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Enzo Aquarius
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2 hours ago, Willy2133 said:

Oh yeah, I asked a few CSA’s I know about this post a few weeks ago, I got a “no” from one and a “that’s bullshit” from another one. I would like to believe this but I do have my doubts that it’s true. Especially since it’s now thanksgiving weekend and we haven’t heard anything.

I’m guessing some of this has been delayed as there are still cancellations happening 7 days a week. I talked to a csa who was in a class in August and out of 15 people in the class he was the only one left. Can’t get people working, can’t expand service. Guess we will see in the spring maybe. 

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Oct 9
It been 11 years since I last shot this locomotive pushing an Westbound Train A Port Credit

GOT 647 was a hell lot quitter than 671 that was real loud arriving at PC and became quitter after starting to move again. Have never heard 671 been this loud every time I have seen it to date.

133A3007.JPG133A3008.JPG133a3010-jpg.432034

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14 minutes ago, Orion V said:

The current batch of BiLevels VIII, why didn't GO number the regular coaches and accessible cars as 3xxx and 35xx since their cab counterparts are numbered 3xx? Why skip a 1000 numerically?

Avoid a conflict with the UP cars in the 3000 series.

I agree though, in hindsight the cab cars should've come as 4xx, but they were ordered well in advance of any regular coaches.

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Thoughts after using the Kipling Terminal:

Why wasn't the underground tunnel extended from the bus terminal and exit to the GO train platform?  The elevation difference is probably much shorter going under instead of over as it doesn't have to deal with clearance for the bilevel cars and their eventual electrification.  It's 4 flights of stair up vs. only 2 going down.  Was the possibility of extended TTC's Line 2 westward a factor in choosing to go with a bridge vs. a tunnel?

With the removal of the ticket counter at Kipling GO does the door from the TTC hallway to the South parking lot lock automatically?  There was a delayed train (which was the final inbound trip of the day)  I was trying to catch and the doors were locked despite people still waiting on the platform.  Thankfully there was enough time for me to get to the GO Train platform through the bus terminal.

There really should be a train departure screen inside the bus terminal.  You don't see one until you've crossed the bridge over to the GO Train platform.  Metrolinx has gone to the trouble of having bus and train platforms all have unique platform numbers within each station.  However, much like at Union Station use separate departure screens, again sometimes not side-by-side meaning you have to hunt for them.  With the few GO services at Kipling, simply clearly indicating which services are trains and which are bus on the departure screen would make for a better customer experience.  The few GO bus services into Kipling are timed to allow for transfers to the inbound GO train, but first-time users can easily miss the one sign directing you to the train platform and there's no departure information in the bus terminal itself.

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1 hour ago, Cityflyer said:

On weekends with the current schedule, do the Stouffville and Barrie lines interline their trains with through runs at Union Station? Also, does the same holds true for the Lakeshore West and East trains? How many trains are used in total for each line?

It is true that on weekends/holidays that the Barrie and Stouffville lines do interline at Union Station along with Lakeshore West and East lines changing at Union Station.  

For the case of a Barrie line changing into Stouffville, the CSA (customer service ambassador) sometimes may announce "this train will be temporarily out of service while it changes in to the Stouffville line." Passengers have to disembark and re-board the train once it appears on the departure screen.

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16 hours ago, GTAmissions1 said:

It is true that on weekends/holidays that the Barrie and Stouffville lines do interline at Union Station along with Lakeshore West and East lines changing at Union Station.  

For the case of a Barrie line changing into Stouffville, the CSA (customer service ambassador) sometimes may announce "this train will be temporarily out of service while it changes in to the Stouffville line." Passengers have to disembark and re-board the train once it appears on the departure screen.

Why can't passengers stay on the train? Does it goes out of Union Station then goes back in to another platform or just sits there to change its destination signs?

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On 10/10/2022 at 11:33 PM, brianc1981 said:

I’m guessing some of this has been delayed as there are still cancellations happening 7 days a week. I talked to a csa who was in a class in August and out of 15 people in the class he was the only one left. Can’t get people working, can’t expand service. Guess we will see in the spring maybe. 

Good grief. What's causing this? It's certainly a good job market. But why are people not even finishing training?

What's the pay like for a CSA?

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15 hours ago, nfitz said:

Good grief. What's causing this? It's certainly a good job market. But why are people not even finishing training?

What's the pay like for a CSA?

This thread gives a decent look into CSA, apparently pay and hours aren’t ideal and there’s the seniority issues with work as well (however that’s all agencies). It seems that it’s also contracted out, although it might be to Alstom/bombardier. 
 

 

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On 10/14/2022 at 8:51 AM, Cityflyer said:

Why can't passengers stay on the train? Does it goes out of Union Station then goes back in to another platform or just sits there to change its destination signs?

Destination signs would be useful on the trains, but instead of at the front, they should be at the doors, ideally at eye-level for people on the platform.  This is more useful at Union Station where there are trains on different tracks with adjoining platforms and the screens may not be easily visible.  For the first-time or casual users it's a reassurance that they are boarding the right train.  A sign similar to what's seen on most of the accessible cars which display the next/current station.  In an ideal world I'd like for them to use the line colour either as the background or text colour, or simply as a coloured square or circle to quickly identify the trains in case you don't see the destination.  The two-letter designations for each line aren't distinct enough to differentiate from all the other text on the sign (since they don't have route numbers). 

I'd be happy with one on each side of the car if not at each door, as they should be legible when the train slows down to a stop at each station from the previous car or door.  A small part of me was hoping when they put those lights above each track at Union Station that there would be some sort of digital signage indicating where the train was going.  The display screens are fine, but again there aren't enough of them and some of the platforms are narrow enough that the screens block one another when they're staggered.  I don't know that switching to the screen layout at bus platforms which display the major stops vertically would instead of how they're currently listed across the screen given the number of stations on some of the lines.  Colour again on those screens would also help, as when you're rushing to catch your train they all look the same simply with varying lengths of text.

