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On June 25, 2020 at 7:48 PM, Charlie said:

Hi all,

I was wondering if anybody could help me find out any information on this locomotive, seen in the Walkley Yard, Ottawa, June 1991. 

91JUNE1.thumb.jpg.13f5d190cb366bfbb3349311de98acfb.jpg

I have been trying to find some info online, but to no avail.

Photo is my own. 

Took some work Googling but it would appear this was originally CN MLW S-4 #8018, later to Canada Starch. Paint matches the pic in the source link below, as does the time frame that it was listed as retired by Canada Starch. They did list the Hull, Chelsea & Wakefield as "stillborn" which certainly wasn't quite the case.  

http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/industrial/ont/casco.htm

 

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10 hours ago, M. Parsons said:

Took some work Googling but it would appear this was originally CN MLW S-4 #8018, later to Canada Starch. Paint matches the pic in the source link below, as does the time frame that it was listed as retired by Canada Starch. They did list the Hull, Chelsea & Wakefield as "stillborn" which certainly wasn't quite the case.  

http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/industrial/ont/casco.htm

 

Very interesting! I wonder if for whatever reason they had difficulties with the locomotive itself, or running the locomotive along the line so they decided to go with the Swedish locos instead.

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On 7/11/2020 at 9:41 PM, thager said:

Does anyone know what CN is using this for, the box car in the middle have a compressor or generator running and a couple workers on it, there are hoses going from the tanks to the box car. 

20200711_195503.jpg

20200711_195509.jpg

That's CN's herbicide train. It sprays weeds along the right of way.

 

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3 hours ago, Shaun said:

So with the Rocky Mountaineer being cancelled for the season, will they be taking this time to refurbishing their fleet? Any possible damage by having the fleet parked for over a year? 

Some of their cars were repainted a few years ago in Toronto at VIA's TMC.

 

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8 hours ago, Viafreak said:

Some of their cars were repainted a few years ago in Toronto at VIA's TMC.

The most recent repainting and refurbishing a couple of years ago was done by ONR. That finally wrapped up last year.

 

The repainting done at the former CRCR - which is located at VIA's TMC, and was only done on a small portion of the fleet - was over 10 years ago.

 

Dan

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1182402789_ONR1800.thumb.jpg.be277cadb04969d79f698b9035e54baf.jpg

I thought I'd cross-post this from one of the general forums since it might be of interest.  I found a bunch of film I shot years ago but never developed.  I'm working my way through the backlog which apparently on the roll of film I developed tonight goes back as far as the Northlander still running.  Ontario Northland 1800 at the front of the train just outside of Bracebridge.

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Many public transit systems have 3rd party bus trackers (such as transsee.ca) that can tell you approximately live position of the bus. 

Is there anything similar for Canadian Pacific/National trains? Where you can track nearby trains or trains on the subdivision at a specific time?

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Seconding the above question. I'm also wondering if there's any schedules for trains out there or anything like that. I'd like to get into railfanning but I have no idea where to even start.

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2 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Seconding the above question. I'm also wondering if there's any schedules for trains out there or anything like that. I'd like to get into railfanning but I have no idea where to even start.

CN and CP both got into the whole "precision scheduled railroading" thing with Hunter Harrison so there would be freight timetables for operational purposes for that but I have no idea where to go looking for that sort of thing out in the open.

I've never gone out deliberately to take mainline railway pictures because absent a schedule to work from it's a bit too much like fishing for my taste.  Eventually something might come along in a direction that's got favourable lighting on it or maybe not but waiting around all day just in case would drive m up the wall.  If I happen along a train line and a train comes along while I'm out, I'll watch it go by and try to get a picture.  That ONR picture up above is an example.  I was walking around Bracebridge with a friend and all of a sudden we heard the train approaching and we barely had enough time to get our cameras out and ready to take pictures.

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CN and CP freight trains are absolutely scheduled, yes. And in some cases, the schedules can remain remarkably static and consistent over the course of years, and even decades.

 

If you are trackside in the same spot at the same time over the course of several weeks, you will likely see the "same" train show up at more-or-less the same time. Their schedules can vary - some are 7 days a week, some are weekdays only, some are only 2 or 3 days per week - but they generally are pretty consistent. Obviously the further away from the train's origin you are, the more variable that the time you will see it will be.

