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I was reading on another website (http://gokw.org/) plans by GO Transit to introduce additional service this September between Guelph and York U via Meadowvale and Bramalea and Guelph and Cooksville via Square One. The first route seems like an extension of the 407 West service. The second extension seems a little stranger to me. First, I will assume that the buses are running express from Guelph to Mississauga on the 401. I've ridden the local from Brampton to Guelph. While it is a scenic trip, it is LONG. From the 401 how will the get to Square One? Via 407, Winston Churchill or Erin Mills and the 403 or straight down Hurontario? Secondly, why terminate at Cooksville? Just for a rail connection as Square One doesn't have one? Couldn't the route run into any of the other stations in northwest Mississauga or is it simply a matter of timing for the route? In which case, could it be solved by departing a few minutes earlier? This service would've been great for a friend who used to go to Guelph. Unfortunately it's coming too late to be of any use. Any thoughts?

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  • 2 weeks later...
I was reading on another website (http://gokw.org/) plans by GO Transit to introduce additional service this September between Guelph and York U via Meadowvale and Bramalea and Guelph and Cooksville via Square One. The first route seems like an extension of the 407 West service.

This service is just an extension of the existing York U. to Meadowvale express bus on selected trips, stopping only at the new Aberfoyle Park & Ride (as well as Bramalea and Meadowvale Stations as before). The running time from York to University of Guelph is 1:40.

The second extension seems a little stranger to me. First, I will assume that the buses are running express from Guelph to Mississauga on the 401.

This route will operate from the University of Guelph, south on Brock Rd. to serve the Aberfoyle Park & Ride lot, then east on Hwys. 401, 407 and 403 to Square One, and south Cooksville GO Station. Running time is 60-70 minutes, depending on time of day.

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This route will operate from the University of Guelph, south on Brock Rd. to serve the Aberfoyle Park & Ride lot, then east on Hwys. 401, 407 and 403 to Square One, and south Cooksville GO Station. Running time is 60-70 minutes, depending on time of day.

This will be handy, even for those of us coming/going to/from Kitchener-Waterloo. It will be much better than the local Georgetown bus.

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Which corridor will the Guelph-Cooksville route fall under? Milton or Georgetown? The York U-Guelph will obvously be in the 407 West timetable. If GO were to begin service into Kitchener-Waterloo, which corridor would provide the service? I know a lot of people on the Milton line live in K-W as the train station is closer. The Georgetown corridor does provide service into Guelph, but I'm thinking that the long trip and the transfer at Georgetown, Mount Pleasant, or Brampton may be a deterrant for some. I don't know if this is actually true or not, as I'm going with anecdotal evidence.

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If GO were to begin service into Kitchener-Waterloo, which corridor would provide the service? I know a lot of people on the Milton line live in K-W as the train station is closer. The Georgetown corridor does provide service into Guelph, but I'm thinking that the long trip and the transfer at Georgetown, Mount Pleasant, or Brampton may be a deterrant for some. I don't know if this is actually true or not, as I'm going with anecdotal evidence.

You could, instead of transferring from train to bus, just take the bus from Union (assuming that you're starting at Union).

Looking at a map, I can see that rail service could be provided to Kitchener from either the Milton or the Georgetown Line. My guess, based entirely on examination of the region in Google Earth, is that service will be provided on the Georgetown Line. In this way, there could be a train station in Guelph, one in Kitchener, and then it would be only a short journey to Cambridge from there. If train service were provided to Kitchener through the Milton Line, the train would have to make a relatively awkward journey, would be required to pass through Cambridge first, and would be unable to make any useful stops along the way.

It is however my understanding that GO Transit will not provide service to Kitchener in the forseeable future. The intention here is to help avoid making Kitchener-Waterloo a "bedroom community" for the GTA, and this is a very important goal considering our nation's incredibly low density. Do I support GO making a move to K-W? Yes, but not in a way that would be it convenient for daily commuters.

Since VIA Rail is clearly not about to become capable of environment-saving train connections within Ontario, it is my opinion also that GO Transit should become a provider of transportation to travelers as well as commuters. Where should GO Transit ultimately go? Everywhere that has train tracks. Take the GO train to Windsor? Yes. Somebody (the provincial government) is going to have to deal with a monetary loss - hey, didn't the federal government have an $8 billion surplus a few years back?

