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GTA Urban Express Rail Grid


Julianli
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Hello, everyone.

From last summer, I tried to make a rapid rail transit plan using surface rail corridors for Toronto; I called it as U-Train plan. In February, 2012, I got the final U-Train version (the fourth updating version) and named it as GTA Urban Express Rail Grid plan. Now, I post it here for your discussion. You can read the plan at

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Or download it at http://www.slideshar...press-rail-grid.

GTA Urban Express Rail Grid uses existing surface rail corridors for public rapid rail transit covering most Toronto area with two loops, one is GTA loop, and another is Toronto Downtown loop. You can find the detail in my 106 pages ppt. Some main properties of the system are listed below.

  • Two Loops together with two U2 express rail, consist of a vital arterial electrified rapid rail transit grid.
  • Reasonably combine commuter service and urban transit in go train corridors, using one investment for two services.
  • High area coverage and reasonable station spacing can achieve high ridership for the high speed grid, making the system to be operated economically.
  • 80 % Toronto people can take 5 minutes bus or 10 minutes bike to a Rapid Transit Station in the system. Intermediate transit model normally is not necessary.
  • Existing point radiation transit system from Union Station will be changed.
  • Can be finished with existing transit fund, making the best use of public fund. Tax increasing and special levy are not necessary.
I sent the plan to Toronto City Council, Metrolinx and Ontario Ministry of Transportation in February, 2012. Although most feedbacks are very positive, the problem is : the plan gives out a possible economical final solution for Toronto transit, and according to the plan, many existing transit plans might not be necessary or need big updating , these changes are quite not easily made by those authorities. For example, Eglinton Cross-town LRT and Sheppard Subway are not necessary if the GTA Urban Express Rail Grid can be adopted, and the Grid can be finished with existing transit fund. Even Big Move plan could be updated with a total cost less than 30 billion for 30 -40 % cut of commuting time, not at existing estimation of 50 billion for cutting 7 minutes of commuting time.
I post the plan here and let people and transit professionals to discuss, comment and criticise it. If you think that the plan is really worth these transit plan changes from the authorities, please speak out to them.
I would apologize for my some kind awkward English as a ten years’ immigrant. There are also some grammar errors in the presentation, but I chose not to rewrite the presentation and keep it as the original one that I sent to the authorities.
Thank you very much.

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GTAloop.jpg

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I'll be honest. I'm glad to see someone trying to initiate potential change with actual thought. Kudos.

I used to be a proponent of increasing/adding to existing rail corridors to provide rapid transit services, but there are a lot of issues that need to be touched upon.

For example, in order to 'relieve' Union Station of vehicular traffic, you suggest using a grid system. I don't disagree. But what it could make for is a net inconvenience to passengers, which is ironically what the system is trying to improve. Another example is that some corridors are physically too small (i.e. Stouffville corridor at Agincourt station - you'll need quite a bit of expropriation there). Other issues are goods movement and energy requirements.

I have a lot more things to talk about, but I'll have to go through your plan in detail.

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  • Can be finished with existing transit fund, making the best use of public fund. Tax increasing and special levy are not necessary.

     

Considering that you are asking CN and CP to sacrifice space on their transcontinental mainlines through Toronto, their demands will not be cheap; especially considering that trains can no longer bypass Toronto when travelling between eastern and western canada.

Also, does your plan involve abandoning the RT between Kennedy and Ellesmere?

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Considering that you are asking CN and CP to sacrifice space on their transcontinental mainlines through Toronto, their demands will not be cheap; especially considering that trains can no longer bypass Toronto when travelling between eastern and western canada.

This is also my concern. I see some of the routes he proposed are operating on the mainline tracks.

What about the Finch west, Eglinton Crosstown and Sheppard east LRT's that are being built?

I'll assume they're there as well, just that he forgot to add them.

