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Instructors that have an abnormally high failure rate are often moved off of new hire training, it's not unheard of but it is unusual. If you end up with a trainer that you don't get along with that's your problem, if you want the job you're going to have to figure out how to cope.

That in itself is almost like the first test in how you deal with people. Afterall you are applying to be a Bus Operator...

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Hi guys, I just get assigned to Wilson Division as a bus driver. The training will start on Oct 22. I heard someone told me the training is hard. I am kind of nervous right now. Can someone please tell me what we will be trained in the training and what are the instructors looking for during the training? Thank you very much!

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Instructors that have an abnormally high failure rate are often moved off of new hire training, it's not unheard of but it is unusual. If you end up with a trainer that you don't get along with that's your problem, if you want the job you're going to have to figure out how to cope.

Two instructors I know have a 40% failure rate while some others almost everyone passes. A couple other instructors are ex-police/military and there approach to training is in your face (almost but not) confrontational. I found the training quite easy, my only stress was the fact that I was leaving a decent job for an opportunity that might not work out while knowing the bills still had to get paid. Also you only get paid 6 hours per day for the training which is good I guess because other places you don't get paid for training while having to pay for the driving course itself but like I said it was also difficult financially because you are not at full hourly rate. Overall it was a good experience due to the fact that my instructors were amazing while others who didn't get good instructors had a somewhat negative experience.

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Two instructors I know have a 40% failure rate while some others almost everyone passes. A couple other instructors are ex-police/military and there approach to training is in your face (almost but not) confrontational. I found the training quite easy, my only stress was the fact that I was leaving a decent job for an opportunity that might not work out while knowing the bills still had to get paid. Also you only get paid 6 hours per day for the training which is good I guess because other places you don't get paid for training while having to pay for the driving course itself but like I said it was also difficult financially because you are not at full hourly rate. Overall it was a good experience due to the fact that my instructors were amazing while others who didn't get good instructors had a somewhat negative experience.

Okay, so please show me where you get this 40% and almost 100% from? A link, a scan of the report or whatever it is you get this from.
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Hi guys, I just get assigned to Wilson Division as a bus driver. The training will start on Oct 22. I heard someone told me the training is hard. I am kind of nervous right now. Can someone please tell me what we will be trained in the training and what are the instructors looking for during the training? Thank you very much!

The training is hard. Two unsats and yer gone. So show up on time every day, be happy, and don't hit anything. By "on time" I would recommend aiming for 1/2 hour early.

Bring a pen and a notebook to write in.

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Training being hard or easy is mostly up to you. (using bus as an example) If you have a natural aptitude to certain things, particularly mechanical things, then as long as you do the homework you should do fine. There will be challenges, of course, for me the challenge has always been remember specific numbers like max air pressure, cut-in cut-out and that sort of stuff. The process of testing it all was a breeze, but remember the specific numbers from one check to another was what I had to concentrate my efforts on. Also if you have a good sense of spacial orientation then adapting to how a 40' bus maneuvers and how you have to set up where the front travels to cause the rear to follow where you need it to shouldn't be too difficult. Then of course there are the non-driving aspects like fare media, transfers, legal issues. Much of the training deals with what to do or not to do as a result of a legal issue in the past. All that said I guess what I'm trying to say is some find it extremely challenging, while others will find it relatively straight forward. Pile on top of that the character differences mentioned before from instructor to instructor and like I said it's a VERY dynamic situation.

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Training being hard or easy is mostly up to you. (using bus as an example) If you have a natural aptitude to certain things, particularly mechanical things, then as long as you do the homework you should do fine. There will be challenges, of course, for me the challenge has always been remember specific numbers like max air pressure, cut-in cut-out and that sort of stuff. The process of testing it all was a breeze, but remember the specific numbers from one check to another was what I had to concentrate my efforts on. Also if you have a good sense of spacial orientation then adapting to how a 40' bus maneuvers and how you have to set up where the front travels to cause the rear to follow where you need it to shouldn't be too difficult. Then of course there are the non-driving aspects like fare media, transfers, legal issues. Much of the training deals with what to do or not to do as a result of a legal issue in the past. All that said I guess what I'm trying to say is some find it extremely challenging, while others will find it relatively straight forward. Pile on top of that the character differences mentioned before from instructor to instructor and like I said it's a VERY dynamic situation.

Look, i know some of you feel the need to seem to be helpful, but giving out this kind of information just because someone asks for it, is both unfair and an advantage to those on this board as opposed to applicants who don't happen to be members here. So let's just keep the playing field level OK? They will find out soon enough what the training is and what is expected of them and deal with it from there, and personally that is how it should be and how I would prefer it to be.
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Look, i know some of you feel the need to seem to be helpful, but giving out this kind of information just because someone asks for it, is both unfair and an advantage to those on this board as opposed to applicants who don't happen to be members here. So let's just keep the playing field level OK? They will find out soon enough what the training is and what is expected of them and deal with it from there, and personally that is how it should be and how I would prefer it to be.

:huh:
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Look, i know some of you feel the need to seem to be helpful, but giving out this kind of information just because someone asks for it, is both unfair and an advantage to those on this board as opposed to applicants who don't happen to be members here. So let's just keep the playing field level OK? They will find out soon enough what the training is and what is expected of them and deal with it from there, and personally that is how it should be and how I would prefer it to be.