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You could, instead of transferring from train to bus, just take the bus from Union (assuming that you're starting at Union).

Looking at a map, I can see that rail service could be provided to Kitchener from either the Milton or the Georgetown Line. My guess, based entirely on examination of the region in Google Earth, is that service will be provided on the Georgetown Line. In this way, there could be a train station in Guelph, one in Kitchener, and then it would be only a short journey to Cambridge from there. If train service were provided to Kitchener through the Milton Line, the train would have to make a relatively awkward journey, would be required to pass through Cambridge first, and would be unable to make any useful stops along the way.

It is however my understanding that GO Transit will not provide service to Kitchener in the forseeable future. The intention here is to help avoid making Kitchener-Waterloo a "bedroom community" for the GTA, and this is a very important goal considering our nation's incredibly low density. Do I support GO making a move to K-W? Yes, but not in a way that would be it convenient for daily commuters.

Since VIA Rail is clearly not about to become capable of environment-saving train connections within Ontario, it is my opinion also that GO Transit should become a provider of transportation to travelers as well as commuters. Where should GO Transit ultimately go? Everywhere that has train tracks. Take the GO train to Windsor? Yes. Somebody (the provincial government) is going to have to deal with a monetary loss - hey, didn't the federal government have an $8 billion surplus a few years back?

According to the newspapers, The GO Train Will never be going to Kitchener at all. All newspaper articles on the matter have made it clear that if GO Train comes to Waterloo Region, the stop will be at the "Delta" or on Dobbie Drive. Then of course there is about 30 million different places they could bring the bus.

Once the new Greyhound Terminal is completed, Greyhound will be offering service between Cambridge and the Milton Train Station.

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"Delta" or on Dobbie Drive

These are places in Cambridge, for those unaware.

Then of course there is about 30 million different places they could bring the bus.

Similar to how Greyhound has "about 30 million different" stops in the Region.

Once the new Greyhound Terminal is completed, Greyhound will be offering service between Cambridge and the Milton Train Station.

That's helpful for people living in Cambridge. It's a start for the rest of us too.

I have attached a map that shows the rail link between Milton's GO Train station, and Waterloo Region. The cross-like shape is downtown Kitchener. The L-like shape below the cross marks Cambridge.

GO_Transit_rail_to_KW_from_Milton_Line.jpg

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You could, instead of transferring from train to bus, just take the bus from Union (assuming that you're starting at Union).

Looking at a map, I can see that rail service could be provided to Kitchener from either the Milton or the Georgetown Line. My guess, based entirely on examination of the region in Google Earth, is that service will be provided on the Georgetown Line. In this way, there could be a train station in Guelph, one in Kitchener, and then it would be only a short journey to Cambridge from there. If train service were provided to Kitchener through the Milton Line, the train would have to make a relatively awkward journey, would be required to pass through Cambridge first, and would be unable to make any useful stops along the way.

It is however my understanding that GO Transit will not provide service to Kitchener in the forseeable future. The intention here is to help avoid making Kitchener-Waterloo a "bedroom community" for the GTA, and this is a very important goal considering our nation's incredibly low density. Do I support GO making a move to K-W? Yes, but not in a way that would be it convenient for daily commuters.

Since VIA Rail is clearly not about to become capable of environment-saving train connections within Ontario, it is my opinion also that GO Transit should become a provider of transportation to travelers as well as commuters. Where should GO Transit ultimately go? Everywhere that has train tracks. Take the GO train to Windsor? Yes. Somebody (the provincial government) is going to have to deal with a monetary loss - hey, didn't the federal government have an $8 billion surplus a few years back?

Your understanding that GO Transit will not provide service to K-W is wrong, I've debunked that myth several times on this board, and frankly (no offense to you personally) I'm starting to get sick of debunking it. The Region's own plans provide for two eventual links to GO Transit (via Georgetown and via Milton), particularly in their Rapid Transit Plan, several other reports by Regional staff also support GO Transit Service to the Region, to say otherwise is false.