Looking simply at the maps (haven't watched the video yet), Union Station still remains as one of the major missing pieces in the puzzle in terms of handling the frequencies and lines you propose. If a second downtown hub can be built somewhere (or divert one of the lines underground to King/Queen Street... *gulp*), then this plan could be of a higher logical sense.

Regardless, not bad.

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I'll be honest. I'm glad to see someone trying to initiate potential change with actual thought. Kudos.

I used to be a proponent of increasing/adding to existing rail corridors to provide rapid transit services, but there are a lot of issues that need to be touched upon.

For example, in order to 'relieve' Union Station of vehicular traffic, you suggest using a grid system. I don't disagree. But what it could make for is a net inconvenience to passengers, which is ironically what the system is trying to improve. Another example is that some corridors are physically too small (i.e. Stouffville corridor at Agincourt station - you'll need quite a bit of expropriation there). Other issues are goods movement and energy requirements.

I have a lot more things to talk about, but I'll have to go through your plan in detail.

The Union Station is a transit bottleneck that we have to meet with. For inter-city commuter, the only inconvenience is that they have to interchange to GTA Loop or Downtown Loop travelling in the Down Town, but they still can travel to Union Station, and the traveling time is no longer than the existing time (I put it as the precondition for speed and station spacing estimation). I think the commuter service could be improved: 1) they have many choices for trip destination, not only Union Station. 2) high service frequency ( 3 minutes one train), even for planed full day tow ways go service , the service frequency would be limited by commuter ridership.3) Integration fare system with local transit.

The change is that the number of rail route arriving to Union Station will be decreased a lot to relief the bottleneck of track and platform capacity.

Stouffville corridor at Agincourt station is enough for two tracks, I am living at Agincourt GO Station, they just developed a parking lot along the line.

You are welcome to continue commenting the plan, Thank you.

What about the Finch west, Eglinton Crosstown and Sheppard east LRT's that are being built?

In my opinion, Finch west, Eglinton Crosstown and Sheppard east LRT are not necessary. When you can get HRT system matched well with 5 minutes feeder buses, there would be no need of Intermediated Transit Model like LRT. Many Scarborough residents dislike LRT.

Considering that you are asking CN and CP to sacrifice space on their transcontinental mainlines through Toronto, their demands will not be cheap; especially considering that trains can no longer bypass Toronto when travelling between eastern and western canada.

Also, does your plan involve abandoning the RT between Kennedy and Ellesmere?

The CN and CP freight line are not impacted very much by the plan. Some corridors are already sold to go train, and at CN corridor of York Subdivision, CP corridor of North Toronto Subdivision and CP corridor of Mactier Subdivision, new tracks will be built at the side of CN and CP mainline. The only route need totally sacrificed is CP Down Branch. The CN and CP freight train can pass by Toronto as before, just they cannot reach Union Station by CP Down Branch.

I have to mention that all CN and CP corridors impacted by GTA urban express rail grid, have already been planned for commuter service by Big Move Plan.

There will be no RT between Kennedy and Ellesmere, The RT will connect the GTA LOOP at Ellesmere Station. Some existing track between Kennedy and Ellesmere might be used by the GTA LOOP.

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In my opinion, Finch west, Eglinton Crosstown and Sheppard east LRT are not necessary. When you can get HRT system matched well with 5 minutes feeder buses, there would be no need of Intermediated Transit Model like LRT. Many Scarborough residents dislike LRT.

While your network will work decently well to move people from the inner suburbs to downtown (and vice versa) during the rush hours, it will do almost nothing for cross town travel and people travelling from suburb to suburb. Based on this one statement here, you seem to have bought into the common misconception that everyone's destination is downtown Toronto, and we have to orient the transit network to solely serve this demand. Nowadays, in Toronto, this simply isn't the case. This is why many of the lines are being built in the suburbs - to provide higher-order transit in the suburbs to meet the need for these cross-town trips. Downtown may be the biggest destination during AM peak, but it isn't the only one, and it's also no longer the destination for the majority of trips.

Cross-town travel is also much stronger during off-peak periods, and this is the sector of transit trips in Toronto that is growing the fastest.

