octranspobusfreak

The Confederation Line [Under Construction]

431 posts in this topic

Oops! Looks like we posted at the exact same time. In my opinion this topic deserves its own thread, which is why I posted it separately.

No worries i agree with Jcl

One thing i noticed Campus will be above ground instead of below and no Laurier Stn (This stn is always busy)

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Although their consortium doesn't have a rolling stock manufacturer listed, their facebook pictures show Alstom units and the Citizen article confirms this. I believe this will be their first use in North America, and along with the Coradia LINT trains coming next year we should have a city full of unique vehicles. I would have rather seen Bombardier units, and I know they were pushing hard for this with units similar to the Eglinton line, but apparently the Alstoms will be built in the city. I imagine Bombardier would be quite busy in Thunder Bay with the Toronto order already in the 2015-2020 timeframe.

Any idea where these things are going to be assembled? I would assume it will be knock down kit assembly from France, but it should still be a fair amount of work, will the maintenance facility be big enough for that?

Anyone know what the third group that didn't get it, the "Rideau Transit Partners" was proposing for rolling stock?

EDIT: Found it, the third group proposed Siemens.

Edited by Flalex72

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I like how it will bring 100 new jobs to 805 Belfast as vehicle assembly will be done there

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Anyone else having issues with that Confrd link web site?

I'm just getting the frontpage with a list of dates and times, none of the promised pics are up yet (they're up elsewhere).

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No works for me

No issues for me either.

I'm just getting the frontpage with a list of dates and times, none of the promised pics are up yet (they're up elsewhere).

All of the renderings and pictures are there; they've been available since about 10am this morning. Click the arrows on the left and right of the slideshow window to navigate through the showcase. To jump ahead to a specific spot, you can use the links on the right, then click through the slideshow.

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I can acces it but it moves very slowly when I try scrolling through it and when "click" on different links it takes for ever to loaqd. Have Bell Extreme High Speed so it can be that?

from what I can tell and someone correct me if I'm wrong, if they go by those pics of the LRT, there won't be any over head wires it'll be like a subway third rail p[wer, hence the track on ground level will need to fenced in to preven people from getting ZAPPED!!

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No issues for me either.

All of the renderings and pictures are there; they've been available since about 10am this morning. Click the arrows on the left and right of the slideshow window to navigate through the showcase. To jump ahead to a specific spot, you can use the links on the right, then click through the slideshow.

That works. It's http://www.ottawalightrail.ca/ that doesn't show anything.

For others, the correst link (from the GOA thread):

http://www.ottawalig...x.php#&panel1-2

from what I can tell and someone correct me if I'm wrong, if they go by those pics of the LRT, there won't be any over head wires it'll be like a subway third rail p[wer, hence the track on ground level will need to fenced in to preven people from getting ZAPPED!!

I see wires in some of the pictures. They're hidden but you can see posts in the centre of the stations.

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One thing i noticed Campus will be above ground instead of below and no Laurier Stn (This stn is always busy)

I wonder if part of the reason behind this was to dissuade the droves of uOttawa students from boarding at Laurier and getting off at Rideau. (I for one abused that a lot when I used to go there :P ) Probably way more to it than that, lol.

I like the aesthetics of the station designs. Seems pretty in-line with the North American styles in this decade. The overhead direction signs on the platforms feel very TTC-ish to me (ex. http://www.ottawalightrail.ca/indexfr.php#&panel1-52).

Also, kinda amusing to see this heavy rail-like infrastructure being built for what is essentially a tram. Exciting development, though! Definitely looking forward to seeing its implementation.

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I wonder if part of the reason behind this was to dissuade the droves of uOttawa students from boarding at Laurier and getting off at Rideau. (I for one abused that a lot when I used to go there :P ) Probably way more to it than that, lol.

I like the aesthetics of the station designs. Seems pretty in-line with the North American styles in this decade. The overhead direction signs on the platforms feel very TTC-ish to me (ex. http://www.ottawalig....php#&panel1-52).

Also, kinda amusing to see this heavy rail-like infrastructure being built for what is essentially a tram. Exciting development, though! Definitely looking forward to seeing its implementation.

I've taken the #4 2 stops across the Carleton Campus :)

On the topic of Laurier, what are the chances it remains in use as a bus station, along with the rest of the DT transitway? No changes would be required on the west end, since busses could continue right along Albert street and onto Scott, connecting to Tunney's. On the east end, Waller could be turned into a ramp off of Nicholas, and busses from Laurier can make a right onto Laurier and left onto Nicholas. This would allow access to Hurdman via the 417 and Riverside dr. There are always cases of people who would rather stay on their bus than switch if they have to go only a few more stops, even if it takes longer you already have a seat and don't have to gamble about making a connection. Local routes could also make use of the Downtown lanes.

