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Enviro 500

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23 hours ago, 7749 said:

How is that camera? I'm thinking about getting it maybe.

I'm happy with how it performs, no complaints whatsoever.. It's very flexible for both day and nighttime use. As long as you have good editing software to pair the images with, you're more or less 100% set. Idk what camera you use now so apologies if this is repeat info/something you already know, but the camera is only good for its flexibility and ability to take high resolution images. The raw image is something to -work with- rather than just take and publish, IMO. Sometimes by pure luck the lighting and colors will work out fine to have the raw image come out great, but most of the time it won't work out like that..  I haven't published that many images publicly online (And frankly the ones that i have uploaded to the wiki, I regret uploading since the editing work I did on them is pretty crummy),  but the ones that awstott posted are very good representations of what the camera produces IMO.

If you're into videography I wouldn't recommend it at all.

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Does anyone own or have an experience with the Nikon D5600? I'm not sure if the price point and quality are worth it or if it'd be better to go with something like a D3500. I have been using in the past a Canon Powershot SX530 or my cellphone. I'm no professional and don't want anything crazy. I just want to get a better quality camera with some decent lenses for a trip to Seattle/Vancouver I will be doing in a few months.

Any advice is appreciated.

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 I don't have experience with that particular model, however work has a 5XXX series camera and I find it on the small side.  Mind you I don't exactly have small hands either.  You will notice as you go up in the models the specs get better, as well as the feature set, and lastly the body is larger.  The 5600 is likely a nice capable camera, but I would suggest going somewhere that has a display model to see how it feels in your hands before purchasing.

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Don't get fixated on the different models.  A D3xxx will take just as awesome pictures as a D5xxx.  The D5xxx series have a few more little features built in, but those are things you might not even use or need.  My recommendation is try to spend less on the body and use the extra money for lenses, that's what makes the difference in image quality.  I also agree with the above posts, if it doesn't feel right in your hands, you won't use it, if you don't use it, its a waste of money.  If the D5xxx or D3xxx are too small, look at getting maybe a used D7xxx, they're a bit bigger and, for me at least, feel so much more natural in my hands.

Another reason to look for a used D7xxx is that the D7xxx series has a built in autofocus into the body where as the D3xxx and D5xxx need to have lenses with autofocus built in in order to use the autofocus.

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Does anyone have any experience with the Canon SL3? I've seen reviews of it around and by all accounts it seems to be a good camera and relatively affordable for me, but I don't know personally know anyone in the community who has used it and whether it's the most optimal for bus shooting. Any feedback would be appreciated.

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9 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Does anyone have any experience with the Canon SL3? I've seen reviews of it around and by all accounts it seems to be a good camera and relatively affordable for me, but I don't know personally know anyone in the community who has used it and whether it's the most optimal for bus shooting. Any feedback would be appreciated.

SL3 is a good little camera for beginners, being a SLR it'll come down more to the lenses you put on for shooting buses.  Keep in mind that it has an APS- C sensor and Canon's crop is 1.6, so a 100mm lens will give you a picture if you were using a 160mm lens on a full frame.  So if you're getting close to the buses, you'll have to get a small lens.  The kit lens is the usual 18-55mm which, with the crop factor, acts as a 29-88mm and can be very restrictive for some types of photography.

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3 hours ago, 9924 said:

SL3 is a good little camera for beginners, being a SLR it'll come down more to the lenses you put on for shooting buses.  Keep in mind that it has an APS- C sensor and Canon's crop is 1.6, so a 100mm lens will give you a picture if you were using a 160mm lens on a full frame.  So if you're getting close to the buses, you'll have to get a small lens.  The kit lens is the usual 18-55mm which, with the crop factor, acts as a 29-88mm and can be very restrictive for some types of photography.

My suggestion, keep an open mind, do not focus on one camera!  I've owned a life time worths of cameras and lenses and I strongly urge anyone that isn't a professional photographer to seriously consider buying used equipment, especially for a first camera.

Thanks for your feedback. I've given some thought before to the idea of buying used equipment, but this purchase will not be mine alone - me and my dad have agreed to split the cost of the base camera kit, and he says that he's been burned by buying second hand equipment before - inevitably, it ended up breaking - so I doubt I'd be able to convince him to agree to buy second hand.

