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Camrose getting public transit


A. Wong
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Heard on my favorite radio station this morning (98.1 CAM FM based in Camrose) that they are getting public transit service soon thanks to government funding. I missed the details about exactly when or the cost, but they said they would get 3 18-24 passenger transit buses with wheelchair lifts.

Some more details at: http://news.gc.ca/web/view/en/index.jsp?ar...y=News+Releases

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Heard on my favorite radio station this morning (98.1 CAM FM based in Camrose) that they are getting public transit service soon thanks to government funding. I missed the details about exactly when or the cost, but they said they would get 3 18-24 passenger transit buses with wheelchair lifts.

Some more details at: http://news.gc.ca/web/view/en/index.jsp?ar...y=News+Releases

Well it's about time I think. Looking forward to pictures when the service starts.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Camrose to wheel out transit system in 2009

The Edmonton Journal

Wednesday, January 30, 2008

EDMONTON - Camrose will soon boast one of Canada's smallest transit systems.

Brian Hamblin, city manager for this central Alberta city of 16,000, said Tuesday that Camrose will start running three buses of 18-to-24 passengers in "starter transit system" in 2009.

The transit system, a pilot project announced recently by Camrose, is being made possible by a $333,000 grant from the federal-provincial infrastructure program.

Camrose, which issued $100 million worth of building permits in 2007, including 300 units of housing, has definitely reached the threshold where public transit makes sense, Hamblin said.

It will take over a year to get off the ground, largely because the necessity to add bus pullout lanes to 48th Avenue, Camrose's main street.

Hamblin said the need for transit is partly related to the growth of the Augustana Campus of the University of Alberta, which has 1,000 students and is expected to double in the next few years.

© The Edmonton Journal 2008

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Are bus pull out lanes even needed for such a small system?

Probably, 48th avenue where they need them is also known as Highway 13, and has fairly high volumes of truck traffic. Speed limit is likely only 50, but for safety sake pullouts are probably a good idea.

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  • 2 months later...

http://www.camrosecanadian.com/News/397910.html

Council drops public transit

Nicole Madu

Staff Reporter

Sunday May 04, 2008

After much deliberation, City Council voted against the continued planning for a fixed-route public transit system during the regular council meeting, April 28.

With a full gallery of spectators, the decision to cut the project wasn’t made easily. Councillors Ina Nielson, Max Lindstrand and John Howard were in favour of keeping the project a priority, while the rest of the councilors, as well as the mayor, out-voted them to defeat the motion.

The defeated motion included the trial project that would operate on an 18-month period, subject to funding approval in the 2009 budget and development of appropriate success/failure criteria for the trial.

Funding

Funding was obtained from the Canada-Alberta Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (CAMRIF) that will now be returned because the project is not going ahead at this time. This funding was given a signing agreement deadline of June 30, with final project completion before March 31, 2010.

Many objections and issues surrounding the project were brought up during the council meeting, including issues of ridership, feasibility and overall deficits that the system could generate.

“We cannot even determine the costs accurately right now,” said city engineer Ted Gillespie. “The revenue numbers are even more difficult.”

Administration used information from a feasibility study done by D.A. Watt Consulting, as well as case study results in the Town of Hinton to reproduce three models for a transit system.

High risk

The results were daunting to councilors, showing that a deficit of $900,000 could be generated by the trial alone. While CAMRIF funding was secured, it represents only five to seven per cent of the overall project cost.

More at:

http://www.camrosecanadian.com/News/397910.html

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By Mark Crown, Camrose Canadian

Thursday, September 25, 2014 1:22:31 MDT PM

The community transit advisory committee, led by chair Tony Hladun, presented a report to council at the Sept. 15 committee of the whole meeting that outlined plans for a two-bus public transit system which would run on a 30 minute loop.

[...]

1297610774640_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&si

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  • 10 months later...

Camrose is initiating a subsidized taxi program instead of a public transit system. The system will be token-based. Three cab companies are participating. Riders pay for a taxi ride with a token (face value $4), and the Taxi company submits the tokens for reembursement. The service was supposed to commence 01 September 2015, but I found the information on the 08 September city council agenda.

Here's the key page clipped out of the Council Agenda.

camrose.png

It's not clear to me from the description if the tokens will be given away or sold, or if they will be available to the general public or just to means-tested recipients. The City of Camrose has a population of 17,286 [2011 Census].

(And now I need this token for my transit token collection!)

On an unrelated note, the Town of Bashaw (population 873 [2011 Census]) has twice weekly bus service to Camrose (59 km/40 min. away according to Google). It's operated by a non-profit registered charity called the Bashaw Bus Society and it's apparently been on the road since 2013. The service is open to anyone.

Here's their bus (from facebook):

1277928_659220444098382_1806656342_o.jpg

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  • 1 year later...

Camrose introduced a limited scheduled fixed route bus service circa April 2016. The Camrose Community Bus began operating just two half days per week. In the months since it has been expanded several times so that from 18 February 2017 the bus was operating four days per week (Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays), 9AM to 5PM. Fare was originally $4 but has been lowered to $2.

link (pdf)

There has been some (outside) effort to attract U of A Augustana campus riders, including a ticket give-away, but the hours of operation are much more oriented to daytime travel by seniors, etc, than for commuters going to and from work.

camrose-CCB-newspaper.thumb.jpg.e4b25f64ed8503e5023cd4ec58b59d27.jpg

(above image clipped from a 31 January 2017 article in the Camrose Canadian).

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  • 1 year later...

The Camrose Connector started service yesterday. Service is contracted to Red Arrow/ PWT who operate 3 round trips per day. $20 one way fare with stops in Edmonton at Southgate, Red Arrow south side, the University Hospital and University Transit Centre. 

According to the tender, all fare revenue goes to Camrose, so, presumably that fare is set by the City. Granted, who knows what could have happened during negotiating with PWT.

No signage at the University Transit Centre (ie on bus stop flags) yet.

DSC09060.thumb.jpg.6dfa19eccaab24efa79b8c783a857a49.jpg

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