As for service options, it would be very difficult and very impractical for GO service to Kitchener to be provided by the Milton Corridor, once leaving the CP main line in Cambridge, that line is typically just one rail most of the way to Downtown Kitchener and not conducive to high-speed train travel, it is also heavily used by freights pulling cars out of Toyota, and car frames out of Kitchener Frame Ltd. (formerly Budd Canada) on Homer Watson Blvd. All that is moot anyways, once the Region proceeds with it's rapid transit line construction, the link between K-W and Cambridge will be satisifed anyways.

According to the newspapers, The GO Train Will never be going to Kitchener at all. All newspaper articles on the matter have made it clear that if GO Train comes to Waterloo Region, the stop will be at the "Delta" or on Dobbie Drive. Then of course there is about 30 million different places they could bring the bus.

Once the new Greyhound Terminal is completed, Greyhound will be offering service between Cambridge and the Milton Train Station.

Again, a misconception...also, please post the newspapers articles that say that. When GO Rail service comes to Waterloo Region (whether it be 1, 10 or 100 years from now) service will almost positively be provided from Milton to Cambridge first, after which we would see the extension of the Georgetown Corridor to Kitchener via Guelph, the Region's rapid transit plans, and previous provincial diagrams provide for both links to the Region in the long-term. If anything, the Gryhound bus service will buiold ridership to a point where GO Rail service is needed, GO has said this in the past, that bus service would be provided before rail service to build ridership. It just happens to be that under this scenario, Greyhound will provide the link, but unless we start seeing Greyhound trains, GO will eventually be in the position to offer Rail service to Cambridge.

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I think that Milton definately warrants all day service, considering that it is heavily used, and that once the new loco's come, it'll get the 12 car trains.

Regarding GO coming to Waterloo Region, how long before we'll be seeing GO buses, or even trains in Kitchener and Cambridge? 5, 10 years? I know that the region has rapid transit as one of it's main priorities, but I think that the regional chair and the mayor of Kitchener should be more supportive of GO coming to Waterloo Region (to reduce road congestion and air pollution).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Check out this article:

GO to review region's rail options (Waterloo Region)

THANA DHARMARAJAH

Guelph Mercury

GUELPH

Go Transit will study an extension of its Toronto commuter rail service to Waterloo Region.

Yesterday, as GO Transit director and CEO Gary McNeil announced two new GO bus routes to and from the University of Guelph, he said that an environmental assessment will be done to bring rail service to Guelph and on into Kitchener.

The assessment will identify possible rail station sites, study the impact of noise and vibration and identify a capital cost, McNeil said.

GO Transit officials will choose a consultant in February for the nine-month assessment.

McNeil said it might be at least three years before the commuter rail service can be extended, which is an optimistic timeline given that they'll need to secure funding from both the province and the federal government.

In the newly-constructed Aberfoyle Park-and-Ride lot, McNeil spoke about the assessment following the announcement of the extended GO Transit bus service to begin next Monday.

The park-and-ride facility in Aberfoyle includes 185 parking spots.

It's the first phase of an intercity terminal to be built on the site, McNeil said, which will cater to GO Transit buses and Greyhound buses.

With the beginning of the school year, GO will run nine trips a day from the University of Guelph to the Cooksville GO station.

Eight buses will run daily on the second route, from the university to York University. In total, the routes will carry about 450 passengers daily.

There are also connections for riders to head straight to Union Station in downtown Toronto.

It will cost a rider about $11 to get to York University or Union Station and about $22 for a day pass.

GO Transit's environmental assessment coincides with a GTA west transportation corridor study, which the Ministry of Transportation is conducting, looking at all transportation forms west of Toronto.

For a complete schedule of the two new routes visit www.gotransit.ca

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Check out this article:

GO to review region's rail options (Waterloo Region)

THANA DHARMARAJAH

Guelph Mercury

GUELPH

Go Transit will study an extension of its Toronto commuter rail service to Waterloo Region.

Yesterday, as GO Transit director and CEO Gary McNeil announced two new GO bus routes to and from the University of Guelph, he said that an environmental assessment will be done to bring rail service to Guelph and on into Kitchener.

The assessment will identify possible rail station sites, study the impact of noise and vibration and identify a capital cost, McNeil said.

GO Transit officials will choose a consultant in February for the nine-month assessment.