Getting up close to the buses might not necessarily be a huge problem. In my experience, If I'm at the point where I have to get right up next to it, I feel like it may be worth foregoing the photo anyway, because at such a close up range, depending on the camera, the distortion can be bothersome. And even if it's not, there's not much value to an in-its-face shot of a bus, in terms of documenting it, IMO. It's a neat visual but if I want to actually document what the bus is then I often have to stand further back, anyway.

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6 hours ago, 9924 said:

 So if you're getting close to the buses, you'll have to get a small lens.  The kit lens is the usual 18-55mm which, with the crop factor, acts as a 29-88mm and can be very restrictive for some types of photography.

While a kit lens at the end of the day is a kit lens, I would disagree that a 18-55mm is restrictive. When it comes to shooting film, I was blown away how much of a pain in the ass (and how jealous I was) of a friend who had a 28mm lens and could get in close and tight, while I was stuck with a 50mm. I usually had to wait for him to take his shots before I could as I was standing halfway across the transit centre. If you get much wider than 24-28mm equivalent,  you start really getting distortion issues, and even a 28mm will have some distortion if you look for it. I've since upgraded (used equipment for the win) to a 16-50mm. The slightly wider angle is nice, but, not really needed. I can still get in as tight as needed in transit centres, LRT station etc. 
My 16-50mm F2.8 on the Sony A77II body covers 90% of my requirements. It's gotten to the point where if I need to zoom more than the lens allows, I'll just use the "smart teleconverter" feature which basically just crops the image sensor. I'm not trying to be some super duper photographer. I'm shooting a bus that may or may not make it onto the internet. Using the smart teleconverter simply means I don't need to crop in post production. Having a constant F2.8 aperture however is VERY important when you have the short days during the winter in particular, but possibly shooting inside a LRT Station unexpectedly for whatever reason. For when I do want to pull out the telephoto lens out, it was able to upgrade from the el cheapo ~70-300mm class of lens by picking up a used G series 70-300mm lens for $500.

The best kit lens I encountered was the Sony 18-70mm which only came out with the first few generations of DSLR bodies. That thing could cover a pretty reasonable range, but, was also an outlier in kit lens. Image quality was about par for the course.

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14 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Does anyone have any experience with the Canon SL3? I've seen reviews of it around and by all accounts it seems to be a good camera and relatively affordable for me, but I don't know personally know anyone in the community who has used it and whether it's the most optimal for bus shooting. Any feedback would be appreciated.

My friend has the Canon SL2, the predecessor from the SL3 and he is very happy with his.  The Canon SL3 has a lot more features than it's predecessor, and as a result I think it'll be a great camera for you, weither that be photography or videography.

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10 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Thanks for your feedback. I've given some thought before to the idea of buying used equipment, but this purchase will not be mine alone - me and my dad have agreed to split the cost of the base camera kit, and he says that he's been burned by buying second hand equipment before - inevitably, it ended up breaking - so I doubt I'd be able to convince him to agree to buy second hand.

Fair enough, I can totally understand the caution with pre-owned equipment but, especially with camera's, it's become a very reliable market with a lot of pro's always upgrading to the newest equipment.  I haven't shot Canon in about 15 years, so honestly, I can't even say what lenses are compatible or not, but if they work on the SL3, see if you can pick up some vintage fixed focal manual focus lenses for it.  They are dirt cheap (being manual focus) but the images you get from them are amazing.

6 hours ago, M. Parsons said:

While a kit lens at the end of the day is a kit lens, I would disagree that a 18-55mm is restrictive. When it comes to shooting film, I was blown away how much of a pain in the ass (and how jealous I was) of a friend who had a 28mm lens and could get in close and tight, while I was stuck with a 50mm. I usually had to wait for him to take his shots before I could as I was standing halfway across the transit centre. If you get much wider than 24-28mm equivalent,  you start really getting distortion issues, and even a 28mm will have some distortion if you look for it. I've since upgraded (used equipment for the win) to a 16-50mm. The slightly wider angle is nice, but, not really needed. I can still get in as tight as needed in transit centres, LRT station etc. 
My 16-50mm F2.8 on the Sony A77II body covers 90% of my requirements. It's gotten to the point where if I need to zoom more than the lens allows, I'll just use the "smart teleconverter" feature which basically just crops the image sensor. I'm not trying to be some super duper photographer. I'm shooting a bus that may or may not make it onto the internet. Using the smart teleconverter simply means I don't need to crop in post production. Having a constant F2.8 aperture however is VERY important when you have the short days during the winter in particular, but possibly shooting inside a LRT Station unexpectedly for whatever reason. For when I do want to pull out the telephoto lens out, it was able to upgrade from the el cheapo ~70-300mm class of lens by picking up a used G series 70-300mm lens for $500.

