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Swadian

Lengthen H3-45 with 4th axle?

9 posts in this topic

How long can Prevost extend the H3-45 while keeping it rigid if they were to add a 4th axle? Is something like a production H4-51 possible?

Note: This is only asking whether it is possible, not whether it is likely.

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2 hours ago, Swadian said:

How long can Prevost extend the H3-45 while keeping it rigid if they were to add a 4th axle? Is something like a production H4-51 possible?

Note: This is only asking whether it is possible, not whether it is likely.

Well they did pump out the H5-60 which did have 4 axles. 2 steers, 2 mid ship and 1 for the trailer that steered. If you are talking as in one long body then no, it wouldn't quite be possible. Navigating in city is hard as it is for a 45 foot bus. And if you added another axle you would extend the wheelbase, that cuts the turning radius as well.

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No, the H5-60 had 5 axles and was articulated. I'm talking about a 4-axle rigid. 53' trailers are standard for trucks, though trailers can afford much longer overhangs, so a motorcoach probably couldn't go longer than 50'.

15-meter (about 49.2 feet) rigid coaches are allowed in the UK and Japan, amongst other countries. An example is the Neoplan Megaliner used by JR.

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Question?

 

Are the 50'/51' foot coaches even "legal" in North America? I know you see them all the time in Europe but what about NA?

 

I've seen 30', 35', 40', 45', and 60' coaches but never a 50'/51'? I know they have two axles in the front & 2 axles in the back?

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Someone I know has ridden them from Mexico to Panama, which is technically NA.

Even if they are not legal in US/Canada, legislation could be passed to allow them, since they are clearly allowed in many countries around the world, including many with worse roads and tighter road corners than US/Canada.

A H4-5X could be powered by a Volvo D15 or up-rated D13 and carry 64 passengers in standard configuration, or up to 68 passengers in high-density.

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8 hours ago, Swadian said:

No, the H5-60 had 5 axles and was articulated. I'm talking about a 4-axle rigid. 53' trailers are standard for trucks, though trailers can afford much longer overhangs, so a motorcoach probably couldn't go longer than 50'.

15-meter (about 49.2 feet) rigid coaches are allowed in the UK and Japan, amongst other countries. An example is the Neoplan Megaliner used by JR.

My bad. Was just trying to remember off the top of my head on that one. misread my response.

6 hours ago, Swadian said:

Someone I know has ridden them from Mexico to Panama, which is technically NA.

Even if they are not legal in US/Canada, legislation could be passed to allow them, since they are clearly allowed in many countries around the world, including many with worse roads and tighter road corners than US/Canada.

A H4-5X could be powered by a Volvo D15 or up-rated D13 and carry 64 passengers in standard configuration, or up to 68 passengers in high-density.

It's all up to Transport Canada and the province whether they would allow it or not on the roads. I imagine they would ask where it would operate and look at if the streets are even able to handle it.

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What about the US? Can a H4-5X be deployed in the US? If it's possible, then we're just waiting on legislation. Usually, vehicles in the US and Canada are similar.

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For length in most NA instances 45' is pushing it. There are several spots that are very tight to begin with. Seen more damage on the rear of a 45' than i had on a rear of a 40'. 

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