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COVID-19 (Coronavirus) - How are you coping with this?

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So, lemme get this straight.

Ontario “frontline” workers get congratulated and a 4$ an hour raise, and the TTC employees volunteering to drive and maintain the covid patient transport buses- nevermind the others putting in a normal day’s work with the general public, get mass lay-off notices.
 
🤨

 

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For some reason, the caution tape surrounding the exterior of the local playground structure broke.  So what do the kids do?  Well of course, continually break off more pieces of the tape and start playing with it like a kite!

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I am contemplating the significance of being and “essential” worker but not a “front line” worker after talking about the difference with one of the guys I work with.

So far, from what I’ve been able to tell, it means I’m required to keep going to work but without being eligible for any of the perks or benefits being given to the “front line” workers or ANY support from our work from home management.

The guy I was talking to was asking if we can still call in sick.  We’re all getting burned out and we’re feeling it and there’s been no help from any corner, be it the employer side, government side, public side.

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Some cautiously optimistic news, suggesting that immunity, even if not permanent, might not be as distant of a hope as some doom-and-gloomers on the internet have been suggesting:

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=https://www.n-tv.de/wissen/Drosten-Genesene-Corona-Patienten-immun-article21746354.html&prev=search

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/south-korean-studies-suggest-antibodies-protect-covid-19/story?id=70312111

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4 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Some cautiously optimistic news, suggesting that immunity, even if not permanent, might not be as distant of a hope as some doom-and-gloomers on the internet have been suggesting:

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=https://www.n-tv.de/wissen/Drosten-Genesene-Corona-Patienten-immun-article21746354.html&prev=search

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/south-korean-studies-suggest-antibodies-protect-covid-19/story?id=70312111

Even if immunity isn't permanent like the way it is with chicken pox where you get it, you suffer through it, and most people never have to worry about it again, it just needs to last for a while to get the worst of the peak behind.  Even a relatively short 90 day or 120 day immunity period in the people who've recovered would go a long way to getting the existing situation under far better control.

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On 4/25/2020 at 3:17 PM, Bus_Medic said:

So, lemme get this straight.

Ontario “frontline” workers get congratulated and a 4$ an hour raise, and the TTC employees volunteering to drive and maintain the covid patient transport buses- nevermind the others putting in a normal day’s work with the general public, get mass lay-off notices.
 
🤨

 

Yup, and being public sector, the CEWS program doesn't apply to them.  

 

But hey, "we're all in this together!" 🙄

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One thing that's really troubling is this: if the fatality rate is as low as it's claimed to be (around 3% or less), why is it that on average, 1 person dies for every 5 that recover (as of right now there are 274K deaths and 1.31M recoveries worldwide) - doesn't that mean the fatality rate is actually about 20%?? Although Canada's rate of death vs recovery is somewhat below the global average, it's still high enough for me to be worried about my family's well-being if any of us do end up getting it. I really hope an effective antiviral treatment becomes available soon, so the situation gets under control before a vaccine is approved (presumably) next year.

covid.JPG

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11 minutes ago, 81-717 said:

One thing that's really troubling is this: if the fatality rate is as low as it's claimed to be (around 3% or less), why is it that on average, 1 person dies for every 5 that recover (as of right now there are 274K deaths and 1.31M recoveries worldwide) - doesn't that mean the fatality rate is actually about 20%?? Although Canada's rate of death vs recovery is somewhat below the global average, it's still high enough for me to be worried about my family's well-being if any of us do end up getting it. I really hope an effective antiviral treatment becomes available soon, so the situation gets under control before a vaccine is approved (presumably) next year.

 

You are assuming that every person who has contracted the virus is being caught, which is nowhere close to being the case. That's why you have to be so careful about the doomers who act like the sky is falling every time there is an increase in reported cases - expanding our testing capabilities enables us to find people who are either asymptomatic or have such mild symptoms that they don't seek out medical help, so the data is skewed, in many places, toward the critical cases. A much more helpful metric for how this crisis is going is the hospitalization and death rate - if 8000 people test positive, but all of them kick the virus without a doctor so much as lifting a finger, it is much less concerning than 800 people being hospitalized.