McNeil said it might be at least three years before the commuter rail service can be extended, which is an optimistic timeline given that they'll need to secure funding from both the province and the federal government.

In the newly-constructed Aberfoyle Park-and-Ride lot, McNeil spoke about the assessment following the announcement of the extended GO Transit bus service to begin next Monday.

The park-and-ride facility in Aberfoyle includes 185 parking spots.

It's the first phase of an intercity terminal to be built on the site, McNeil said, which will cater to GO Transit buses and Greyhound buses.

With the beginning of the school year, GO will run nine trips a day from the University of Guelph to the Cooksville GO station.

Eight buses will run daily on the second route, from the university to York University. In total, the routes will carry about 450 passengers daily.

There are also connections for riders to head straight to Union Station in downtown Toronto.

It will cost a rider about $11 to get to York University or Union Station and about $22 for a day pass.

GO Transit's environmental assessment coincides with a GTA west transportation corridor study, which the Ministry of Transportation is conducting, looking at all transportation forms west of Toronto.

For a complete schedule of the two new routes visit www.gotransit.ca

Here Here

I hope this settles any and all argument on the issue of GO to Waterloo Region, but I have my doubts.

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Here Here

I hope this settles any and all argument on the issue of GO to Waterloo Region, but I have my doubts.

Huh? Settles what? It's just a study, and it may take at least 3 years for something, anything to be implemented after that. In politics, that's a lifetime.

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Huh? Settles what? It's just a study, and it may take at least 3 years for something, anything to be implemented after that. In politics, that's a lifetime.

As i recall, everyone was arguing over the government (all levels) wanting GO expansion into waterloo. This makes it clear that at least one government agency is in favour of it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sorry for bringing up an old thread, but I have a question about the GO Lakeshore Electrification. It says that it will shave 15 minutes off a trip. I was just wondering where the 15 minutes would be shaven off? Do they mean getting from Oshawa to Hamilton 15 minutes earlier, or getting from Oshawa or Hamilton to Union 15 minutes earlier? Thanks.

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Sorry for bringing up an old thread, but I have a question about the GO Lakeshore Electrification. It says that it will shave 15 minutes off a trip. I was just wondering where the 15 minutes would be shaven off? Do they mean getting from Oshawa to Hamilton 15 minutes earlier, or getting from Oshawa or Hamilton to Union 15 minutes earlier? Thanks.

I'm pretty sure that it's 15 minutes off over the entire line. Electrification allows for acceleration when the trains leave the station. This allows them to reach their "cruising speed" much faster resulting in overall shorter travel times.

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Since this is the GO thread I thought I'd ask a question here instead of starting a new one.

Sometime between 2PM and 3PM today, I believe it was 2:50PM, I saw a GO Transit D4500 heading eastbound on Bloor at Runningbrook (East of Tomken and West of Dixie) in service signed up as "Train-Bus, Square One" it was also full of passengers. I'm pretty sure it made a left onto Bloor at Dixie.

Anyways so is this normal routing, or was something wrong with Dundas?

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Since this is the GO thread I thought I'd ask a question here instead of starting a new one.

Sometime between 2PM and 3PM today, I believe it was 2:50PM, I saw a GO Transit D4500 heading eastbound on Bloor at Runningbrook (East of Tomken and West of Dixie) in service signed up as "Train-Bus, Square One" it was also full of passengers. I'm pretty sure it made a left onto Bloor at Dixie.

Anyways so is this normal routing, or was something wrong with Dundas?

I find that GO buses, especially train-buses (which are supposed to be express) have a lot more freedom to divert than regular transit buses. It's not the "normal" routing, but back before they reconfigured Bramalea Station, there were three ways drivers could take to get to Downtown Brampton.

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Since this is the GO thread I thought I'd ask a question here instead of starting a new one.

Sometime between 2PM and 3PM today, I believe it was 2:50PM, I saw a GO Transit D4500 heading eastbound on Bloor at Runningbrook (East of Tomken and West of Dixie) in service signed up as "Train-Bus, Square One" it was also full of passengers. I'm pretty sure it made a left onto Bloor at Dixie.

Anyways so is this normal routing, or was something wrong with Dundas?

