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2015 Community Shuttle Order

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Upon looking at Translink's Open Bids page, I stumbled upon a request for proposal for the design, production and supply of Community Shuttle Vehicles.

Here is the RFP that is attached to the document.

Some general requirements:

  • Max. Length/Width/Height: 30ft/96in/120in
  • Capacity: 24 passengers seated, 20 when mobility equipment is in use. Max 24
  • Seat fabric: As usual, the Freestyle WV-205 Wave that is seen on almost every 2009+ model vehicle
  • Quantity: 24, with at least an additional 40
  • Fuel: Either Gasoline or Diesel
  • Chassis is that of either a van or truck

Any thoughts or corrections?

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While flipping through, I'm surprised how in the Appendix sections, instructions for the Compass Card reader installation was not included, compared to the RFP for articulated buses a few months back.

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I wonder if they are replacing the remaining 2007 ElDorado National Aero Elite which is around 19 and the for West Vancouver Blue Bus to re-design their bus network with the conversion of 254 to Community Shuttle and to get the 254 and 256 two way community shuttle service.

By the way, when are they schedule to be delivered?

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I wonder if they are replacing the remaining 2007 ElDorado National Aero Elite which is around 19 and the for West Vancouver Blue Bus to re-design their bus network with the conversion of 254 to Community Shuttle and to get the 254 and 256 two way community shuttle service.

By the way, when are they schedule to be delivered?

Well they are almost done their life, I mean it has been almost 6 years since the 2009 shuttles (S357-S380) have entered service. Also, according to page 99, Im thinking it is around early next year (Jan-Feb)

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Upon looking at Translink's Open Bids page, I stumbled upon a request for proposal for the design, production and supply of Community Shuttle Vehicles.

Here is the RFP that is attached to the document.

Some general requirements:

  • Max. Length/Width/Height: 30ft/96in/120in
  • Capacity: 24 passengers seated, 20 when mobility equipment is in use. Max 24
  • Seat fabric: As usual, the Freestyle WV-205 Wave that is seen on almost every 2009+ model vehicle
  • Quantity: 24, with at least an additional 40
  • Fuel: Either Gasoline or Diesel
  • Chassis is that of either a van or truck

Any thoughts or corrections?

Any chance they want a real bus, such as MiDi or Vicinity?

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Bids have come from

-Kirkman Bus Sales
-Grande West Transportation
-Overland Custom Coach Inc.
-Dynamic Specialty Vehicles Ltd.
-Western Canada Bus

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Ford is a good chassis, but Translink is going to need to use Propane or install a bigger tank, as the tank in that chassis is too small (40 gallon) for a whole days of service. This caused San Diego MTS in California to switch over to Propane as they purchased 6 Aero Elites on F-550 chassis with the 6.8L v10 and found that it would have to be refueled, so it could run all day. However, the C5500 chassis busses have larger tanks from the factory, so they can run all day without refueling. Of course, Propane is quite expensive as it adds nearly $30,000 CAD to the price of the bus, but 76 gallon Propane tank is easily more than enough for the day.

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Ford is a good chassis, but Translink is going to need to use Propane or install a bigger tank, as the tank in that chassis is too small (40 gallon) for a whole days of service. This caused San Diego MTS in California to switch over to Propane as they purchased 6 Aero Elites on F-550 chassis with the 6.8L v10 and found that it would have to be refueled, so it could run all day. However, the C5500 chassis busses have larger tanks from the factory, so they can run all day without refueling. Of course, Propane is quite expensive as it adds nearly $30,000 CAD to the price of the bus, but 76 gallon Propane tank is easily more than enough for the day.

For some I don't think they would go with Ford because they have no chassis currently from them and no transit centre has or is planned to get propane installed for those few buses.

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For some I don't think they would go with Ford because they have no chassis currently from them and no transit centre has or is planned to get propane installed for those few buses.