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Well, there's another issue that comes up just by taking over the rail corridor and turning it into full rapid transit.

Let's talk about Stouffville for a bit. You're going to face poor commuter times for someone commuting in from north of Centennial, so you'd need to continue running the GO service.

However, since you are proposing a rapid transit service with proposed headways of 3 minutes - you will not be able to safely run GO trains and rapid transit along the same tracks. Even currently the ARL is receiving two dedicated tracks along GTS, and that's with 15 minute headways. So you'd need three tracks - two 'local' and one 'express', like on the New York City subway where the GO train would run peak-direction only, making only specific station stops. That would require huge station changes. As for Agincourt, yes, they've added a parking lot - but to reduce costs, I think the only location that a new track can go is on the east side of the existing track - so expropriation of quite a few homes is required.

I recommend looking at the I-METRO-E proposal - which is very similar to what you are suggesting, but only involving the Stouffville corridor - for it states that it'll be able to actually carry less people than what the GO system will be able to. Lakeshore East is still an issue no matter what proposal you choose though.

Honestly, adding off-peak GO service/improving/electrifying GO service will already have quite the effect on the system - for non-AM peak travel, I think it's more of a fare systems/integration issue than provision of more and more lines.

Back to Union station - you assume that your interchanges will be perfect. Those three minutes could be surprisingly critical to a commuter.

Even though some corridors are owned by Metrolinx, I'm sure that freight would eventually like to use it...and if you remove the inability for freight to use the corridor, it'll introduce trucks, and well, you know the rest. Goods movement is a bigger issue than one would think.

Random question - how do you plan to power your electrified lines? Renewably?

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I also agree with your post above new.flyer.408, although from the outset I will claim a bit of a conflict of interest, as I do live along the GO line north of Unionville (and will return to being a daily commuter in September).

For the I-METRO-E proposal, which is the origin of those lines being proposed in both the OneCity plan and your plan Julianli, they simply propose taking over the corridor without thought to what occurs further up the line. The current GO trains (which a 10-car train holds up to 1500 seated passengers) are full by the time they travel from Stouffville to Unionville. The other GO lines are in a similar situation where they are filled in the outer suburbs. You can't begin to tell me that these areas aren't important to serve. How do you plan on filling the capacity of these lines anyway? Transfer at Unionville or Agincourt? How do you fit 1500 passengers onto a set of trains that can only fill 300 at the most?

Personally the answer is just additional GO service. Run the current trains express south of Unionville on a 20 minute frequency; add short-turn trains serving all local stops south of Unionville again every 20 minutes. This will roughly triple capacity along the corridor and you can do it with only 2 tracks, instead of having to use 3 tracks and less than double capacity. The only weak point in both our plans though is the capacity issue at Union.

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While your network will work decently well to move people from the inner suburbs to downtown (and vice versa) during the rush hours, it will do almost nothing for cross town travel and people travelling from suburb to suburb. Based on this one statement here, you seem to have bought into the common misconception that everyone's destination is downtown Toronto, and we have to orient the transit network to solely serve this demand. Nowadays, in Toronto, this simply isn't the case. This is why many of the lines are being built in the suburbs - to provide higher-order transit in the suburbs to meet the need for these cross-town trips. Downtown may be the biggest destination during AM peak, but it isn't the only one, and it's also no longer the destination for the majority of trips.

Cross-town travel is also much stronger during off-peak periods, and this is the sector of transit trips in Toronto that is growing the fastest.

Thank you reply,

I disagree with the point of `` it will do almost nothing for cross town travel and people travelling from suburb to suburb``, remember there are loops in the Grid, it is quite better for people travel between west and east suburb. For example, if I want to go to Humber College from Agincourt, I will take the express rail to north and west direction, arrive Martin Grove Station in 33 minutes, then I can take several minutes bus to the college.

The capacity of Cross-town LRT is not designed for the off-peak load at Eglinton Ave, and I can say that bus line is obviously strong enough for off-peak load. Why do we need an expensive LRT for off-peak load?