 

As for something like Transee, with some sort of graphical overview of the lines......that's a lot more tricky. There are a number of different ways for the railways to operate and activate their signal systems, but only one - Automated Train Control System, or ATCS - allows for the ability for outsiders to interpret and decode the signals as it is broadcast using cell-spectrum signals over-the-air, versus copper or fibre optic cables for most of the other systems. And on top of that, ATCS is not exactly state-of-the-art anymore, and has already been replaced in a number of locations with fibre installations.

 

There are a couple of ATCS groups out there - the Groups.io one is probably the best one for getting started - if you want to find out more about it.

 

Dan

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Now for some real pointers..

A few pointers from your friendly neighborhood locomotive engineer

Let's start with some DON'Ts.

1) A train is really, really big. Can we all accept that? Not even your Ram/F350/Hummer/douche-mobile is a match for a locomotive. You say you have a Cummins diesel? Caterpillar? Detroit? Oooooooh. Well I have an EMD 567 on a bad day, and even its pathetic eighteen-hundred horsepower will pound you and your gleaming pickup into the fourth dimension, so please, stay behind the white line!

2) I hate blocking crossings. Seriously, I feel like a complete asshole when I stop a train in the middle of the road and leave two dozen motorists to ponder their lattes and ask what the hell I'm doing. The truth is, sometimes it has to be done, so don't honk at me, flip me off, or scream at me from the window of your Dodge Caravan as you're shooting a U. Instead, be patient and try to believe that there's a point to what I'm doing. It's called switching, and my conductor is depending on me to work slowly and not run his ass over. If you don't believe me, Wiki that shit.

3) Don't climb on the equipment. I hate to sound like your mother, but you're saving me a lot of paperwork and horrifying flashbacks by staying off the equipment. To you it might look like an abandoned train or a free ride, but when that bastard starts to move with you on it, there's a damn good chance you won't be able to hold on. As long as you're on Wikipedia, punch in "slack action" and see what comes up. Also, the romance of riding freight trains is total bullshit. They're really dark, really cold, really windy, and hobos are fucking SCARY.

4) Don't put shit on the tracks. It's dangerous to me and my conductor, and it's ten times more dangerous for you and everyone else on the ground. If you're wondering "can a train go over a rock?" the answer is YES. There's only one problem. You probably haven't wondered where the million shards of rock are going to go at four times the speed of sound, have you?

5) Stop whining about the horn. Countless accidents have been avoided because drivers missed the flashing lights but heard the horn. You'd have to blast Miley Cyrus and Lil' Bow Wow pretty fucking loud to drown out a five-chime, and often that's the only thing that saves people. Still, that's no reason to keep your stereo at eighty decibels as you're rolling through a crossing at sixty without looking both ways.

6) By and large, railroad cops are major douche bags, so when you're trespassing on railroad property, keep your head out of your ass. These guys didn't make it into the real police force, and they will ream your ass inside and out to make up for it. Also, walking on bridges and in tunnels is extremely dangerous. Ask yourself: If a train comes, where will I go? Trains are much wider than the rails they run on, so don't be fooled.

Now for some of the DO'S.

1) If you see a large object (like a garbage can or an F350) that's about to get love-tapped by a hotshot freight train, get in the clear. If the shit's about to fly at a railroad crossing, run to the side of the street that the train is coming from. That way you'll be behind the point of impact and you won't have to worry about catching that beautiful pickup and its over-confident driver square on your fucking shoulders. If you run away from the train you're just putting yourself in the line of fire, and the death toll could very possibly be two.

2) If the gates stay down and the lights stay flashing, stay where you are. I guaran-damn-tee there's another train coming, and speeding onto the tracks the moment the first train clears is a lot like celebrating a touchdown too early. WHAM.

3) When you're waiting for a train to pass, it's a good idea to stay back thirty or forty feet. Trains are operated by professionals, but often they're loaded by total assclowns. I've heard some real nasty stories about payloads falling off flatcars and crushing people in their vehicles, or doors sliding off boxcars and ripping through everything in their path. It's rare, but shit happens!

4) Always report problems or suspicious activity. If you see a photographer with a radio scanner and a big-ass notebook, ignore him. We know that guy. But if there's a dude in street clothes working a crowbar through a signal box, hit us up and tell us what the deal is. Railroad crossings usually have signs with emergency numbers, or you can call the non-emergency number for your local fuzz. If an accident has already occurred or a life is at risk, call 911 instead. Pretty sure they have our number.

5) Last but not least, when you're inconvenienced by a train, remember that we're pulling for you! Trains are a great way to conserve fuel, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and keep American jobs alive and green. Rail technology is the best solution to our energy crisis, and as the rail network grows in the years to come, it's important for everyone to stay safe. Look, listen, LIVE.

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