The bus was probably doing a Dixie-and-Square One run, bypassing Cooksville which probably got its own bus. During that time of day both Dundas and Hurontario can be packed with traffic. The intersection between the two can be particularly challenging with the pedestrian traffic thrown in as well. I don't know if the bridge on Kirwin Dr. which is used as a bypass around the intersection has been reopened after some construction work. I'm guessing that it followed Bloor to Central Pkwy., then on to Hurontario to resume its route to Square One.

The Mississauga Marathon involved GO buses continuing east on Rathburn to Central Pkwy. the south back to Hurontario to resume the route to Cooksville. My driver apparently got confused and turned west off of Central onto Burnhamthorpe and then south on Cawthra. He then realized he was lost, asked Steeprock for directions to get back to Cooksville. Suffice to say, the bus was late pulling into Union!

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The bus was probably doing a Dixie-and-Square One run, bypassing Cooksville which probably got its own bus. During that time of day both Dundas and Hurontario can be packed with traffic. The intersection between the two can be particularly challenging with the pedestrian traffic thrown in as well. I don't know if the bridge on Kirwin Dr. which is used as a bypass around the intersection has been reopened after some construction work. I'm guessing that it followed Bloor to Central Pkwy., then on to Hurontario to resume its route to Square One.

The Mississauga Marathon involved GO buses continuing east on Rathburn to Central Pkwy. the south back to Hurontario to resume the route to Cooksville. My driver apparently got confused and turned west off of Central onto Burnhamthorpe and then south on Cawthra. He then realized he was lost, asked Steeprock for directions to get back to Cooksville. Suffice to say, the bus was late pulling into Union!

Was anyone ticked off?

I couldn't help but feel for the driver if I was in on board

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Was anyone ticked off?

I couldn't help but feel for the driver if I was in on board

(Noticed a mistake in the routing, it should've been EAST onto Burnhamthorpe instead.) A few people on board were ticked. Those of us sitting in the front rows had heard the instructions and were wondering where the driver was going. By the time he got to Cawthra and Dundas most people had assumed that it was going to just run express all the way to Union by going down Cawthra to the QEW and that a separate bus had been dispatched to service Cooksville (which usually has a lot of people boarding). People only got upset when they found out the driver was lost and had to double back to reach Cooksville.

Onto another discussion, there are always lots of people who board the weekend bus from Square One, yet there are not Ticket Vending Machines at that location. Signs tell people to buy their tickets from the MT terminal across the street but few bother not wanting to miss the bus. What results is that the driver is usually issuing tickets with everyone usually paying with $20 bills making the whole change thing take a lot longer. The TVMs should be able to take bills instead of just change and plastic. There should also be a sign explaining the ticketing structure (single, day-pass, group pass, the usage of monthly passes as 2 for 1 on weekends and holidays - this would really speed up boarding as lots of people travel in pairs but most are oblivious to this money- and time-saving fact) so that people know what to tell the driver. Most just hand their money to the driver without a word. The driver then has to guess where they're going and what kind of ticket they want.

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Onto another discussion, there are always lots of people who board the weekend bus from Square One, yet there are not Ticket Vending Machines at that location. Signs tell people to buy their tickets from the MT terminal across the street but few bother not wanting to miss the bus. What results is that the driver is usually issuing tickets with everyone usually paying with $20 bills making the whole change thing take a lot longer. The TVMs should be able to take bills instead of just change and plastic. There should also be a sign explaining the ticketing structure (single, day-pass, group pass, the usage of monthly passes as 2 for 1 on weekends and holidays - this would really speed up boarding as lots of people travel in pairs but most are oblivious to this money- and time-saving fact) so that people know what to tell the driver. Most just hand their money to the driver without a word. The driver then has to guess where they're going and what kind of ticket they want.

I agree that there should be signs clearly telling passengers to purchase their tickets inside. I bought my ticket on-board once, but only because I didn't realize that I should have instead bought it inside. Of course having taken the GO bus many times before, I told the driver exactly what I needed (and I paid in exace change - imagine that). The point is that if I didn't know to buy my ticket inside, then other people also don't know, and they should have signs.

One of my favourite things about taking the GO bus is how the drivers usually know what to do, where to drive, and how to evade large gluts of traffic. But not always, as in a previous example.

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