I think when it's done it will feel quite heavy, those trains aren't short. It makes me wonder why it's not high floor though, the vehicles would be cheaper in the long term. St. Louis, Edmonton, Vancouver and London DLR come to mind. It might just be that there's a chance it has to run in mixed traffic in the future, but that doesn't seem to stop others, like Riverline in NJ.

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Here's a link to the meeting agenda. It has links to more data, mostly in the first box. Bayview will be built to accomodate a second O-Train platform, but it makes no mention of if the existing tracks will be moved.

http://app05.ottawa.ca/sirepub/mtgviewer.aspx?meetid=2447&doctype=AGENDA

Here's a link to the meeting agenda. It has links to more data, mostly in the first box. Bayview will be built to accomodate a second O-Train platform, but it makes no mention of if the existing tracks will be moved. Thales SelTrac will be the signalling system.

http://app05.ottawa....&doctype=AGENDA

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I can't wait to see these excellent station designs introduced at the rail stops, which no doubt have actually been designed by architects, unlike the ugly, embarrassing, unappealing red pieces of junk transitway stations that were built by engineers who have no clue about design.

I sure hope the tunnel will finally be the key to revitalizing Sparks St...ditto for Lebreton.

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My question about this project is whether that small height between rail and train is going to do it... doesn't Ottawa get like a lot of snow? =S

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My question about this project is whether that small height between rail and train is going to do it... doesn't Ottawa get like a lot of snow? =S

I don't think that's the final vehicle design in the renders, there is a model at the design showcases that looks much more final with bogies further towards the end that whch would allow for some snowplows to be mounted. With frequent all day running they should be able to keep the line clear, there will probably be some MOW equipment with a plow or blower for early in the mornings if it's really bad.

An interesting point is that although the vehicles are bidirectional, they are not symmetrical. The end unit has two doors, the next unit has one door and the single pantograph, the third unit has two doors, and the end has two again. I think the middle ones might also be different legnths, with the longer one having one door, double bogies and the pantograph, the shorter one having two doors and a single bogie.

The person at the display at Rideau Center today had some interesting points. Fare control gates are not in the budget, they will be an addon but the stations are designed for it.The downtown transitway will be closed and converted to wider sidewalks and bike lanes or similar, pending review. The trains are also longer than the original specification, the consortium apparently asked if they could go longer then the 30 meter design spec, so now they will run 2 car instead of 3 car trains. He also says that at 24000 PPH this will be likely the highest capacity transit line in Canada that's not a Subway, and they they have had issues with the term "light rail" being misinterpreted quite frequently. All interesting stuff.

EDIT: Found a video with a different tram deisgn that matches the model they're displaying, including interior shots:

http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/ID/2312982988/

Edited by Flalex72

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Here's a link to the meeting agenda. It has links to more data, mostly in the first box. Bayview will be built to accomodate a second O-Train platform, but it makes no mention of if the existing tracks will be moved.

http://app05.ottawa....&doctype=AGENDA

The links to the appendices now seem to be working (I was having trouble with those when the agenda was first posted).

Appendix 1 gives a detailed overview of the design of each station (link to PDF): http://app05.ottawa....gs&fileid=34820

I noticed that Tunney's Pasture will be a side platform station. How will that work, given that Tunney's will be the western terminus of the line? In my very limited experience, I've only ever encountered centre platform terminus stations. Is it just as simple as having signage directing passengers to the platform where the next train will depart?

EDIT: Found some answers here (including the comments section): http://www.transitot...ys-pasture.html

Edited by octranspobusfreak

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The links to the appendices now seem to be working (I was having trouble with those when the agenda was first posted).

Appendix 1 gives a detailed overview of the design of each station (link to PDF): http://app05.ottawa....gs&fileid=34820

I noticed that Tunney's Pasture will be a side platform station. How will that work, given that Tunney's will be the western terminus of the line? In my very limited experience, I've only ever encountered centre platform terminus stations. Is it just as simple as having signage directing passengers to the platform where the next train will depart?

EDIT: Found some answers here (including the comments section): http://www.transitot...ys-pasture.html

Without reading the link, I'd guess the reason is that Tunney's eventually won't be the western terminus.

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I've taken the #4 2 stops across the Carleton Campus :)

The joys of having a bus pass!

I think when it's done it will feel quite heavy, those trains aren't short. It makes me wonder why it's not high floor though, the vehicles would be cheaper in the long term. St. Louis, Edmonton, Vancouver and London DLR come to mind. It might just be that there's a chance it has to run in mixed traffic in the future, but that doesn't seem to stop others, like Riverline in NJ.

