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hl7534

MTA NYCT Subway/Bus discussion

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Just got back from NYC, it was nice meeting you again, Orion.

Unfortunately, didn't catch any R40 Slants on the B, I only got R68s on it.

Still had a blast, though, and I don't think I've ridden that many buses and subway trains all in one day before.

Subway Trains covered on my trip

R42, R44, R46, R62, R62A, R68, R68A, R142, R142A, R143, R160B

Subway Routes covered on my trip

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, A, E, B, V, L, N, Q, R, W, S.

Buses covered on my trip

Orion V CNG, Orion V Diesel, Orion VII CNG, Orion VII Hybrid, New Flyer D60, TMC RTS, Nova RTS

Bus Routes Covered on my trip

M5, M15, M104, Q66, Q101, Bx9, Bx17, Bx21, Bx36, B64

I'll post pictures and videos later.

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Nice meeting you again too, sucks Shane couldn't make it. Also sucks the 2004 CNG drivers were driving like pussies...Atleast we caught some New Flyer Vikings

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New Videos are up:

D60 on the Bx9

VII on the M104

R46 on the V

JFK AirTrain

Corona Yard/Casey Stengel Depot

R62 on the 3

R160B leaving Prospect Park on the Q

Diesel V on the Bx21

You can see my latest pictures on the Wiki

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Nice videos hl7534!

BTW if anyone is coming to NYC or is in NYC, hit me up, might show you where you can ride these awesome buses.

Bee-Line was better with the Flxibles.

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All right! - you want to talk about City of New York subway cars? here we go!

There was nothing, and there will never be anything on eight wheels that can touch the R-1's (my all time favorites).

Built beginning in 1930 and specifically for the new Independent lines in Manhattan and Queens, they featured all-steel construction, solid brass windows frames and very comfortable cane seating accompanied by acceleration and speed that I don't think can be duplicated today!

There were four manufacturers that produced the R-1's to the exact same city specifications including Pressed Steel Car Company, Pullman Standard, St. Louis Car Company and American Car and Foundry (ACF) of Berwick, Pennsylvania.

In fact, the only way even a trained eye (like mine) could tell them apart was by the builder's plates at each end of a car.

There was one more thing that was pretty nice; each car had 'City of New York' lettering in gold leaf on each side.

Now, I know that my detractors will say that the R-1's were O.K. in their day, but this is almost eighty years later. Well, let me tell you that with a little TLC those cars could still be running today, and that's a lot more than what can be said about today's equipment!

BTW; this writer has one of the four original porcelain number plates from car 1163.

All photos borrowed for educational purposes only.

Mr. Linsky - Green Bus Lines, Inc., Jamaica, NY

NYCR1.jpg

car100.jpg

SUBWAYWORLDSFAIR-3.jpg

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RSCN1792.jpg

This is one of Gun Hills finest!

100_5743.jpg

Same can be said for this bus, it may be a dreaded 1993 but it's in great condition.

RSCN1767.jpg

Rare West Farms 1993 Orion V.

DSCN1806.jpg

1990 TMC RTS that sadly will be retired soon.

100_5787.jpg

7672 still not fixed from fire.

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Are the 63xx hybrids from 2004 still running on their first battery?

I doubt it. Those have been the most troublesome of the hybrids (especially the ones assigned to Queens Village depot, for whatever reason).

OT: Lucky post #888!

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Are the 63xx hybrids from 2004 still running on their first battery?
Most likely no as they have been level II'd for the most part and many times these buses needed to be towed.

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If you ride the L train between Brooklyn and Manhattan at odd hours of the day, get ready for a little more automation in your lifestyle. As of today, the L will become the first NY subway line to be fully controlled by Communications Based Train Control, or CBTC, initially used overnights and during non-peak hours. It allows the trains to effectively run themselves, closer and faster than their meatbag conductors could otherwise, which should mean more trains more often. However, those fleshy conductors have something their robotic replacements don't: contracts. Because of that there will still be human conductors watching the controls and, we'd imagine, napping occasionally. At least they're not striking.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2009/02/24/robotra...-under-careful/

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N.Y. MTA raises fares, reduces service

New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Board today approved a series of resolutions that will allow the MTA to move forward with fare increases of 25 percent to 30 percent and service reductions that will affect customers throughout its service area. These actions were required to implement the balanced budget passed by the Board in December, which closed an approximately $1.2 billion deficit.

