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TTC Application Process


ericgu22
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You need to find a different hobby once you get hired.

Wrong answer.

if i was to work for any TA, the last thing id want to do is transit fan on my days off, id probally take up another hobby,

I know of many TTC ops & staff that are still transit fans & fan on the TTC, it sounds sick in a way, but I know that if I ever get my dream fulfilled, I'd still be transit fanning.

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Just finished my interview...is it a good sign it lasted 1 hr 45mins?

So, lets see, you arrived on time (if you did) to the HR dept. HR secretary said "please sit down and wait". Then one of the HR staffer came and see you with bunch of questions and experience!

Something tells me you've spend over an hour face to face + waiting before you came next! Did you asked too many questions to the HR?

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Wow way to insult guys like grapejuice. If it weren't for inside guys who were fans much of the inside info on this site wouldn't exist.

Doesn't make sense.

step 1: be a transit fan have fun.

step 2: make a career out of it.

step 3: drop the hobby.

I know of many TTC ops & staff that are still transit fans & fan on the TTC, it sounds sick in a way, but I know that if I ever get my dream fulfilled, I'd still be transit fanning.

What's sick about it?

What's the difference between fanning without a transit job and fanning with a transit job? Sounds like some fans are succombing to popular opinion. :angry:

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Wow way to insult guys like grapejuice. If it weren't for inside guys who were fans much of the inside info on this site wouldn't exist.

Doesn't make sense.

step 1: be a transit fan have fun.

step 2: make a career out of it.

step 3: drop the hobby.

What's sick about it?

What's the difference between fanning without a transit job and fanning with a transit job? Sounds like some fans are succombing to popular opinion. :angry:

Yep.

In comparison, If you enjoy video games and become a video game designer... are you supposed to stop enjoying them? Of course not...

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You guys completely missed the point, by like 2 miles.

Don't drop the hobby, just don't advertise it so rabidly while on the clock.

Obviously me being here shows that I haven't left the hobby, and by now all of you are aware of what I do for a living.

Working at McDonald's doesn't preclude you from eating burgers, but you might not eat them as often.

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I did make my interviewers laugh so maybe ill get in :)

Making your interviewers laught doesn't not mean you have a higher chance of getting in. Also the length of the interview doesn't dictate whether you can get the job or not. You can talk a bunch of BS during the interview. The most important about the interview is to provide the answers the interviewers are looking for.

BTW, I was told TTC puts more emphasis on customer service rather than driving experiences. I remember an operator once said, "You can teach an idiot how to drive but you can't teach customer service to a person"

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Hey did you guys have to do the aptittude test? If so, what are your thoughts on it! I have no idea how I did. It's driving me nuts. There were alot of people there that didn't even speak english fluently. So I'm guessing there weren't too many people who did well. I would appreciate any thoughts. Thank you.

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I feel the need to weigh in on a couple of things that have been said in this thread...

I don't have a life so the job won't affect me much....

This is something that I feel helped me when I began driving a bus for a living. Mind you, being a charter bus driver is an entirely different beast than transit, and not having a life means you can work more hours, hours that you sometimes need desperately just to make ends meet when it's slow. Sometimes for me that meant working from 6:30 am to 1:00 am the following morning, a couple of times a week. Between finding time to sleep and eat in between, there was no time for me to have a life except when I had two or three days off at a time, which I never knew about until the day before, making it hard to plan to do fun things with my friends. Now, with transit if you have fixed days off you are probably well advised to do things during those days off that don't have to do with transit - this is not meant as a slight to the transit employees that are into the hobby such that they are avid posters on this board, but it has been the experience of several of my transit employees friends in Vancouver that "the job tends to mellow you out" (those are the words of a 14 year transit veteran in Vancouver, a fan who is not on this board). I felt this happen to me in a milder sense when I first starting working in the bus industry five years ago, although I spent several years in non-driving capacities, the effect was similar to what my friend described. The following advice from "Turtle" is probably intended more as a friendly attempt to help you preserve your sanity, as opposed to an insult to the employee/enthusiasts on the board:

You need to find a different hobby once you get hired.

Here's my logic. Member "Enviro 500" can attest to the same thing - once you start driving a bus for a living (or even working in the industry in a non-driving capacity, as I did for several years), I guarantee you that no matter how much of a transit enthusiast you are, the time will come when, as soon as you clock out at the end of your shift, you won't want to see another bus, streetcar, subway, highway coach, or whatever, until your next shift. That isn't to say that you hate your job, it's more to say that too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. There is something to be said for being a well rounded individual. Again, I am not saying there is anything wrong with not having a life (having been there myself), but when you first start, you don't yet have the experience to be able to fully understand just how your life is going to reshape itself. Take your sleeping patterns for example. You can't afford to skimp on sleep when the lives of your passengers the following day will depend on you being awake and alert on the job. When I was a ticket agent I could get away with cutting down on sleep. Heck, half the time I could just micro-sleep at the counter, especially in the summer when my company wasn't as busy. As a bus driver, though, trying to drive tired isn't only dangerous, it just doesn't feel good. Some of your life patterns will change naturally once you start the job, others you will have to actively change by yourself. Take advantage of your days off, is probably the best way to say it.

Wow way to insult guys like grapejuice. If it weren't for inside guys who were fans much of the inside info on this site wouldn't exist.

Doesn't make sense.

step 1: be a transit fan have fun.

step 2: make a career out of it.

step 3: drop the hobby.

What's sick about it?

What's the difference between fanning without a transit job and fanning with a transit job? Sounds like some fans are succombing to popular opinion. :angry:

Sadly, this is what has happened to some of the employees I know in Vancouver, for the reasons I mentioned above. I remember a guy who used to post fleet overhaul sightings on a very regular basis, who simply drifted away and got tired of doing stuff like that. Mind you, I have a feeling he didn't really like the job as much as some of his fellow transit fans, because he bounced around between being a driver, being a supervisor and working in transit control before eventually leaving to work in the control room for the Canada Line when it opened in 2009. I don't think anybody on here is actively trying to promote giving up the hobby once you break into the industry, but simply pointing out that it happens, sometimes whether you want it to or not. That isn't "succumbing to popular opinion".

You guys completely missed the point, by like 2 miles.

Don't drop the hobby, just don't advertise it so rabidly while on the clock.

This is a piece of advice that is well taken until such time as you mellow out naturally, as I mentioned above. Then you won't even have to think about it. It's your job, you'll love it if it's the right thing for you, just be careful whatever you do at least until such time as your probation is up!

I did make my interviewers laugh so maybe ill get in :)

Might not make it more likely that you will get the job, but certainly not necessarily a bad thing either - it can show you're human and that you have a sense of humour, which can pay dividends when you're actually out there dealing with the stresses of the road, traffic and dumb people.

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this is getting of topic, but its kinda like how some I.T guys sometimes have a mac at home, because lets face it when your job deals with fixing windows based PCs all day you probally dont want to have to deal with a PC (windows based, since macs are PCs technically now, they can run windows if you want to) in your off hours

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