? It's a very valid problem despite the constraints. Writing to MiWay's service development department as well as the local city councillor would be a good start making it clear the buses are completely full and more service hours (budget issue, city council) and capacity (artics) is required. Hopefully at the least MiWay can figure out a way to get artics back on the 110 until more service hours can be approved in the budget and drivers hired. UTM students collectively pay millions of dollars in U-Pass fees to the city so it's reasonable to expect better than what's currently offered and I would hope any feedback is taken very seriously, at the very least there should be a way to put artics on the 110 beginning in January with the additional 16 artic buses that will be in the fleet by then.

 

Thank you for your insightful comments. I will probably look into this and suggest that some of my peers do the same.

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21 minutes ago, AWEChess1 said:

Agreed, I commute using 46 regularly and I actually switched to taking an earlier bus to avoid the high school crowd. The issue is I'm not sure it is cost-effective to deadhead an articulated bus from one of the other corridors just to serve a single run in the morning and afternoon. Perhaps running more frequent buses at that time is needed instead?

Thank you for your insightful comments. I will probably look into this and suggest that some of my peers do the same.

More frequent busses would actually be a wonderful solution because of the timing. The high school that the majority of the high school crowd uses dismisses at 2:20, and one run of the 46S arrives at the high school bus stop at 2:19 while the other arrives at 2:41, so you get one bus which is completely dead, and the next bus is packed. Of course, if the 2:19 bus is delayed by anything more than 2-3 minutes, its the packed bus.

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On 10/10/2022 at 8:32 AM, Orion_II said:

More frequent busses would actually be a wonderful solution because of the timing. The high school that the majority of the high school crowd uses dismisses at 2:20, and one run of the 46S arrives at the high school bus stop at 2:19 while the other arrives at 2:41, so you get one bus which is completely dead, and the next bus is packed. Of course, if the 2:19 bus is delayed by anything more than 2-3 minutes, its the packed bus.

There are also the factors of not having enough drivers and service levels being frozen for this year.  Meaning any new service is simply a re-allocation of existing service, then subject to driver availability.  MiWay has faced issues with certain trips not being served because of the driver shortage.  Generally, the routes seeing potential missing trips have either alternatives or are frequent enough that the additional ridership can be absorbed by the remaining vehicles in service.

With that being said, here are the Service Changes for October 24:

Service Changes on Monday, October 24

Starting Monday, Oct. 24, 2022, there will be MiWay service changes that include increasing service on some routes to respond to ridership growth and making schedule adjustments on other routes to improve service reliability.

Service increases due to high demand

The routes below will have increased service to respond to ridership growth and provide more capacity where and when customers need it.

  • 2 Hurontario (weekdays)
  • 7 Airport (Saturday and Sunday)
  • 26 Burnhamthorpe (weekdays)

Schedule adjustments

Schedule adjustments will be made on the routes below to improve service reliability as traffic and ridership patterns continue to evolve throughout the city.

MiWay will make further schedule adjustments as needed to ensure that services remain responsive to customer needs.

  • 5 Dixie (weekdays, Saturday and Sunday)
  • 8 Cawthra (weekdays and Saturday)
  • 9 Rathburn-Thomas (weekdays)
  • 10 Bristol-Britannia (weekdays and Saturday)
  • 16/16A Malton (weekdays)
  • 20 Rathburn (weekdays, Saturday and Sunday)
  • 30 Rexdale (weekdays and Saturday)

Please check for updated schedules.

Next planned service change – Monday, December 19, 2022.

I guess I'll have to go through the schedules, but which routes from the second list will have their service reallocated to the ones on the first list?  Without mentioning a reduction in service as in previous Service Change announcements, "Service Adjustments" simply sounds like there may be modifications to the various schedules.  MiWay may simply be sugar-coating the situation by taking a bus or two off one route (thereby increasing the headway/reducing the frequency) and putting it on another.

We'll have to see if transit is a ballot box issue with the Municipal Elections in a few weeks.  It doesn't sound like it based on the election material I've been getting in the mail.

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6 hours ago, Gil said:

There are also the factors of not having enough drivers and service levels being frozen for this year.  Meaning any new service is simply a re-allocation of existing service, then subject to driver availability.  MiWay has faced issues with certain trips not being served because of the driver shortage.  Generally, the routes seeing potential missing trips have either alternatives or are frequent enough that the additional ridership can be absorbed by the remaining vehicles in service.

With that being said, here are the Service Changes for October 24:

Service Changes on Monday, October 24

Starting Monday, Oct. 24, 2022, there will be MiWay service changes that include increasing service on some routes to respond to ridership growth and making schedule adjustments on other routes to improve service reliability.

Service increases due to high demand

The routes below will have increased service to respond to ridership growth and provide more capacity where and when customers need it.

  • 2 Hurontario (weekdays)
  • 7 Airport (Saturday and Sunday)
  • 26 Burnhamthorpe (weekdays)

Schedule adjustments

Schedule adjustments will be made on the routes below to improve service reliability as traffic and ridership patterns continue to evolve throughout the city.

MiWay will make further schedule adjustments as needed to ensure that services remain responsive to customer needs.

  • 5 Dixie (weekdays, Saturday and Sunday)
  • 8 Cawthra (weekdays and Saturday)
  • 9 Rathburn-Thomas (weekdays)
  • 10 Bristol-Britannia (weekdays and Saturday)
  • 16/16A Malton (weekdays)
  • 20 Rathburn (weekdays, Saturday and Sunday)
  • 30 Rexdale (weekdays and Saturday)

Please check for updated schedules.