"...today, as we make a very difficult and distasteful set of decisions, we are doing so strengthened in the knowledge that no less than the future of the MTA and the region is at stake," said Elliot G. Sander, MTA Executive Director and CEO.

The fare and toll increases will be effective on the following dates:

* New York City Transit, MTA Bus and Long Island Bus (subway, buses and Staten Island Railway): May 31

* Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad: June 1

* MTA Bridges and Tunnels facilities: July 11

Service reductions will be phased in beginning in May. The full details of the fare increase and service changes are available at http://mta.info/mta/09/.

Source: http://www.metro-magazine.com/News/Story/2...es-service.aspx
Wabtec awarded N.Y. MTA railcar order

Wabtec Corp. has received additional option orders worth approximately $75 million to supply components for New York City subway cars being purchased under the Metropolitan Transit Authority’s R-160 program.

The orders represent components for the second option order of 382 cars, which are to be delivered over the next two years.

Under the R-160 program, New York City has now ordered 1,662 cars, which are being built by Alstom Transportation and Kawasaki. Wabtec has been supplying components for the previous cars and will now provide the same components for the 382 option cars, as follows: Wabtec Passenger Transit (brakes, couplers and current collectors); Vapor Stone (door operators and related equipment); Milufab (door panels) and Wabtec Railway Electronics (event recorders).

Source: http://www.metro-magazine.com/News/Story/2...lcar-order.aspx

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Are the 63xx hybrids from 2004 still running on their first battery?

Four of them now have lithium-ion batteries.

BTW A. Wong, here's the real shocker for the fare increase: Long Island Bus would go to $3.50 (fares in the city would rise to a reasonable $2.50 for local service). In addition, unlimited-ride MetroCards would no longer be accepted on buses under Long Island Bus.

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I don't know why MTA is going to do that to Long Island, all it will do is decrease ridership on buses and increase ridership on dollar vans.

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I hope the MTA does not buy those buses.

Double Decker buses are not needed.

It would be a waste buying those buses.

They won't be buying them they're too tall to maintain anyways in thier garages. Double deckers on an express route is stupid IMO anyway.

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I hope the MTA does not buy those buses.

Double Decker buses are not needed.

It would be a waste buying those buses.

Explain, please? I can understand this very well if it's just your opinion, but you're presenting it as a fact, which begs for evidence to back it up.

Double-decker buses work well in many cities across the globe, and there's no inherent quality that New York as a city possesses that would make them unfit for use.

Double-decker buses work very well on express routes as passengers don't board and alight as often as on local routes. At least for New York's express routes, passengers board at certain points along a route, the bus then runs express for a distance, and then passengers alight at certain other points. There's no other boarding or alighting taking place. And this would be perfect for double-decker buses.

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Explain, please? I can understand this very well if it's just your opinion, but you're presenting it as a fact, which begs for evidence to back it up.

Double-decker buses work well in many cities across the globe, and there's no inherent quality that New York as a city possesses that would make them unfit for use.

Double-decker buses work very well on express routes as passengers don't board and alight as often as on local routes. At least for New York's express routes, passengers board at certain points along a route, the bus then runs express for a distance, and then passengers alight at certain other points. There's no other boarding or alighting taking place. And this would be perfect for double-decker buses.

I know it wasn't exactly directed to me but still, the main problems I have with them is the height, and the fact that people in NYC take long to get off the bus, they will be at the upper level, wait until the bus stops and then run downstairs to get off and then wonder why the driver is pulling off already. It's one of the really annoying things to me about double deckers.

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