Actually, Ford does have a compatible chassis (F-550) and it works good. I could see Translink installing a 2nd fuel tank which could give them a whole days service. International is a little more expensive, but good if you want diesel, as International/Navistar now offers the Cummins ISB 6.7 on that chassis, so good commonality. Propane is just a suggestion, but you do have to install the infrastructure, but it is cheaper to run and cleaner than gas and Diesel. Ford would be the direct equivalent to the C5500 chassis.

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Actually, Ford does have a compatible chassis (F-550) and it works good. I could see Translink installing a 2nd fuel tank which could give them a whole days service. International is a little more expensive, but good if you want diesel, as International/Navistar now offers the Cummins ISB 6.7 on that chassis, so good commonality. Propane is just a suggestion, but you do have to install the infrastructure, but it is cheaper to run and cleaner than gas and Diesel. Ford would be the direct equivalent to the C5500 chassis.

But for 64 propane buses that will be retired between 8 and 10 yrs of service which that doesn't justify, in my opinion, new infrastructure at transit centres.

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I would agree on that, but a 2nd gasoline tank is justifiable for a chassis that can only hold 40 gallons. Not sure if Diesel can stretch, but better be safe than sorry. Hopefully translink figures this out. 40 gallons does work on routes that have limited runs like 3 runs going one way and then 3 going back home. Not sure how the community shuttle routes are set up, but if they have limited service, then Translink should be fine. If they go International, there will likely be a bigger tank. However, it is really only an option on Ford cutaways as Roush is the one that offers LPG (Propane) for the F-550 chassis and others. 2nd gas tank does not add that much in costs compared to a Roush LPG system.

I know for a fact that San Diego MTS did a review on propane and they actually found that it saves them 15,000 USD/vehicle in fuel costs and 105,000 USD over the life of the vehicle (7 year life span). I believe it saves them 3.255 million USD over the life of 31 vehicles, so double for Translink and it does save money. 6.720 million USD for 64 minibuses over a 7 year lifespan. Propane infrastructure adds up, so you might be right that the costs might not add up, but even San Diego MTS found that it was worth a risk, but they have a no Diesel policy in Southern California and Gasoline was not going to cut it.

International does make a good chassis though, and I am thinking IC bus will win the chassis part. Diesel is pretty good, but it adds up when you have to add in the cost of Urea and Diesel fuel. Not sure what the price of gas and Diesel in Canada is at the moment.

Personally I prefer Diesel over gasoline and Propane, but Gasoline engines are not that bad performance wise. Ford 6.8L v10 and Cummins ISB provide good enough power for such vehicles.

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Propane will not power these buses can because the contract says diesel or gasoline to power these shuttles. The costs saving will not cover the infrastructure require for propane.

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I agree with that, but I could see Ford or International as Ford makes both Gas and Diesel powered F-550 chassis for mini bus. International has Diesel, but they are now working with GM to potentially offer a gas engine as to better compete with ford. How are shuttle routes set up? Do they operate all day or operate on select runs?

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Do they operate all day or operate on select runs?

Generally it's all day but some routes convert to shuttle for off-peak periods (116, 136, 134, 337, 531).

Others convert to conventional bus during peak hours (188, 214, C28, C30).

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http://ks.enconline.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ElDorado-AeroElite.pdf

http://www.glavalbus.com/models/brochures/entourage.pdf

http://www.championbus.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Defender_SS.pdf

http://www.icbus.com/~/media/Navistar/bus/Files/pdf/AC%20Series%20Sell%20Sheet-v2.ashx?la=en

Some potential contenders that fit in with the RFP as Gas or Diesel. I know Ford offers both Gas and Diesel, but International has a nice chassis, and you don't need a liquid Suspension unlike the F-550 which needs it, due to poor ride with the leaf springs. I actually googled the dealers to see which is being offered, and these seem to fit in.


In america, most cutaways are rated for a 7 year lifespan.

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5 minutes ago, dover5949 said:

Don't see a topic for the new 2017 Community shuttles so I'll put it in this topic.

New Chevrolet shuttles 17508 17509 plus others which I wasn't able to get any numbers of.

This is a better thread for this post. 

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