As I mentioned in slide 14, we can release the transit congestion at a road without building a transit along the road. When we skip out of this thought trip, our transit route can be planned in more flexible way. I understand that there would be better if we can get small east-west express connection in the midway of GTA loop, but I think some express east-west bus lines that only stop at rapid rail station are good enough. Even when we need a middle connection with the Grid , I prefer to select some road more north than Eglinton, because Eglinton is too close to Down town loop, and the express rail also can be built not along the road to reduce the cost.

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Well, there's another issue that comes up just by taking over the rail corridor and turning it into full rapid transit.

The part of Stouffville go train north than Unionville will still be go train line or local express rail service, the passenger will interchange to GTA loop at Unionville Station, there would be no more express go train in the Grid. The passenger volume will be absorbed by high frequency operation, and the traveling time is no change.

Metrolink could be the operator of the Grid

For the I-METRO-E proposal, which is the origin of those lines being proposed in both the OneCity plan and your plan Julianli, they simply propose taking over the corridor without thought to what occurs further up the line.

I began to develop the U-Train plan at last summer, York Region Councillor Jim Jones got my 2rd U-rain version from a Toronto Councillor in October,2011, and met me once in November, after that I sent him a copy when I updated my plan. He though the plan should be more beneficial to Markham local transit, actually , I managed to add the Unionville Station into the GTA Loop according to his opinion, but He like develop a plan better for Markham resident

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. The current GO trains (which a 10-car train holds up to 1500 seated passengers) are full by the time they travel from Stouffville to Unionville. The other GO lines are in a similar situation where they are filled in the outer suburbs. You can't begin to tell me that these areas aren't important to serve. How do you plan on filling the capacity of these lines anyway? Transfer at Unionville or Agincourt? How do you fit 1500 passengers onto a set of trains that can only fill 300 at the most?

Just remember that the local go train still will be updated to be higher frequency , right now the frequency is one train in half hour, when the frequency is one train in ten minutes, then the amount of passenger in each train will be decreased, say 800 to 1000 passengers per train. When go passengers interchange to U-Train, the frequency is one train in 3 minutes, you still can easily find a seat in the U-Train.

Even though some corridors are owned by Metrolinx, I'm sure that freight would eventually like to use it...and if you remove the inability for freight to use the corridor, it'll introduce trucks, and well, you know the rest. Goods movement is a bigger issue than one would think.

Freight train might use the grid tracks from 0:30 am to 5 am.
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I'm not going to continue to argue with you over this scenario as it's pretty pointless. All I will say is that in order to plan the GTA successfully, you need to think of more than just the 416 (old City of Toronto and the "inner suburbs" like Scarborough, North York, Etobicoke). So far you're just focusing on the T.

The first major flaw in your plan I've already addressed (pretending like cross-regional travel doesn't exist). Your second major flaw is thinking that the 2000 passengers dropped off from a GO train will easily fit onto your U-Train. I-METRO-E was stated to have the same maximum capacity with trains running every 3 minutes that one GO train can carry with a 30 minute headway. I don't see how you expect to serve Toronto with local stops when GO passengers will use the entire capacity right from the starting point. Also, expecting 2000 passengers dropped off at the same instant will easily filter into different trains with a much lower capacity is borderline insanity.

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I disagree with the point of `` it will do almost nothing for cross town travel and people travelling from suburb to suburb``, remember there are loops in the Grid, it is quite better for people travel between west and east suburb. For example, if I want to go to Humber College from Agincourt, I will take the express rail to north and west direction, arrive Martin Grove Station in 33 minutes, then I can take several minutes bus to the college.

The big issue with this is to try and convince the commuters that your method is faster. Your plan takes the commuter way north, west, then back south. However, many passengers would not think that way and simply go west and a bit north to get from Agincourt to Humber College. It's a simple psychological barrier that makes them think the most direct route/the shortest route is the fastest route. Based solely on that, I'm not convinced that their commuting times will improve with your rail plan up in the inner suburbs.

