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CTrain - U2 cars Retirement Watch

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It would be a good idea to begin a thread for the U2s retirement.

So far cars 2010, 2019, 2027 Have been retired.

As we may know parts from cars 2019 and 2027 were used to build car 2090 and also parts from those cars were used to repair car 2050 that was parked on the tail track at anderson for a few years. Now car 2057 sits on the tail track with a badly damaged cab and possibly frame, that car hit a backhoe at 3rd street during station construction a few years back.

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Now car 2057 sits on the tail track with a badly damaged cab and possibly frame, that car hit a backhoe at 3rd street during station construction a few years back.

Is that the car under the tarp at the north Anderson tailtrack?

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Is that the car under the tarp at the north Anderson tailtrack?

Yes sir, It may still be repaired but who knows, they could use a new cab to repair it. I belive they have an ETS spec cab (no clearance lights next to destination sign) above the diesel shop at AG

I also re-post this good read as it adds relevance to this thread.

LRV_Fleet_Plan.pdf

LRV_Fleet_Plan.pdf

LRV_Fleet_Plan.pdf

LRV_Fleet_Plan.pdf

LRV_Fleet_Plan.pdf

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I wonder where U2 AC units 2101 and 2102 will fit on the retirement schedule?

I would suspect they will be around until about half way through the U2 retirements as they were some of the most recent U2's refurbished from what I recall. But they do not have the ramps installed like many of the U2 refurbishments did receive. Someone please correct me if I am wrong though.

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http://www.calgaryhe...4023/story.html

CALGARY - Calgary’s overworked and ancient LRT fleet is getting a much-needed tune-up as Calgary Transit rejigs and rethinks the way its mechanical crews deal with the vehicles, especially the most breakdown-prone ones.

The city’s Siemens U2 light rail cars date back as far as the system’s 1981 inception.

Last year, at the same time as the city prepared new orders to replace the oldest vehicles, it was beset with a string of rush-hour system shutdowns that focused public frustration on service reliability and prompted Mayor Naheed Nenshi to admit: “We have to do a better job.”

A recently released transit report details the city’s $500,000, three-year commitment to squeezing more life and fewer bungles out of the fleet.

The city will hire three new electromechanics and an additional technician to lead maintenance reviews.

But perhaps more importantly is the way the city rethinks how it does its repair work: moving extra staff to night and afternoon shifts to prepare as many cars as possible to handle peak service, and a new strategy to continually root out the “weakest” car in the LRT system and give it a full rehab.

“We’re going to rip that guts apart from the frame,” said transit fleet manager Russell Davies. “We’re going to look at exactly what’s going wrong with it over the last three years and we’re going to make sure that never happens again.”

Traditionally, mechanics would only fix up problems as they emerged on doors, wheels or other failing parts, instead of doing a full autopsy of the LRT vehicles, he said.

Last year, some attempts to do a better job of repairing the old fleet did improve reliability somewhat over 2010s performance.

However, the boxy, fibreglass U2 cars break down twice as often as the sleeker, steel-body Siemens SD160s, which were introduced to the fleet barely a decade ago.

Calgary is considering different train manufacturers for its next order of 50 LRT vehicles, which will help usher in four-car service and allow some of the oldest trains to hit the scrapyard.

But the delivery of those trains is pegged for 2014, so all the 82 U2s still in use will keep wheezing into service.

Davies’ goal is modest: a 10 per cent improvement in reliability rates in two years. That would bring the failure rate down below a dozen car failures per month, the manager said.

“It may not sound like a lot,” Davies said of his new program’s aim. “But there’s an awful lot of work that needs to get done, and you have to do it across the whole fleet.”

Those new electromechanics will take a year to train, he noted.

Ald. Ray Jones said a renewed maintenance plan is “probably long overdue,” but noted the public understands breakdowns will happen.

“You’ve got to give the department credit for not just the LRTs but buses, for stretching the lives of these cars as long as they have,” the northeast alderman said.