Next planned service change – Monday, December 19, 2022.

I guess I'll have to go through the schedules, but which routes from the second list will have their service reallocated to the ones on the first list?  Without mentioning a reduction in service as in previous Service Change announcements, "Service Adjustments" simply sounds like there may be modifications to the various schedules.  MiWay may simply be sugar-coating the situation by taking a bus or two off one route (thereby increasing the headway/reducing the frequency) and putting it on another.

We'll have to see if transit is a ballot box issue with the Municipal Elections in a few weeks.  It doesn't sound like it based on the election material I've been getting in the mail.

Route 46 will have one all day bus removed (3 to 2) reducing the weekday frequency from 23 to 35 minutes all day.

As for service increases:

  • Route 2's weekday evening service between 6-9pm improves from 10 to 8 minutes
  • Route 26's weekday rush hour frequency improves from 17 to 14 minutes; midday and evening service improves from 26 to 21 minutes. This essentially restores the pre-covid service levels on the route.
  • Route 7's Saturday midday frequency improves from 30 to 24 minutes; Sunday all day frequency improves from 40 to 30 minutes.

While budgeted service hours are still a issue resulting in some cases of "robbing peter to pay paul" hopefully with new drivers being hired this fall the staffing situation will be less of a issue. The strong rumour is there will be another redesign of the Derry service in the new year, with the a new variant being reintroduced operating between Sheridan College and Humber College. Presumably this would be accomplished by reworking the 42A design and cancelling route 18, and depending on what route it takes in the east end possible changes to routes 22 and 30.

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23 minutes ago, AWEChess1 said:

Where did you find this out from? The service changes page didn't mention anything changing about 46.

Looks like it was omitted from the service change posting on the website perhaps by mistake, however if you check the schedules on the MiWay site for the 46 on October 24 it shows the new schedule with 35 minutes frequency. 

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Stay away from the QEW starting Oct 28-31 in Mississauga as you will be in a major traffic jam. This was to had taken place Thanksgiving weekend with a 65 hour closure, but wasn't ready for the closure considering it was known 2 years ago.

The east side of Hurontario St is close and will be dug up for both direction to allow for the push box for the "NEW" 3 northbound lanes to be push into position and the existing QEW lanes rebuilt. "ALL" QEW traffic will use a 2 lane off/on ramp to bypass the closure. The existing Northbound lanes will be converted for the LRT.

As far as I know, no Hurontario traffic will be allow to use the ramps as it would slow down the QEW traffic a lot more.

Route 2 is on Major Detour by the Queensway-Cawthra-Lakeshore as far as I know at this time

<https://blog.metrolinx.com/2022/10/13/weekend-restrictions-on-qew-partial-closure-of-hurontario/>

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8 hours ago, MiExpress said:

Looks like it was omitted from the service change posting on the website perhaps by mistake, however if you check the schedules on the MiWay site for the 46 on October 24 it shows the new schedule with 35 minutes frequency. 

I was wondering as this set of service changes looked pretty thin.  Funnily enough there was a survey on how to improve the website.  Posting all of the content would be one thing!  Still waiting on word for the next MiWay5 plan...

2 hours ago, drum118 said:

Stay away from the QEW starting Oct 28-31 in Mississauga as you will be in a major traffic jam. This was to had taken place Thanksgiving weekend with a 65 hour closure, but wasn't ready for the closure considering it was known 2 years ago.

The east side of Hurontario St is close and will be dug up for both direction to allow for the push box for the "NEW" 3 northbound lanes to be push into position and the existing QEW lanes rebuilt. "ALL" QEW traffic will use a 2 lane off/on ramp to bypass the closure. The existing Northbound lanes will be converted for the LRT.

As far as I know, no Hurontario traffic will be allow to use the ramps as it would slow down the QEW traffic a lot more.

Route 2 is on Major Detour by the Queensway-Cawthra-Lakeshore as far as I know at this time

<https://blog.metrolinx.com/2022/10/13/weekend-restrictions-on-qew-partial-closure-of-hurontario/>

The link in your post isn't hyperlinked, so clicking on it doesn't work - I've fixed it above.  Here it is again:

https://blog.metrolinx.com/2022/10/13/weekend-restrictions-on-qew-partial-closure-of-hurontario/

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3 hours ago, PrimeTio said:

Xcelsiors are in production, found them on a FB group.

13ED6813-A234-4CF1-BED7-CBBB62431D18.jpeg

A216C6CB-2EB4-4B53-8CC2-FF2B93D62EF7.jpeg

If these are the 22XX XDE40s, then these should replace the last of the remaining D40LFs. Personally, I'll be glad to see the 03XX and 05XX units go; I hate the interior in those things, its so drab and depressing. Its almost like those interiors were designed to make you feel bad for taking public transit. I'm glad that MiWay switched to using seats other than the 6488.

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29 minutes ago, Toro said:

Does both CP and Malton do decommissioning? Or just Malton ?

Both garages do decommissioning. When buses are retired, they get sent to Malton than bidded off. Before CP stored everything which was was dead, not sure why they stopped doing that.

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28 minutes ago, PrimeTio said:

Both garages do decommissioning. When buses are retired, they get sent to Malton than bidded off. Before CP stored everything which was was dead, not sure why they stopped doing that.

If one was to spot retired miway buses what area would you suggest?

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