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Possible Subway/RT Extensions


125Drewry
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What subway/RT extension should be built?  

53 members have voted

  1. 1. Which extension do you think should be built?

    • University-Spadina extension to Vaughan
      22
    • Yonge extension to Richmond hill
      37
    • Scarborough RT extension to Markham
      26
    • Bloor-Danforth extension to Sherway Gardens
      19


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In all seriousness,

Finch extended to Barrie

Kipling extended to Niagara Falls

SRT extended to Port Perry

Spadina extended to Wasaga Beach

Sheppard extended west to Windsor and east to Oshawa

w00t.

I don't think that is reality thats more of a fantasy a BIG time fantasy. We can use Via to get to Niagara Falls, Windsor GO for Oshawa, Barrie and Port Perry and I'm sure Onatrio Northland or CanAr goes to Wasaga Beach

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okay I've thought it out a little better and I've come to the conclusion that it only benifits DRT riders so DRT so I'm thinking DRT should do the connections but I don't think STC is the right choice Rouge Hill are good choices. MT has Westwood, Long Branch and Islington to connect with TTC so I think DRT needs 3 aswell which is where the SRT comes in handy the should extend the SRT as far as Morningside and the you have the 901, 901A. 901 goes to Morningside Station, 901A would go to UTSC and 109 would serve Rouge Hill. okay it makes a little sense now.

Frankly, Durham Region will do fine without any TTC connections. People can go into downtown Toronto using GO Transit, which, though a bit more expensive, will get them to their destinations without transfers and a long commute. York Region is built with much of its population facing Toronto, which is why we have more connections to the TTC, not to mention our TTC buses are contracted. Durham is built away from Toronto, not to mention Rouge Park.

But before you want any fancy connections with the TTC, I suggest Durham Region fix up their "transit system" first.

Oh, and fix up your grammar.

Plus, you cannot compare DRT to MT, their system is much more optimal than DRT's, and most of their development meets Toronto's. Mississauga is also a city with a population of almost 700 000. Durham Region does not even have 600 000 people. So to compare MT to DRT would be absolutely wrong.

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Frankly, Durham Region will do fine without any TTC connections. People can go into downtown Toronto using GO Transit, which, though a bit more expensive, will get them to their destinations without transfers and a long commute. York Region is built with much of its population facing Toronto, which is why we have more connections to the TTC, not to mention our TTC buses are contracted. Durham is built away from Toronto, not to mention Rouge Park.

But before you want any fancy connections with the TTC, I suggest Durham Region fix up their "transit system" first.

Oh, and fix up your grammar.

Plus, you cannot compare DRT to MT, their system is much more optimal than DRT's, and most of their development meets Toronto's. Mississauga is also a city with a population of almost 700 000. Durham Region does not even have 600 000 people. So to compare MT to DRT would be absolutely wrong.

Actually connections with TTC would be very beneficial for short trips. Like a person who needs to get from Pickering to Scarborough. Durham may not touch Toronto as much as York, but it still does.

Also as said alreay DRT will have connections with Toronto and even York in the future.

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Buddy, he was being sarcastic.

I get it.

I met this guy from Parsons Brinckerhoff and he is a mega transit planner for Tampa Bay and he is friends with my aunt so I had the pleasure of meeting him, I started asking him questions like what do you think of transit here and so on... and he says that he just loves GO Transit he thought it had one of the best Motorcoach fleet in Canada. he also made a ranking list for personal preference of the top 100 Transit Systems in Canada and he decided based on overall best service and ridership that Mississauga Transit was the #1 transit system in Canada and he has done 3 years of research for this ranking list... he's been to Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Halifax, Calgary Edmonton, Winnipeg you name he's been there and out of all possible choices Mississauga was the best. and then I asked him about this topic what he thinks should happen and on of the first things he reconized was that there is no really good connections between Pickering and Scarborough besides the 94 and he asked me why that was and I couldn't give an answer. He says the SRT should be extended further east not into Durham and he thinks that the TTC should consider the the JFK Airtrain type for new SRT cars. I have a couple of booklets of his work if anybody would like to see them

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He says the SRT should be extended further east not into Durham and he thinks that the TTC should consider the the JFK Airtrain type for new SRT cars. I have a couple of booklets of his work if anybody would like to see them

There is quite a bit of speculation that Metrolinx will propose to build the Eglinton line using Bombardier ART technology. It has a capacity improvement over the vision of LRT the TTC has proposed, but costs will be higher (but not as high as a full fledged subway). Eastward expansion should be considered into Seaton to provide a local option to GO-type service along the railway.

As for cars, Mark II ART cars will be used for the SRT refurbishment, but its not clear if they will look like Vancouver's Mark IIs or more like JFK's.

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I get it.