Transit is also commissioning a pair of third-party reviews of its maintenance program.

One general review will recommend key actions needed to improve the maintenance system. The other will tap a North American transit association to compare Calgary’s system to those in other North American cities and suggest best practices.

Davies said he believes Calgary’s service reliability ranks well against other cities’ systems. But it’s tricky to compare Calgary’s fleet to others in North America, because the C-Train has higher ridership than any other light rail service in Canada or the United States.

jmarkusoff@calgaryherald.comLRT car reliability:

Siemens U2s

Fleet: 82 cars

Average age: 25 years

Oldest cars: 31 years

Failures: every 43,463 km (median)

Siemens SD160s

Fleet: 110 cars

Average age: 7 years

Oldest cars: 11 years

Failures: 89,137 km (median)

© Copyright © The Calgary Herald

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Sure gonna miss those U2s, with their mechanical doors and tri-stand open-door button thingys. However, been on the Edmonton U2s, and I like their brown seating better! And the neat little design of the interior.

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Re New maintenance procedures for U2's:

Guess things have really changes since I last vistied Anderson in the mid 90's. I always thought they were up to par with the maintenance of all the C-Trains. I recall an electromechanic telling me how each unit goes through a full inspection on a preventative maintenance cycle, regardless if there were issues or not. Do the U2's have failures everyday which delay the system? And this question for LRT or any other CT employee, do you feel this new maintenance endeavour by CT is justified, should the problem cars be scrapped immediately or sent out to a contractor (Bombardier) for a complete rebuild. I am just trying to get the viewpoint of CT staff on this. Thanks.

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Car 2057 still at Anderson split in 2 waiting for disposal. Not much is left of this thing. One of the electros mentioned that none of the scrap yards want the thing.

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Car 2057 still at Anderson split in 2 waiting for disposal. Not much is left of this thing. One of the electros mentioned that none of the scrap yards want the thing.

Any reasons as to why? Surely, there's value in several tons of steel...

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Car 2057 still at Anderson split in 2 waiting for disposal. Not much is left of this thing. One of the electros mentioned that none of the scrap yards want the thing.

I find that odd as car 2010 was sent to Navajo several years ago and was destroyed there at the time.

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I too find it odd that no one wants it, it is after all just scrap metal.

they would want just the steel not the fiberglass exterior.

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I too find it odd that no one wants it, it is after all just scrap metal.

No seats, triangular "push to open" signs or even a door or two left? Wish I could buy it, would make a nice tourist stand :P

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No seats, triangular "push to open" signs or even a door or two left? Wish I could buy it, would make a nice tourist stand :P

Why? It was involved in an accident and therefore smashed up.

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Got word from a friend about an hour ago that half of 2057 was on a flatbed trailer at AG. Now, apparently it's either gone, or inside the building. So keep an eye out at the Navajo Wreckers off Deerfoot Trail and Calgary Metals on Ogden Road. #2010 showed up at Navajo years ago after it's wreck. However, I am not sure if that's where 2057 is even headed either. It could be headed to some out of city scrapyard.

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Got word from a friend about an hour ago that half of 2057 was on a flatbed trailer at AG. Now, apparently it's either gone, or inside the building. So keep an eye out at the Navajo Wreckers off Deerfoot Trail and Calgary Metals on Ogden Road. #2010 showed up at Navajo years ago after it's wreck. However, I am not sure if that's where 2057 is even headed either. It could be headed to some out of city scrapyard.

I wonder if it was the damaged end? I seen one half in the same spot yesterday, its been sitting there for months.

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2057 good end is at Calgary Metals according to maintenence.

Also, 2057 was supose to be repaired! All it needed was a new cab (in stock) The repair was supose too take a few weeks (depending on man power and other priority repairs) Also, 2057 was one of the best U2 cars as far a corrosion and reliability is concerned. The damaged end has no corrosion what so ever. The car was parted out because of funding for new cars in the future. It's parts will live on for the remaining fleet.

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