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ultimately this city will have to decide between moving cars or moving people - leaving things as is, or a congestion charge. The rise of Uber and delivery services are increasing auto usage where otherwise it might fall, and they must be made to pay an economic cost for the impacts that activity has. On the other hand we need to see continual innovation from TTC Planning with changes and additions to routes to reflect where new residences and businesses are appearing.

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I get the distinct impression this Carbone fellow is a bellicose, habitual shit disturbing crackpot. Yet another common bond with Mr. Mammoliti. Birds of a feather.....

Stay classy, San Diego.

I feel like they should rework all of it, and I agree on coming in clockwise rather than CCW.  I was thinking, if they could make it CCW, they could probably add a mini "siding" (see red marking bel

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1 hour ago, dowlingm said:

ultimately this city will have to decide between moving cars or moving people

There is no feasible way to better move cars downtown. The physical space to do this is about maxed out. It's too busy for traffic to move more quickly, and anyway with the amount of pedestrian activity and residential population it can't be safely done. (I don't expect self-driving cars to manage any of the amazing feats that the fanboys expect, certainly not in the central city.) That whole approach went away when the Crosstown, Spadina, Richview, etc. urban freeways were cancelled.

The interesting thing is that driving a car is actually not that bad within Toronto, because of the dense grid network and the TTC drawing off people who would otherwise drive. Go out to Mississauga and check out Dixie Road northbound, beside the airport, around 5 PM on a weekday if you want to see really bad traffic congestion.

So really the city has had its decision made for it. Now it just needs to penetrate the brains of City Council.

 

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59 minutes ago, Ed T. said:

There is no feasible way to better move cars downtown. The physical space to do this is about maxed out. It's too busy for traffic to move more quickly, and anyway with the amount of pedestrian activity and residential population it can't be safely done. (I don't expect self-driving cars to manage any of the amazing feats that the fanboys expect, certainly not in the central city.) That whole approach went away when the Crosstown, Spadina, Richview, etc. urban freeways were cancelled.

The interesting thing is that driving a car is actually not that bad within Toronto, because of the dense grid network and the TTC drawing off people who would otherwise drive. Go out to Mississauga and check out Dixie Road northbound, beside the airport, around 5 PM on a weekday if you want to see really bad traffic congestion.

So really the city has had its decision made for it. Now it just needs to penetrate the brains of City Council.

 

Quite frankly, I've never understood why anyone would want to drive in downtown Toronto, especially when there are much better alternatives (the Yonge, University, Spadina, Bloor, Danforth subways, the 501, 504, 505, 506, 509, 510, 511, and 512 streetcars, cycling, or even walking) considering the streetcars that cause so much slowing of traffic (Oh the horror!~), the moronic pedestrians that walk in front of vehicles, and those dang cyclists that speed past you (how dare they go faster than me!). Suburbanites that choose to do this on a daily basis are really really funny people; the hypocrisy baffles me and honestly, I'm waiting for the day that they ban all left turns along streetcar corridors, only to have suburbanites still chose to drive downtown. 

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50 minutes ago, Streety McCarface said:

Quite frankly, I've never understood why anyone would want to drive in downtown Toronto, especially when there are much better alternatives (the Yonge, University, Spadina, Bloor, Danforth subways, the 501, 504, 505, 506, 509, 510, 511, and 512 streetcars, cycling, or even walking) considering the streetcars that cause so much slowing of traffic (Oh the horror!~), the moronic pedestrians that walk in front of vehicles, and those dang cyclists that speed past you (how dare they go faster than me!). Suburbanites that choose to do this on a daily basis are really really funny people; the hypocrisy baffles me and honestly, I'm waiting for the day that they ban all left turns along streetcar corridors, only to have suburbanites still chose to drive downtown. 

Thing about drivers - individually they all have their own rationalisations but rarely recognise that others might have them too. "I have to drive because people on the subway are gross/I have to stand on the streetcar - oh God why is the car park full again today, don't people have any other way to get around"

That said, we, through those we elect, choose to do "just enough" in transit infrastructure and "value engineer" comfort out of it. I was at Kennedy just this morning: observing the buses pulling into the exposed stops, the grim greyness and coldness of the SRT platform; and now the TYSSE stations built with half million dollar public art which won't be used by the public because rude words but no provision of platform doors or public washrooms at all stations. We do a KSP where stops are moved near onset of winter but no effort to provide temporary shelters.

Oh - here's another. Crosstown stops which have bus shelters on separate side platforms rather than shared, more fully enclosed platforms with heated flooring.

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19 minutes ago, nfitz said:

Discounted parking?

 

Doesn't seem to be any shortage of people when I walk around. At least now it's warmer.

Once it warms up even more, there'll be way more people milling about. Its not like King Street was some super busy attraction mid-December in the cold anyway. People won't want to be in -10 a minute longer than they have to. Additionally, the Distillery District is all the rage around that time anyways, so I don't know what they're expecting. 