The best kit lens I encountered was the Sony 18-70mm which only came out with the first few generations of DSLR bodies. That thing could cover a pretty reasonable range, but, was also an outlier in kit lens. Image quality was about par for the course.

Yeah, I'm gonna stay with my opinion on the 18-55 kit lens.  There's a reason why most photographers pretty much toss it into the back of the bag, it just provides very consistent flat and bland images.  When I went to Nikon, the first lens I bought was a 35mm f1.8 and even though the focal length is covered in the 18-55 kit lens, the 35 blows it out of the water in every way.  The same goes for my 10-20mm f4.0 and 50mm f1.8.  Honestly, I can't even remember the last time I used the 18-55, not sure I even have it anymore 😆

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On May 12, 2020 at 5:16 AM, 9924 said:

Fair enough, I can totally understand the caution with pre-owned equipment but, especially with camera's, it's become a very reliable market with a lot of pro's always upgrading to the newest equipment.  I haven't shot Canon in about 15 years, so honestly, I can't even say what lenses are compatible or not, but if they work on the SL3, see if you can pick up some vintage fixed focal manual focus lenses for it.  They are dirt cheap (being manual focus) but the images you get from them are amazing.

Yeah, I'm gonna stay with my opinion on the 18-55 kit lens.  There's a reason why most photographers pretty much toss it into the back of the bag, it just provides very consistent flat and bland images.  When I went to Nikon, the first lens I bought was a 35mm f1.8 and even though the focal length is covered in the 18-55 kit lens, the 35 blows it out of the water in every way.  The same goes for my 10-20mm f4.0 and 50mm f1.8.  Honestly, I can't even remember the last time I used the 18-55, not sure I even have it anymore 😆

All very good points.  I can definitely understand his father's reluctance to buy used equipment if he's gotten burned in the past.  Camera stores typically do two different approaches to used equipment.  Some of them actually buy used equipment and resell it with a warranty after going through it, quite often as people trade in for newer equipment, and that's usually a pretty safe way to buy used gear since if it acts up in the warranty period, the store will either fix/replace/refund it.  Others sell used equipment on consignment and that's the more risky of the two.  Basically in a consignment sale, all the store is doing is acting as a venue for someone selling their gear privately.  All they do is provide display case space to show it off and ring up the sale and handle the financial transaction for a cut of the selling price so it's pretty much the same as buying privately from a classified ad on Kijiji with no warranty or recourse if something goes bad, so I'd be reluctant to pay top dollar for YMMV used equipment being sold on a consignment basis.  That said, all my cameras have been used.  I had one replaced under a store warranty when the meter in one quit working within about two weeks and ended up exchanging a total lemon of a lens that had problems with the iris blades jamming.

Kit lenses are definitely built to a price, that's for sure, and it usually shows so fixed focal length lenses are definitely the way to go except for the occasional zoom that's an excellent performer.  Every manufacturer seems to do it occasionally where they turn out a zoom lens that has performance that hits it out of the park as if it's a fixed length prime lens and it's definitely worth picking those up when you can, but otherwise I'd stay away from zooms and stick with primes since zoom lenses usually involve sacrifices towards image quality to enable functionality while keeping the price from ballooning.

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I reported at some point that I used an Galaxy S7 Edge. I now use an S9+ and a Nikon d3400.

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I currently use my iPhone XR and a Canon EOS Rebel T100. My lenses for it are 18-55mm and 75-300mm.

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So a few days ago, I went ahead and bought the Canon SL3.

I really like it so far. It checks off a lot of boxes for what I was looking for in a camera, particularly when it comes to the quality of night photos which were a big weak link in my collection so far. The focus will take a bit of working out since it behaves so differently (especially the manual focus) from what I'm used to, but once I get used to it, I'll be off and away. Grabbed a 55-250 mm telephoto lens for it yesterday too.

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