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2020/04/26/are-the-silent-spreaders-driving-covid-19-mounting-evidence-points-to-asymptomatic-cases.html

Here in Ontario we are still not testing asymptomatic people, so it should come as no surprise that the death rate seems much higher than it actually is.

"PHO is not currently recommending routine testing of asymptomatic persons for COVID-19 outside of those recommended in Ministry guidance, or as directed by the public health unit for public health investigation. Please note that given an incubation period of up to 14 days for COVID-19 disease after exposure, a negative PCR test result in an asymptomatic person should not be used to rule out disease."

https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/laboratory-services/test-information-index/wuhan-novel-coronavirus

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.14.20062463v2

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2 hours ago, 81-717 said:

One thing that's really troubling is this: if the fatality rate is as low as it's claimed to be (around 3% or less), why is it that on average, 1 person dies for every 5 that recover (as of right now there are 274K deaths and 1.31M recoveries worldwide) - doesn't that mean the fatality rate is actually about 20%?? Although Canada's rate of death vs recovery is somewhat below the global average, it's still high enough for me to be worried about my family's well-being if any of us do end up getting it. 

covid.JPG

Who knows how the "recovered" is documented. Is that being certified by a doctor? What if someone is simply isolated at home, symptoms are gone, waiting period is done and nothing formerly gets reported? How does Canada record recoveries vs. China vs. the US etc? I think you're looking to closely at the recovered vs. deaths and probably taking it out of context... Given that there are 3.93M known cases. God only knows how many cases are unknown.

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There is a very large number of cases "unknown", it's statistically logical.  Factoring in that, the death rate is lower than reported.  Also, keep in mind, mortality from the virus (and severe cases) also have a lot to do with the demographics (age, health, common illnesses) that are prevalent in one country and not another country.

Statistics are a wonderful thing, but there's always a deeper story behind the numbers.

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On May 9, 2020 at 11:06 PM, MVTArider said:

With so many news anchors and reporters working from home, I was waiting the whole month for the April news bloopers to be released. Worth the wait IMO :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrDDCY7AzgA

 

Ha!  That was a good laugh.  Bonus points at 1:55 for the famous Gerbil Box Dejero Box, a fine local Kitchener-Waterloo product.

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I had an incident yesterday that prompted a new line of thought about the secondary effects of the pandemic.

I got a phone call from someone at one of the branch plants asking for help with a piece of equipment.  I didn't have a chance to ask how their maintenance and engineering technologist was doing because the person I was speaking with said, "I've only seen Don do this once before and even he was struggling with it and now that he's retired..."  Ok, that explains why I got the call, but I had no idea the guy retired.  Apparently, he was working from home as much as possible but decided to retire since he was 68 years old and thinking about it anyways and he decided he didn't want to run the risk of exposure if management were to compel him to go into the plant.

So here's the question:  What happens with the workforce if many people at or near retirement age decide to pack it in rather than risk going back into the workplace?  The silver lining is that it in theory creates some opportunities for younger people if boomers that simply would not retire finally start moving on, but at the same time, having expertise and institutional knowledge walk out the door in an organized and chaotic manner is not good either because it gets lost if it isn't passed on which creates its own set of problems.

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Taken to the extreme, it could cause significant cash flow imbalances with many workplace pension plans....even the government one.

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As a retail worker, one thing about these restrictions that I wouldn't mind sticking around forever, though I know it's unrealistic to expect it to, is the capacity limits on stores.

My store reopened to the public a few weeks ago. At first, it was relatively calm, but lately it's turned into a total zoo, even with a capacity limit on people. Fair play if you've lost your fear of the virus, but a] not everyone has, and b] customers who crowd around one spot and are all shouting in one voice asking questions the newbie is not qualified to answer in any way continue to be the worst, virus or no virus. It feels like it's so much worse than it was during regular times, though admittedly my old job was at a much smaller store so I might be lying to myself. I can't imagine how bad it would be if everyone and their dog got to go into the store all at once.

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I have a question though. If this 5 person limit gets upped to 10, can we technically have our friends and family over inside our homes? Can I go for a bike ride with my friend? 

I feel like the answer is obvious, but I want get another opinion because my way of thinking will likely be biased towards more interaction. 

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