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General CTrain Discussion

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17 hours ago, Pantograf said:

Anderson garage is closed this weekend so all red line trains come out of Haysboro and that's the reason you see U2s and 4-car trains out there.

It was nice to see though - well, the U2's that is. The chaos across the trains and stations? Not so much... 😛

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22 minutes ago, Blake M said:

Random question: how are the sand wells on the train cars refilled? Like how do they get the sand in there?

They use a pump, similar to a fuel pump hose. There’s access doors from the outside above the trucks along the wall of the train. 

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6 minutes ago, LRT said:

They use a pump, similar to a fuel pump hose. There’s access doors from the outside above the trucks along the wall of the train. 

Thanks! My girlfriend was curious and I really didn't have an answer 😂

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4 hours ago, Blake M said:

Random question: how are the sand wells on the train cars refilled? Like how do they get the sand in there?

The sand goes into those 2 smaller outer hatches. 

20200217_115729.jpg

20200217_115818.jpg

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What exactly is the number in the corner of the windshield on the Series 5, 6, 7, and 8s. (I can't remember if the 9s have it.) I originally thought that it was the key number but Im sure I'm wrong. 

 

The big buses have a similar sign. 

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3 minutes ago, nsCEO said:

What exactly is the number in the corner of the windshield on the Series 5, 6, 7, and 8s. (I can't remember if the 9s have it.) I originally thought that it was the key number but Im sure I'm wrong. 

 

The big buses have a similar sign. 

Key number. 1-69 for Red. 70-79 for non revenue. 80-127 for Blue.

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1 minute ago, Gsgeek540 said:

Key number. 1-69 for Red. 70-79 for non revenue. 80-127 for Blue.

So I was right.

Another note I swear I have seen some vehicle that say BOOO on Halloween. 

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1 hour ago, nsCEO said:

So I was right.

Another note I swear I have seen some vehicle that say BOOO on Halloween. 

Some operators have fun with it, on buses you can have it say things like C01D when it’s cold out, BABE for Valentine’s Day, ACDC, and so forth 

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2 hours ago, vicinity said:

Some operators have fun with it, on buses you can have it say things like C01D when it’s cold out, BABE for Valentine’s Day, ACDC, and so forth 

.... I've wondered about the ACDC keys for years. Now I know...

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19 minutes ago, armorand said:

As much as I may have issues with transit within Calgary, I've gotta admit, I'm grateful its not this bad:

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/lrt-riders-suffered-unacceptable-delays-in-thursday-breakdowns-transit-boss-says/amp

Media loves to make some pretty big news with their new LRT line. Trust me we have our share with the S200s breaking down causing delays almost daily but you never hear about it on the news ...

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2 hours ago, LRT said:

Media loves to make some pretty big news with their new LRT line. Trust me we have our share with the S200s breaking down causing delays almost daily but you never hear about it on the news ...

I think things are objectively worse in Ottawa.

Calgary hasn’t had to use buses to supplement train services due to capacity issues *during normal operation.* 

The Ottawa LRT also seems to have problems with winterization, from what I’ve read this week.

Our S200 delays are frequent, I agree, but they generally aren’t catastrophic, in the sense that they don’t take down huge chunks of the system for hours on end.

I’ve also come to understand that unlike our system, there are no pocket tracks or tail tracks in Ottawa … so if a train goes down, it’s a real ordeal to get it out of the way and makes emergencies harder to manage. 

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6 hours ago, downbeat said:

I think things are objectively worse in Ottawa.

Calgary hasn’t had to use buses to supplement train services due to capacity issues *during normal operation.* 

The Ottawa LRT also seems to have problems with winterization, from what I’ve read this week.

Our S200 delays are frequent, I agree, but they generally aren’t catastrophic, in the sense that they don’t take down huge chunks of the system for hours on end.

I’ve also come to understand that unlike our system, there are no pocket tracks or tail tracks in Ottawa … so if a train goes down, it’s a real ordeal to get it out of the way and makes emergencies harder to manage. 

Plus Calgary is a much more seasoned LRT operator than Ottawa.

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So I'm under the assumption all the LRVs have some sort of ATS to keep naughty operators from exceeding the speed limit on a stretch of track. Is that what the device in the dash labeled CTS/M is for? 

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1 hour ago, nsCEO said:

So I'm under the assumption all the LRVs have some sort of ATS to keep naughty operators from exceeding the speed limit on a stretch of track. Is that what the device in the dash labeled CTS/M is for? 

80kph is the maximum allowable speed that the train can go. If the operator doesn’t keep it below 80kph an alarm will go off and you have about 3 seconds to keep it under 80kph if not the train will shut down and “overspeed”

There is no system that shuts down the train if you are exceeding the speed limit. It is the responsibility of the operator to stay within the speed limit in a specific section of track. Just like driving your car. 
 