I met this guy from Parsons Brinckerhoff and he is a mega transit planner for Tampa Bay and he is friends with my aunt so I had the pleasure of meeting him, I started asking him questions like what do you think of transit here and so on... and he says that he just loves GO Transit he thought it had one of the best Motorcoach fleet in Canada. he also made a ranking list for personal preference of the top 100 Transit Systems in Canada and he decided based on overall best service and ridership that Mississauga Transit was the #1 transit system in Canada and he has done 3 years of research for this ranking list... he's been to Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Halifax, Calgary Edmonton, Winnipeg you name he's been there and out of all possible choices Mississauga was the best. and then I asked him about this topic what he thinks should happen and on of the first things he reconized was that there is no really good connections between Pickering and Scarborough besides the 94 and he asked me why that was and I couldn't give an answer. He says the SRT should be extended further east not into Durham and he thinks that the TTC should consider the the JFK Airtrain type for new SRT cars. I have a couple of booklets of his work if anybody would like to see them

I find that hard to believe, unless he bases his opinion on "consistent paint scheme." :lol:

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There is quite a bit of speculation that Metrolinx will propose to build the Eglinton line using Bombardier ART technology.

This is why the next few months are going to be so interesting for Torontonians. Aside from the huge amount of attention that will be given to "How will we pay for all this stuff?", we will have the novel opportunity to look at the possibilities of a network. Until now, we have been used to debating lines in isolation, and there is not really any collective experience in saying "well if we build this here, then what effect will it have on this other project? Or that intersecting line?". Will the public take on this responsibility, usually reserved for planners and politicians behind closed doors?

Now we get to ask things like, is Eglinton going to be the only "crosstown" route? What about the CP midtown line? What about the 401 REX? Do we want to build two or three? How much can we afford? If 401 and CP are off the table, then a case can be made for Eglinton being more express than local. But I sure as heck would want to know why the others have been ruled out.

And does Metrolinx have a mandate to build lines that cannot be easily seen as interregional? Will all available transit cash be directed toward long haul lines, ignoring the value of local, short trips?

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This is why the next few months are going to be so interesting for Torontonians. Aside from the huge amount of attention that will be given to "How will we pay for all this stuff?", we will have the novel opportunity to look at the possibilities of a network. Until now, we have been used to debating lines in isolation, and there is not really any collective experience in saying "well if we build this here, then what effect will it have on this other project? Or that intersecting line?". Will the public take on this responsibility, usually reserved for planners and politicians behind closed doors?

Now we get to ask things like, is Eglinton going to be the only "crosstown" route? What about the CP midtown line? What about the 401 REX? Do we want to build two or three? How much can we afford? If 401 and CP are off the table, then a case can be made for Eglinton being more express than local. But I sure as heck would want to know why the others have been ruled out.

And does Metrolinx have a mandate to build lines that cannot be easily seen as interregional? Will all available transit cash be directed toward long haul lines, ignoring the value of local, short trips?

Very good questions.

Another question is, why would Metrolinx choose a technology that is proprietary, and (in my opinion) has seen limited success?

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Another question is, why would Metrolinx choose a technology that is proprietary, and (in my opinion) has seen limited success?

On the contrary, ART is very successful. Just not in Toronto, where its application was poorly implimented.

Dan

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I haven't seen this posted here yet: The Toronto Star reports that the average distance between stops on underground portions of the Eglinton LRT would be about 850 m, which is quite a bit longer than we're seeing for the other lines. The reasons are pretty obvious - costs of building stations - but the public reaction has already been somewhat negative.

http://www.thestar.com/article/475187

What I don't understand, and am hoping for clarification soon when the TTC posts their boards, is why the average speed will only be 22 km/h. I would imagine that an underground LRT with that kind of spacing should attain near subway-level speeds since there will be no delays for traffic lights. EDIT: Just been reading Steve Munro's blog and there is some thought over there that 22 km/h is the average speed for the whole route, not just for the underground portions.

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I haven't seen this posted here yet: The Toronto Star reports that the average distance between stops on underground portions of the Eglinton LRT would be about 850 m, which is quite a bit longer than we're seeing for the other lines. The reasons are pretty obvious - costs of building stations - but the public reaction has already been somewhat negative.

http://www.thestar.com/article/475187

What I don't understand, and am hoping for clarification soon when the TTC posts their boards, is why the average speed will only be 22 km/h. I would imagine that an underground LRT with that kind of spacing should attain near subway-level speeds since there will be no delays for traffic lights. EDIT: Just been reading Steve Munro's blog and there is some thought over there that 22 km/h is the average speed for the whole route, not just for the underground portions.

That 22km/h figure is projected for the entire length of the route, end to end, with 400-450m average stop spacing.

If the TTC is still projecting that kind of average speed with stops every 800+m on Eglinton, that would imply that stops on the surface-running portion of the route would be far closer together. And it would also indicate that some sort of surface transit will be maintained on the tunnelled portion of the route.

Dan

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If the TTC is still projecting that kind of average speed with stops every 800+m on Eglinton, that would imply that stops on the surface-running portion of the route would be far closer together. And it would also indicate that some sort of surface transit will be maintained on the tunnelled portion of the route.

Which would put Eglinton, the longest route in the TC network, in the position of having a shorter stop spacing than the other routes on its surface portion. This doesn't seem to make much sense, although I agree with you that it is a logical outcome of the information we have at this point.

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That 22km/h figure is projected for the entire length of the route, end to end, with 400-450m average stop spacing.

If the TTC is still projecting that kind of average speed with stops every 800+m on Eglinton, that would imply that stops on the surface-running portion of the route would be far closer together. And it would also indicate that some sort of surface transit will be maintained on the tunnelled portion of the route.

Dan

Yes im guessing bus service will be like on Sheppard between Yonge and Donmills when its open

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