I also think that what business owners lost in the winter can mostly, if not completely be regained in the summer time, when they have extra space for their own restaurants, cafes etc., but also because of the public attractions that will be there too. There is plenty of on-street parking on other streets, you just have to look for it, and there are many parking lots in that area. Another point of the KSP is to promote/encourage more walking/exploring along that stretch, since its filled with all sorts of attractions, from arts to furniture as well as food. 

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Latest reports are showing a boost of 25% in ridership on King as a result of the Pilot, and a bump from around 65k pax to 72k pax daily. 

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/01/11/king-st-pilot-boosting-streetcar-ridership-ttc.html

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https://globalnews.ca/news/3962837/kit-kat-bar-king-street-pilot-project-toronto/

The city has added 90 new free parking spaces near the busy stretches of King along the KSP in order to boost business somewhat. 

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Read that too this morning; agree on the parts where the Pilot should be introduced in the Spring, rather than the winter and also to have the decorations/attractions previously in place before launching. I'm surprised they didn't think of this earlier. Or perhaps it was just a general urgency to get the KSP up and running....

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Tried the downtown King St pilot project today on board Flexity 4433 on 504 run #19 departing Dundas West station @ 14:20 and arriving at Broadview station exactly one hour later @ 15:20. (Oddly, the car ahead of us on run #18 was 4444.) It took us about 7 minutes to get from Bathurst to Jarvis - don't know how long it would have taken before the no through traffic rule came into effect - probably twice as long? I will post a video and other media soon, but from the journey I have observed frequent cases of riders being unaware that their stop had moved to the far corner, both on board and on the sidewalks. Fortunately there weren't any drivers going straight where prohibited. I also noticed the efficiency of the bike bumps on Roncesvalles - very efficiently designed to work with the Flexity cars. If only they could make true level boarding possible so that even wheelchair ramps wouldn't be needed - just bridge plates, speeding up boarding times!

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/king-pilot-attack-campaign-1.4498917

Regarding the middle finger sculpture, I don't know how others feel about it, but personally I think it is a foolish thing to do. When we have visitors from other cities, or even abroad, is this really the appropriate thing to do, stick a middle finger at them? Its stupidity, and I'm not even mentioning the thousands of commuters who see it every day. 

I feel that alot of this exaggeration, especially considering that it is the winter, and it has been an especially cold and snowy one at that, at least so far. You can't expect people to be bustling around all day. Additionally, at this time of year, the Distillery District is more of an intriguing attraction. I think that in the future, they should introduce any pilots (if applicable) in the spring or the summer, to see the full benefits of the extra space, which incidentally was being demonstrated today, with a game of hockey:

http://www.bttoronto.ca/2018/01/31/puck-protest-business-owners-play-hockey-on-king-street/

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14 minutes ago, Bus_Medic said:

I get the distinct impression this Carbone fellow is a bellicose, habitual shit disturbing crackpot. Yet another common bond with Mr. Mammoliti.

Birds of a feather.....

I've heard from my co-workers downtown that his restaurant is overpriced as well...perhaps another put-off. 

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https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/transportation/2018/02/16/spending-on-king-st-up-since-streetcar-pilot-began.html

First off, weekday ridership was found to be close to 84000, a significant increase over the weekday ridership of 65000 before the KSP was introduced. 

Spending in the area of the KSP between October and December increased 21%, which is a trend that has been matched in previous years. The relevant spending statistics were found using sale data from credit and debit card processor Moneris Solutions. However, many business owners continue to complain.

I mean, I don't see myself going to a restaurant with a middle finger being pointed at me. 

A combined 57% of people who took the poll in this article agree that its not the right way of going about it. 

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Reading about the RapidTO lanes being installed on Eglinton got me thinking about improvements to the King St. Transit Priority Corridor.  The red paint should really be used on the segments where private vehicles are not allowed to continue through an intersection.  With the shift in the corridor to far-side stops a streetcar will go through the intersection and then stop.  A private vehicle, oblivious to the signage at the intersection, will tail the streetcar through and then get stuck behind it when the streetcar serves the stop.  More often than not the vehicle then winds up blocking traffic and/or pedestrians on the cross-street waiting for the streetcar to proceed.

According to the article:

Quote

The design is based on provincial and national standards, and doesn’t currently include physical barriers to separate the bus lanes and regular traffic. That means it will be up to car drivers to pay attention and obey the rules. The penalty for improperly driving in a bus lane is a $110 fine and three demerit points.

Could cameras be installed at some key intersections to catch them?  Similar to the red light cameras.  Making intersections like Yonge a do-not-block the intersection would probably incur more fines for the driver.  For the most part the driver is stationary waiting for the streetcar to leave the stop, which should make documenting the infraction a lot easier and a potential cash cow for the City.  Would the King St. corridor need to be designated a "bus lane" first though? 

The yellow paint is already faded, bright red would definitely stand out more.  Short of putting in retractable bollards as other agencies have done, I don't know what else can be done to deter people from driving in the corridor.

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