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Malaysia Airlines 777 crashes enroute to Beijing


hl7534
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My condolences go out to the victims and their families.

I suspect maybe something was wrong with the controls.. or maybe just a redo of the AF447 incident, where there was extreme turbulence and pitot tube issues.

The reason why is the quick descent

Pilot error played a major roll in the accident as the co pilot stalled the plane.

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I'm not buying the terrorism theory yet, its got the fewest pieces for the puzzle. Passports get stolen all the time by people trying to make it easier to get into countries that would prove more difficult with their real passports which is the most probable scenario with these individuals. Had it been a hijacking, the pilots would have had time to squawk 7500 on the transponder. Had it been a bomb, we should have found the debris by now.

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Looking back at the details of the AF447 incident, it's mentioned that the first pieces of debris were only found 5 days after the crash. That said, the Malaysian aircraft was still visible on air traffic controllers' radar at the time it went missing, whereas the Air France jet was in a vast radar dead zone and was only reported missing when it failed to check in with the next control centre that would have been able to pick it up on radar. So in theory, the area where the plane could possibly have crashed is much smaller than the AF447 search area.

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^^ Added to that no messages were sent either from the pilots or aircraft is what's still baffling. It could have been a suicide dive but if the aircraft were still in radar coverage that would have shown up as it did in the Egyptair tragedy

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^^ Transponders are electrical thus having the potential to start an electrical fire so for safety reason they have to be able to be turned off, as well if there is a problem with a transponder you need to be able to cycle it (on/off) to trouble shoot it ... I had that once when I was losing electrical systems on a cross country flight in a C172.

Needless to say, this is getting stranger and stranger by the day. Every possible scenario I can think of or hear has some flaws in it that just doesn't fit. Catastrophic failure in flight would have provided a large debris field which hasn't been found. Oxygen leak and hypoxia could explain why it hasn't been found but doesn't explain the transponder or ACARS not sending. Hijacking could explain the transponders being turned off but not the ACARS plus no one has claimed responsibility or demands. Eastern 401 comes to mind where the crew was focusing on a problem and forgot to monitor the aircrafts flight path and it crashed, and if the problem on board was something electrical it could have knocked out primary and redundant comm systems and the pilots decided to turn around, unable to communicate and they were distracted by trying to re-establish communication they forgot to fly the aircraft and it went down or even a possible ditching. Then there is always the pilot suicide possibility but why not just dive it into the ocean where you are?

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I'm not buying the terrorism theory yet, its got the fewest pieces for the puzzle. Passports get stolen all the time by people trying to make it easier to get into countries that would prove more difficult with their real passports which is the most probable scenario with these individuals. Had it been a hijacking, the pilots would have had time to squawk 7500 on the transponder. Had it been a bomb, we should have found the debris by now.

I don't often post in this particular forum, but considering that only now has there been a sattelite picking up debris, it's something in the realm of pilot error. However, if this was a terrorist act, we would've heard by now of the terror group whom are responsible. But, nothing from any of them.

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Reports now indicate pings were received seven and a half hours after take-off. In addition, it is believed the plane was flying in one of two air corridors, either northern Thailand to Kazakhstan, or one that goes into the southern areas of the Indian Ocean.

http://www.cbc.ca/m/news/#!/content/1.2574012

(Perhaps an admin can edit the name of this thread until we know for sure the aircraft went down.)

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