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The forum discussion is awesome, if my frank remark is not so polite, I could say sorry for that. The discussion seems become a kind of argument, then everyone can not easily change the idea. I think that I already explained how a high frequency high speed service can absorb the passengers volume from a low frequency service.

It's a simple psychological barrier that makes them think the most direct route/the shortest route is the fastest route. Based solely on that, I'm not convinced that their commuting times will improve with your rail plan up in the inner suburbs.

The shortest route is not always the faster route, Like a shortest route in local traffic can take more time than a longer route but in highway, I think that many people have the similar experience.

So with all that freight traffic using these lines in the middle of the night, when do you plan to schedule regular maitenence?

I say that freight train might use the grid tracks from 0:30 am to 5 am, which will be very seldom case, because our friend point out the Inability for freight to use the corridor in the plan. I never see a freight train travelling on Stouffville go train line in Toronto, but if some freight train have to use the corridor in special reason , they might use the corridor at certain midnight. Normally , the time is for maintenance .
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I say that freight train might use the grid tracks from 0:30 am to 5 am, which will be very seldom case, because our friend point out the Inability for freight to use the corridor in the plan. I never see a freight train travelling on Stouffville go train line in Toronto, but if some freight train have to use the corridor in special reason , they might use the corridor at certain midnight. Normally , the time is for maintenance .

CN still gets a fair amount of traffic on the Stouffville line other wise CN would have sold/leased out the freight rights long ago!

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CN still gets a fair amount of traffic on the Stouffville line other wise CN would have sold/leased out the freight rights long ago!

Thank your reply, Do you have any detail information for that ? It is really appreciated if anyone has the detail information about that.
For my personal observation, I haven not seen any freight train on the south section of Stouffville go train line in Toronto. If there are a fair mount of freight traffic on Stouffville line, they mostly could be on the north section of the line out of Toronto, and our Grid just use the south section in the Toronto.
Anyway, for this issue, I can list out the possible scenarios from the best one to the worst one like these:
  1. all the CN freight trains only pass by the north part of Stouffville line, not coming into Toronto.

     

  2. Some freight trains go into Toronto, but after suitable agreement with CN, these trains can change their routes.

     

  3. Several freight trains have to go into Toronto on Stouffville line. The Grid will open one or two midnights for freight operation, but keep five to six nights for maintenance .

     

  4. The grade separations for freight service and Urban Express Grid are too complicate by heavy freights near Unionville Station, the Grid has to give up including the station in GTA loop.

     

  5. We have to put in three tracks in the south section of Stouffville line, because of busy freight operation on it.

     

At the worst condition, we have to expropriate some area of backyards of homes along the line at Agincourt , then you can find that those backyards normally are really spacious. Metrolinx has expropriated parts of home backyards on west side of the line for the parking lot, they should can do the same way for the space of the third track on east side.

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Thank your reply, Do you have any detail information for that ? It is really appreciated if anyone has the detail information about that.
For my personal observation, I haven not seen any freight train on the south section of Stouffville go train line in Toronto. If there are a fair mount of freight traffic on Stouffville line, they mostly could be on the north section of the line out of Toronto, and our Grid just use the south section in the Toronto.
Anyway, for this issue, I can list out the possible scenarios from the best one to the worst one like these:
  1. all the CN freight trains only pass by the north part of Stouffville line, not coming into Toronto.

     

  2. Some freight trains go into Toronto, but after suitable agreement with CN, these trains can change their routes.

     

  3. Several freight trains have to go into Toronto on Stouffville line. The Grid will open one or two midnights for freight operation, but keep five to six nights for maintenance .

     

  4. The grade separations for freight service and Urban Express Grid are too complicate by heavy freights near Unionville Station, the Grid has to give up including the station in GTA loop.

