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Night time pictures


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Showing off :blink::rolleyes::D

In true Orion VIII style, none were taken with a tripod, but the steady hands and hat beak method. The last 3 were not taken at night, but rather in the dark of York Mills Station, York Mills Station and St Clair Station.

Click thumnail to enjoy ;)

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Are those fellow transit fans next to 7757?

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I was out the other night and had my camera with me. The first one is of a new Nova LFS, 964 in the Tim Horton's parking lot, the second one is of D40LF 741 working the Barrydowne Cambrian. If I didn't have tinted windows on my truck, they both would of been a little brighter, but oh well, I tried!

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Ok. Question for you all. It's not really transit related but this is being posted in the General Photography forum.

Anyhow, any idea how one would take a picture of dark objects behind a dark background? Basically I got a couple of sceneries that look good at say 5:30-6am when the sun is just barley up yet but when you take the pic it's all dark and if you use a flash it's only the first few feet in front of you that light up. It's basically a farmland with some trees at the end of it. Any idea how you could make that work to take the picture of exactly what the eyes are seeing?

EDIT: Anyone that knows the area of Kennedy Road and Bur Oak may know what I'm talking about.

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Ok. Question for you all. It's not really transit related but this is being posted in the General Photography forum.

Anyhow, any idea how one would take a picture of dark objects behind a dark background? Basically I got a couple of sceneries that look good at say 5:30-6am when the sun is just barley up yet but when you take the pic it's all dark and if you use a flash it's only the first few feet in front of you that light up. It's basically a farmland with some trees at the end of it. Any idea how you could make that work to take the picture of exactly what the eyes are seeing?

Sounds like the main problem is lighting. I would try to get an angle that allows the most light to shine on the object or in the direction you're shooting (the age old rule, shoot with the sun at your back).

A quick example with a photo or two I have, one taken with the sunset at my back, and another a few minutes later shooting at the sunset.

Also if you have a more advanced camera, you can set it to have a longer exposure or night mode to try and give the camera more time to capture the existing light. A firm surface or a tripod is handy to avoid camera shake/blurriness.

That's just a quick suggestion or two, the techies with experience probably have more ideas/suggestions.

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Pulled off some damn near impossible photo-ops this evening in downtown Vancouver. I was after the NVTC Classics which are on their way out the door... and needless to say, getting photos of them involved resorting to desperate measures. I was surprised at how nicely they turned out. :D

N4125

N4127 - panned!

N4157

N4173

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