Low-floors would probably work better in the case of Carling being the chosen corridor for the western expansion. That way it could run down the median without having to dig a sunken ditch for the train or some other type of grade-adjustment. I definitely don't think mixed traffic is a good idea. The city is spending over a billion to have high-end fully separated infrastructure to have a reliable, efficient train. Having mixed traffic, even in the outer areas, would defeat the purpose imo.

As for Tunney's, basically what 8792 said. If I recall correctly, it was never intended to be more than a temporary terminus while the city figures out what alignment the western segment will take. I remember early planning in 2007-2008 always stating it should end at Baseline, but they don't know how to get there (since the NCC seems resistant to having trains on the Ottawa River Parkway.) Therefore, Phase I will be to Tunney's with it continuing to Baseline ASAP. Again, this is off the top of my head.

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I'm well aware that Tunney's is only intended to be a temporary terminus. It still seems silly to me to build it with side platforms, especially given the amount of people that will be transferring there heading into downtown. Think about how much of a pain it will be to head down to the appropriate platform but just miss that train. Instead of simply turning around and hopping onto the next one, riders will likely have to head all the way back up and over to the other side to catch the next departing train.

Why is it that people often associate side platform configurations with in-line stations? Lebreton and Cyrville have centre platforms and they're in-line stations. Why can't there be a centre platform at Tunney's as well?

In the link I posted, someone offered this explanation: "The reason there isn't a centre platform at Tunney's is the clearance. Under the track is a giant sewer; above it are several bridges. Moving the tracks to the sides of the cut (to allow for a centre platform) apparently runs into clearance problems."

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I'm well aware that Tunney's is only intended to be a temporary terminus. It still seems silly to me to build it with side platforms, especially given the amount of people that will be transferring there heading into downtown. Think about how much of a pain it will be to head down to the appropriate platform but just miss that train. Instead of simply turning around and hopping onto the next one, riders will likely have to head all the way back up and over to the other side to catch the next departing train.

I know - I do happen to agree with your sentiment. I think it's poor planning, even if it's temporary. Especially considering what a bottleneck it'll be once everyone west-end has to transfer through there. For a temporary solution, I think the article you linked proposed something that could work:

"If the city is insistent on the side platform configuration, they should allow only one platform open for service while the other platform should be used for trains going out of service once it drops off passengers. This would accomplish two things: 1. no one would enter an out-of service train by accident and 2. there would be no confusion as to which platform to step on. The Toronto Transit Commission employs this method at a few of their transit stations. This arrangement makes the most sense to me."

Why is it that people often associate side platform configurations with in-line stations? Lebreton and Cyrville have centre platforms and they're in-line stations. Why can't there be a centre platform at Tunney's as well?

In the link I posted, someone offered this explanation: "The reason there isn't a centre platform at Tunney's is the clearance. Under the track is a giant sewer; above it are several bridges. Moving the tracks to the sides of the cut (to allow for a centre platform) apparently runs into clearance problems."

Personally, I don't make that association. Glencairn, Lawrence West, York Mills, Sheppard, Leslie, Bayview, Bessarion are all examples of in-line TTC stations with centre platforms. As for Tunney's - sounds plausible, though I can't really say since I'm not an engineer.

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the one thing I hate about this is, that city council & OC Transpo hasn't told the public the truth about once the LRT is up and running.

The issue is presently you can catch one bus(Express) from Orleans and it will take you straight downtown. Once the LRT is open I can almost guarantee you can say good-bye to the express buses from Orleans. They'll make you take a local bus(most Orleans locals will probally be extended to Blair Station)where you'll be FORCED to transfer to the LRT.

Another thing is most(not all) of the express buses coming out of Orleans go to Hull. So since the LRT won't be going to Hull, those working in Terrace du Chiedier or Place du Portage will need to tranfer twice.

Once from the Orleans to the LRT.

Then LRT to a bus going to Hull.

Yes I know the the LRT ho;ds hundreds of people.

But once those passengers get off the LRT they'll need to transfer to a bus, and thats where there going to have a problem. How do you fit hundres of passengers that would normally be on a 95 or a Orleans Express bus.

The LRT is not bad concept in moving passengers, but the issue of transfers. If you live with walking distance of the LRT then its not bad, but if need to transfer thats where you have an issue.If you miss your transfer wil OC guarantee you that your local bus will be less then a 5 min wait? I don't think so. OC will have people packed in buses like sardines.

Time schedules? Will the LRT bre 24/7 service?

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