     

  5. We have to put in three tracks in the south section of Stouffville line, because of busy freight operation on it.

     

At the worst condition, we have to expropriate some area of backyards of homes along the line at Agincourt , then you can find that those backyards normally are really spacious. Metrolinx has expropriated parts of home backyards on west side of the line for the parking lot, they should can do the same way for the space of the third track on east side.

The line is just used for local on line customers no through traffic. Service wouldnt be daily but at least 2-4 times a week service.

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The line is just used for local on line customers no through traffic. Service wouldnt be daily but at least 2-4 times a week service.

Thank you very much, it is not too bad, and there is a trend of decreasing for local industrial user, we will see the detail if we have the chance to formally study the plan.

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found a good article of Greg Gormick published on May 30, 2011, which can be a good supporting material.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/999737--a-rapid-transit-fix-for-toronto

A rapid transit fix for Toronto

Published on Monday May 30, 2011

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Greg Gormick

18 Comments

In the quest to resolve the transportation problems bedevilling Toronto, our politicians and planners have proposed every solution except the most obvious one: greater use of our underused urban rail corridors.

While GO was expanded geographically after its launch on the Lakeshore Line in 1967, its growth rate has been glacial and inadequate funding has shackled it to an outdated, long-haul suburban service pattern. It provides only morning-in, afternoon-out weekday service to Union Station on all its rail lines except the Lakeshore, where there’s a paltry hourly service off-peak. Less appealing bus service fills the wide gaps elsewhere.

Just bulking up this bare-bones rail operation with more 10-car diesel trains would still leave serious flaws, one of which is that GO’s oversized trains fail to serve many transit-starved Toronto neighbourhoods. They are likely to remain so under Mayor Rob Ford’s expensive and geographically challenged subway scheme, which has replaced the broader and more affordable light rail transit (LRT) vision of former mayor David Miller.

What Toronto requires is the conversion of GO into an urban railway. The concept was born in 1924 with the creation of Berlin’s Stadtschnellbahn or S-Bahn — the world’s first “fast city railway.” The S-Bahn converted key suburban lines into a network that vastly increased urban transportation options and benefits.

The urban rail principles first proved on the Berlin S-Bahn include:

• High frequency, usually 5-10 minutes within the city and 15-20 minutes beyond.

• Extended service hours, running from approximately 5 a.m. until after midnight.

• Numerous stations within the city for short-haul trips.

• Dedicated tracks alongside those used for other passenger and freight trains.

• New line segments in tunnels or on the surface to strategically improve routings.

• Grade crossing removal to eliminate conflicts with road traffic.

• Electrification for rapid acceleration, elimination of fumes and cost-effectiveness.

• High-capacity electric multiple unit rolling stock.

• Integration with other city transit routes through a common fare system and connecting stations.

The Berlin S-Bahn became what has been described as a surface subway. This successful template has been applied in 14 other German urban regions, numerous cities throughout Europe and as far afield as Hong Kong and Sydney. The latest is London’s Overground, launched in 2007. Others will open in Brussels and Denver in 2016, followed by San Francisco.

Like these cities, Toronto possesses the rail corridors — many now owned by GO — to create an urban railway cheaper and faster than is possible with subways. It would mesh snugly with any new TTC lines that may get built, making direct connections with these and existing subway, streetcar and bus routes. Furthermore, its construction won’t snarl up great swaths of the city because the rail corridors are independent of the street grid.

Ontario’s regional transportation agency, Metrolinx, fleetingly endorsed an urban rail concept in its 2008 master plan, The Big Move. It called for “express rail” on GO’s Oshawa-Hamilton line and from Union Station to Brampton, Mississauga, Richmond Hill and Markham, to be built on a leisurely schedule of 25 years or more.

A Metrolinx study team has recently gone even further in response to a looming capacity problem. Population growth and increased travel demand will drive GO rail ridership to a level that will overwhelm Union Station within 20 years. Inspired by the urban railways of Madrid, Melbourne and São Paulo, Metrolinx has contemplated an electrified east-west GO tunnel somewhere between the existing rail corridor and Queen Street through the heart of downtown.