There was nothing wrong with what Grapejuice said, you can also get that same info or in a B/C Licence hand book, or if you are going for a B/CZ licence at a school. The only thing the book won't tell you is TTCs spec for cut-in and cut out, and other TTC focused info. Grapejuice was just simply sharing his experince. I don't think TTC expects anyone to treat it has if they are in some Secret Services.

If he gave the answers to certain things that know one should find out other than the people who are going through it, then I do understand your fustration.

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Look, i know some of you feel the need to seem to be helpful, but giving out this kind of information just because someone asks for it, is both unfair and an advantage to those on this board as opposed to applicants who don't happen to be members here. So let's just keep the playing field level OK? They will find out soon enough what the training is and what is expected of them and deal with it from there, and personally that is how it should be and how I would prefer it to be.

Would agree but this is a public discussion board that is open to anyone who wishes to join. The information provided isn't really going to give anyone much of a leg up over anyone else, it just serves to calm their nerves a little.

The way I look at it is, either you pass or you fail, if you pass you deserve the job. If you fail, maybe the job isn't for you and you failed because you don't meet the requirements, public safety is at stake and there are huge liabilities in this industry and the pay reflects that.

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Hi guys,

i have applied for transit operator job, received conf.. Email after 3 weeks on sep 21 but no answer for info.. Session yet, approximately what is current process, please reply :)

I believe a confirmation email is just to let you know and confirm that they have in fact received your resume and are/have reviewed it. It's just to let you know and have piece of mind that your application was not lost in the process of getting to them.

This does not mean they have considered you...yet.

An invitation to an information session should come through the post-mail. If they are not interested, you won't receive anything. Not sure if they email invitation to information sessions though?

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As far as I'm concerned those who got the job offer got the call within 24 hrs. After their interview. This is the information I would like to confirm with recent interviewees ...

It took them 4 days to call me back. Some in my training group were contacted within the same day. It is a variable circumstance depending on how busy they are in HR, and as of late they have been very busy.

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The training is hard. Two unsats and yer gone. So show up on time every day, be happy, and don't hit anything. By "on time" I would recommend aiming for 1/2 hour early.

Bring a pen and a notebook to write in.

Training being hard or easy is mostly up to you. (using bus as an example) If you have a natural aptitude to certain things, particularly mechanical things, then as long as you do the homework you should do fine. There will be challenges, of course, for me the challenge has always been remember specific numbers like max air pressure, cut-in cut-out and that sort of stuff. The process of testing it all was a breeze, but remember the specific numbers from one check to another was what I had to concentrate my efforts on. Also if you have a good sense of spacial orientation then adapting to how a 40' bus maneuvers and how you have to set up where the front travels to cause the rear to follow where you need it to shouldn't be too difficult. Then of course there are the non-driving aspects like fare media, transfers, legal issues. Much of the training deals with what to do or not to do as a result of a legal issue in the past. All that said I guess what I'm trying to say is some find it extremely challenging, while others will find it relatively straight forward. Pile on top of that the character differences mentioned before from instructor to instructor and like I said it's a VERY dynamic situation.

Training is training. It is neither easy nor hard; it all depends on the individual trainee. Having gone through the training recently for bus, I can say this: It's a long five weeks and it is well worth it because the training is really good. Personally, my stressors were the testing days - pass/fail (if you fail testing you are out, with no chance of reapplying as an operator for two years).

Keep an open mind, don't disagree with the instructor - regardless of the situation - cope with it.

Unsats - as mentioned you are limited to two, on your second one you are removed from training. With that said, it is difficult to get an unsat.

Common things that could and/or can result in an unsat for the day:

  • Violation of the Highway Traffic Act could get you an unsat depending on the situation (like running a red light or a stop sign).

     

  • Arriving late in the morning without notification.

     

  • Hitting a fixed object like sign or post.

     

  • Preventable collision with another vehicle.

     

  • etc...

     

Typically they are not concerned about curb rubs and mountings (unless you hit something) because you are in training. But on test day, curb rubs and mountings are worth demerits which could result in failure.

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I believe a confirmation email is just to let you know and confirm that they have in fact received your resume and are/have reviewed it. It's just to let you know and have piece of mind that your application was not lost in the process of getting to them.

This does not mean they have considered you...yet.

An invitation to an information session should come through the post-mail. If they are not interested, you won't receive anything. Not sure if they email invitation to information sessions though?

Thanks for reply, but is that ok to keep sending more resume untill I get selected for info.. Session.

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Thanks for reply, but is that ok to keep sending more resume untill I get selected for info.. Session.

No! Definitely not.

On their website, it specifically tells you not to send multiple resumes.

During the recruitment process, they make it known that they are only interested in those that can follow instructions. You might be digging your own grave if they notice your resume showing up multiple times in their office.

If, after six months or a year, they don't contact you after reviewing your resume, then that meant they weren't interested. Perhaps after that point, I'd suggest redoing your resume, have a career centre look at it and try resubmitting?

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No! Definitely not.

On their website, it specifically tells you not to send multiple resumes.

During the recruitment process, they make it known that they are only interested in those that can follow instructions. You might be digging your own grave if they notice your resume showing up multiple times in their office.

If, after six months or a year, they don't contact you after reviewing your resume, then that meant they weren't interested. Perhaps after that point, I'd suggest redoing your resume, have a career centre look at it and try resubmitting?

Thanks again, where I can find career centre which helps me making my résumé.

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