The “CTS/M” displays the digital penalty numbers and bypass counter numbers on the Series 6,7,8 and 9 (U2s, series 5 are anolog numbers). Those numbers are logged when the train goes “online” and must stay the same when the train goes “offline” 

If a train goes past a red light on mainline the train will automatically stop and the penalty stop number will go up. Rail control will be notified and will be noted in the Ctrain log. If a light remains red and does not upgrade then control will advise the operator to bypass the signal. The bypass counter number will go up and again, the operator will log the bypass in the Ctrain log.

Hope that sums it up. 

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7 hours ago, LRT said:

80kph is the maximum allowable speed that the train can go. If the operator doesn’t keep it below 80kph an alarm will go off and you have about 3 seconds to keep it under 80kph if not the train will shut down and “overspeed”

There is no system that shuts down the train if you are exceeding the speed limit. It is the responsibility of the operator to stay within the speed limit in a specific section of track. Just like driving your car. 
 

The “CTS/M” displays the digital penalty numbers and bypass counter numbers on the Series 6,7,8 and 9 (U2s, series 5 are anolog numbers). Those numbers are logged when the train goes “online” and must stay the same when the train goes “offline” 

If a train goes past a red light on mainline the train will automatically stop and the penalty stop number will go up. Rail control will be notified and will be noted in the Ctrain log. If a light remains red and does not upgrade then control will advise the operator to bypass the signal. The bypass counter number will go up and again, the operator will log the bypass in the Ctrain log.

Hope that sums it up. 

Wait, so they can actually go faster than 80kph? I always thought they were speed limited to 80kph or can they only do over 80 with the help of a negative incline?

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1 hour ago, nsCEO said:

Wait, so they can actually go faster than 80kph? I always thought they were speed limited to 80kph or can they only do over 80 with the help of a negative incline?

With newer trains (ie. not U2s), the train is speed limited/governed to 80km/h unless you’re headed downhill. U2s will keep powering until they alarm and over speed shutdown. The old U2 AC cars (now just Scout) actually had speedos that went up to 100km/h, but you couldn’t get there.   As LRT mentioned, there’s nothing to hold a train at a lower speed than 80km/h, so if the limit for a section of track is 40km/h (like 7 Avenue), it’s up to the operator to hold it there. 
 

The series 9 trains also have a ‘cruise control’ that will hold your speed, including on a downhill slope, if activated. 

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2 hours ago, CTrainDude said:

 As LRT mentioned, there’s nothing to hold a train at a lower speed than 80km/h, so if the limit for a section of track is 40km/h (like 7 Avenue), it’s up to the operator to hold it there. 

That's interesting. Edmonton does have some speed control in certain areas to enforce speed limits slower than 70 km/r. It's not on board* like Calgary's 80 km/h and Edmonton's 70 km/h system limit. I'm not 100% certain how it works, other than there are magnets for speed checks. I wouldn't be surprised if there are other components like wheel sensors in use. ETS's Design Guidelines say that they are used before stations, interlocking, or other areas as determined where enforced braking is required. 

*CBTC will of course shut a train down for overspeed at any speed limit on the NLRT extension beyond McEwan. At least until that system is replaced.

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35 minutes ago, M. Parsons said:

That's interesting. Edmonton does have some speed control for slower sections of track. It's not on board* like Calgary's 80 km/h and Edmonton's 70 km/h system limit. I'm not 100% certain how it works, other than there are magnets for speed checks. I wouldn't be surprised if there are other components like wheel sensors in use. 

I believe the wheels travel through a timed section. If the wheels travel through that section outside the allowed time the magnet becomes active and will shut down the train. There nicknamed “Speed dumps”
 

Calgary had a “speed dump” on 7th Avenue back in the 80s near the old 8th street location but later removed when 10th street station was built. 

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23 minutes ago, LRT said:

I believe the wheels travel through a timed section. If the wheels travel through that section outside the allowed time the magnet becomes active and will shut down the train. There nicknamed “Speed dumps”
 

Calgary had a “speed dump” on 7th Avenue back in the 80s near the old 8th street location but later removed when 10th street station was built. 

The only similar legacy left is at Haysboro- if you’re crossing over going outbound to the motormans platform (or beyond), you get the approach at A84A, and A86 stays red until you’ve approached it slowly.   If you move too fast, you won’t get the upgrade before you arrive, and you’ll have to stop, or get dumped.  Designed that way to keep people from hitting the crossover going 80km/h by mistake. 

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3 hours ago, chills_on_the_train said:

Has this ever happened?

Damn they should have that on buses. Some drivers fly down the 14 Street transitway

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