Vision such as this isn’t new in Toronto. In 1986, GO proposed expanding and realigning portions of GO’s Georgetown and Richmond Hill lines to provide high-frequency service from Malton to Union Station and up through Leaside and Don Mills to Thornhill.

The success of urban railways from Munich to Melbourne is proof of the tax dollars to be saved and the dividends to be reaped. Now’s the time for the creation of an electrified Toronto rail express — T-REX, to give it a brand name. Delay will only condemn Toronto to more gridlock, higher costs, lost productivity and increased car-fuelled environmental degradation.

Greg Gormick is author of the report No Little Plan: Electrifying GO Transit, commissioned by Transport Action, the Clean Train Coalition and the Canadian Auto Workers.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The CN and CP freight line are not impacted very much by the plan. Some corridors are already sold to go train, and at CN corridor of York Subdivision, CP corridor of North Toronto Subdivision and CP corridor of Mactier Subdivision, new tracks will be built at the side of CN and CP mainline. The only route need totally sacrificed is CP Down Branch. The CN and CP freight train can pass by Toronto as before, just they cannot reach Union Station by CP Down Branch.

I just found the CP Don Branch was already sold to Ontario for go service in 2009

at http://www.trainweb....nto/LEASIDE.htm

The last paragraph in “ Don Branch” section :

The closing of Parkdale Yard reduced the importance of the Don Branch. The last train was 405 (old 965) March 4, 1986. It continued being used by the Circle yard job out of Toronto Yard to the Ash Bay area until finally in 2007 servicing of the very few remaining customers was handled by CN. It was reopened in December 2007 for one movement, the Holiday (Christmas) Train. Finally, it was sold April 2009 to Ontario for future GO train service.

It means the major conflict with freight service of GTA Grid ,which I used to worry about ,had been removed.

The east section of Down Town Express Loop will be in CP Don Branch ( see slide 10 and slides 58 to 69 for detail).

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It means the major conflict with freight service of GTA Grid ,which I used to worry about ,had been removed.

The east section of Down Town Express Loop will be in CP Don Branch ( see slide 10 and slides 58 to 69 for detail).

How do you figure? You still need to get access to the CP mainline.

Dan

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How do you figure? You still need to get access to the CP mainline.

Dan

The GTA Express Grid is a rail network of full separated routes; trains will not access any freight mainline.

There are three sections in the Grid will be built along CP rail corridors (see slide 10). Except for the section at Don Branch, the Grid will build new tracks separated with freight tracks along the corridors:

In GTA Express Loop:

North part of West section: From Lawrence West to the north of Steeles West in CP corridor of Mactier Subdivision.

12.5 km new 2 tracks line will be built in CP Mactier Subdivision. (See slide 46 to 50).

Using the corridor for commuter rail has been studied in Metrolink Bolton Commuter Rail Service Feasibility Study, and CP gave a track and corridor analysis report for commuter rail in 1990’s.

In Down Town Express Loop:

North Section: From Leaside to Dundas St West in CP corridor of North Toronto .

2 new tracks will be built in this section. (See slide 64 to 70).

Metrolinx planed a regional cross rail at the corridor in Big Move plan ( see slide 25 to 27), so a similar corridor study and cooperation with CP should be done or in the process.

East Section: From U Express to Leaside in CP Don Branch.

It belongs to Ontario Province from 2009. This corridor will be only used for commuter rail, 6 km new track will be built (see slide 61 to 63) for GTA Express Grid. The connection between Don Branch section and DTE north section will be new tracks separated with CP mainline.

Thank you.

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The connection between Don Branch section and DTE north section will be new tracks separated with CP mainline.

So how do you plan to get from the Don branch on the south side of the CP mainline to the former CN Leaside Branch on the north side of the CP mainline without interfering with the Leaside Trestle, Leaside Yard, the Eglinton and Millwood underpasses, and the Wicksteed grade crossing?

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