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Anyone know why it takes 6 years to work up to start training for a Loco engineer? Seems like an awfully long time to stick it out for that. I'm assuming the pay reflects the time gone into it, but for example, VIA advertises 2 years to become an apprentice loco engineer (based off a quick look at their site...I believe you need a 2 years experience as a conductor). Heck, I think you can become a commercial pilot faster. 

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I guess UP ridership must be down. I usually recharge my Presto cards using cash at the machines at Long Branch. The receipts are printed with the grey UP logo, not the green GO stuff. I guess it has to be used somewhere.

Yesterday, when we were in the Weston/Lawrence area, we took a bathroom break at the UP station.

UP, IP, we all P!

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18 hours ago, Doppelkupplung said:

Anyone know why it takes 6 years to work up to start training for a Loco engineer? Seems like an awfully long time to stick it out for that. I'm assuming the pay reflects the time gone into it, but for example, VIA advertises 2 years to become an apprentice loco engineer (based off a quick look at their site...I believe you need a 2 years experience as a conductor). Heck, I think you can become a commercial pilot faster. 

It doesn't. Well, not specifically.

 

But because the advancement of the crews from CSA to Conductor to Engineer is based not just on the time served, but also based on the need at those positions, there is only a minimum theoretical defined period that it can take. For instance, the absolute minimum amount of time it would take for a new hire to become an Engineer is 3 years......but that is basically unheard of. The only minimum terms that are required are one year as a CSA, and two years as a conductor.

 

 

In the case of VIA it's trickier, as they don't have a conductor on their trains - both of the crews up in the cab are engineers and are trained and treated as such. Onboard crews are not part of the running trades, and are subject to a different set of regulations (and hours-of-work rules). Thus the need for anyone hiring there to have been a conductor for 2 years first - as that is the Transport Canada rule.

 

Dan

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Does the conductor and engineer both move over to the cab car whenever it switches directions at the end of the line or the conductor always sit in the logo since that person doesn't drive the train?

If they both goes to the cab car when it switches directions, how do both of them sit in the 1st gen cab cars when it was only half the width of the car back then?

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10 minutes ago, Cityflyer said:

Does the conductor and engineer both move over to the cab car whenever it switches directions at the end of the line or the conductor always sit in the logo since that person doesn't drive the train?

Yes.

10 minutes ago, Cityflyer said:

If they both goes to the cab car when it switches directions, how do both of them sit in the 1st gen cab cars when it was only half the width of the car back then?

The second head-end crew member did sit nearby, but didn't have their own dedicated seat like in the rebuilt cab cars.

 

But on some trains, the second head-end crew member was in charge of the doors, so they didn't need a seat near the cab anyways.

 

Dan

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Just now, smallspy said:

Yes.

The second head-end crew member did sit nearby, but didn't have their own dedicated seat like in the rebuilt cab cars.

 

But on some trains, the second head-end crew member was in charge of the doors, so they didn't need a seat near the cab anyways.

 

Dan

What did they do when there was only one window?

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2 hours ago, smallspy said:

Yes.

The second head-end crew member did sit nearby, but didn't have their own dedicated seat like in the rebuilt cab cars.

 

But on some trains, the second head-end crew member was in charge of the doors, so they didn't need a seat near the cab anyways.

 

Dan

So when the conductor was in charge of the doors, there didn't need to be a CSA present on that trainset?

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Question?

Not being from the GTA and not knowing any GO or other transit systems schedules or routes, but on the GO train Lakeshore line can you take a train(far west[ beginning west starting point]take the same train to the furthest east point[where line ends east point]with out having to transfer at Union Station)?

or

Do you need to transfer at Union and how long does it take to go from Starting point West to ending point East?

 

Just curious?

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5 hours ago, Cityflyer said:

So when the conductor was in charge of the doors, there didn't need to be a CSA present on that trainset?

The CSA position was created when Bombardier took over. Prior to that, generally it was a brakeman who operated the doors - which is a running trade. The engineer and conductor sit at the front.

 

The exception being on the Milton Line, where CP had negotiated that they would only use 2-man crews and the conductor was the one in charge of the doors. (How they managed to confirm the signal indications was beyond me.)

 

2 hours ago, MCIBUS said:

Question?

Not being from the GTA and not knowing any GO or other transit systems schedules or routes, but on the GO train Lakeshore line can you take a train(far west[ beginning west starting point]take the same train to the furthest east point[where line ends east point]with out having to transfer at Union Station)?

or

Do you need to transfer at Union and how long does it take to go from Starting point West to ending point East?

 

Just curious?

The simple answer is "it depends".

 

Most of the trains at off-peak periods run through from east to west and vice-versa, although sometimes they won't - they'll require you to walk across a platform to a waiting train.

 

At peak periods - and especially before COVID - fewer of the trains would run through.

 

Dan

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2 hours ago, smallspy said:

The CSA position was created when Bombardier took over. Prior to that, generally it was a brakeman who operated the doors - which is a running trade. The engineer and conductor sit at the front.

 

The exception being on the Milton Line, where CP had negotiated that they would only use 2-man crews and the conductor was the one in charge of the doors. (How they managed to confirm the signal indications was beyond me.)

 

The simple answer is "it depends".

 

Most of the trains at off-peak periods run through from east to west and vice-versa, although sometimes they won't - they'll require you to walk across a platform to a waiting train.

 

At peak periods - and especially before COVID - fewer of the trains would run through.

 

Dan

Can they open the doors from the cab? But then they cannot deploy the wheel chair ramp. So how is that complaint with a 2 man operation?

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