cleowin

TransLink Future - Dream's and Aspirations

1,002 posts in this topic

Oh, the trolleys are plenty capable of 80km/h. It's the wires that need to be upgraded, I'm pretty sure. And it's not like it can't be fixed, either. The old Hastings Express wires are apparently rated for 110km/h.

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I don't even think the wires need to be upgraded. What are the trolleys governed at ???

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The trolleys are more than capable of going 80km/h. The issue is the overhead, not all of it is designed for speeds higher than 50-60km/h. The trolleys are governed at 60km/h with most being able to get up to 65km/h. I dont drive trolleys anymore, but when I did, I could accelerate nicely to 60km/h and once I reached that, I could feel the "kick back" of the govenor. Felt like it could keep going.

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Ungoverned they can go VERY fast. I remember riding with Don when ETS got the first BBC. At that time it wasn't governed and if he wanted to he could blow the doors off anything on the road. ^_^

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Concept Rapid Transit Metro Map:

2040uc8.png

*Thanks to Ehlun for providing me the link to this map.*

Anyhow, any of this seem realistic?

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Anyhow, any of this seem realistic?

I do not believe that the concept of running Skytrain service up to SFU is a realistic expectation.

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Even if they built an underground tunnel and had escalators/elevators up to the surface?

After I saw the map you posted, I did some quick research and found out that the maximum grade a normal train can operate on (with a normal load) is about 4 percent, though it is worth noting that grades of any more than 2 percent are generally avoided. Consider this when reading the following excerpt from the Burnaby Mountain Gondola Transit Assessment below...

"Between Duthie Avenue and Gaglardi Way, the route has an overall elevation change of approximately 240 m and experiences grades of 6.5 to 7 percent over an approximate length of 2.2 km... [t]he second section, between Broadway and

Burnaby Mountain Parkway, is approximately 2.7 km long and has a continuous grade of approximately 7.5 percent" (10).

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Anyhow, any of this seem realistic?

I like how you put Rapid-bus and WCE service out to Langley, Abbotsford and Mission, yet put nothing out to Tsawwassen or Horseshoe Bay ferry terminals which would probably need rapid transit by the year 2040. :lol:

Also... what about the U.S Border? By the year 2040 there could be a union agreement between the USA and Canada that operates in a similar fashion to Europe where there is technically 'no' border. No waiting in line at the 49th parallel, a Rapid Bus running non-stop between Bellingham and White Rock... anything could happen.

Of course- knowing TransLink, yes this seems very realistic... maybe not exactly but a pretty good representation. I do like the idea of L.R.T down the Arbutus corridor and W41st Avenue.

By 2040 the Seabus will probably be obsolete... and BC Ferries for that matter as well. By then we could have teleportation portals that are set up for road traffic at each end of the water. It's hard to plan that far into the future because we don't know what technologies we'll have when 2040 eventually comes.

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Concept Rapid Transit Metro Map:

*Thanks to Ehlun for providing me the link to this map.*

Anyhow, any of this seem realistic?

The M-Line trip from Chancellor to Ambleside would take forever. Though if you include the SeaBus trip from Ambleside to Chancellor, you have a nice loop! XD

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After I saw the map you posted, I did some quick research and found out that the maximum grade a normal train can operate on (with a normal load) is about 4 percent, though it is worth noting that grades of any more than 2 percent are generally avoided. Consider this when reading the following excerpt from the Burnaby Mountain Gondola Transit Assessment below...

The maximum grade for the Bombardier LIM ALRT vehicle is 6.5%, but I believe this is only used on Expo Line. The maximum grade for new guideway constructions (Millennium and Evergreen) is 6%. The maximum grade for Canada Line guideway and vehicle is 5.5%. Maximum grade within a station for all lines is 0.5%.

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All those routes are just trying to do too much at once. There's a lot of combining of completely unrelated routes, as well as arbitrary SkyTrain service up to places where it might not necessarily be warranted. For example, the Expo Line extension out to 160th Avenue.... I can kind of see Guildford, but after Guildford Exchange, the 501 tends to empty out and it is no longer the primary route serving Walnut Grove... Carvolth Exchange, after the introduction of the 555. I see there's a lot of doubling back of routes, which sort of makes it look like as if you decided areas to connect out of a hat. This type of milk run service tends to be highly unpopular, as anyone who's ridden BC Transit small communities bus routes would know.

Of course, that's just me. I tend to think in straight lines.

I guess the gist of what I'm trying to say is, if 40-footers don't cut it, put in artics. If artics don't cut it then only then should you be thinking of SkyTrain. Certainly the 239 and 410 have very high ridership, and certainly during peak hours they warrant articulated buses. B-Line service, maybe, but I don't think SkyTrain service can be justified.

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Concept Rapid Transit Metro Map:

2040uc8.png

*Thanks to Ehlun for providing me the link to this map.*

Anyhow, any of this seem realistic?

The Millenium line is already long enough, taking maybe an hour to do a full trip, and Chancellor to Ambleside is not a good option cause the distance between both are long, and are almost double the distance of the current route, and that would mean taking about half an hour to do a trip. I think sticking to the current bus route is better.

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My dreams for TransLink:

555: 10 minute service and articulated buses.

509: A re-route from Carvolth Exchange to Surrey Central Station via 202 HOV entrence onto Highway 1 to 156 St exit service all day.

West Coast express one hour service on weekend Mid-day only.

More hybrid buses.

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More hybrid buses.

I doubt more hybrid buses are on the docket given the hilly terrain of Metro Vancouver.

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I'd be willing to place money that the next bus order for Translink will be CNG. The provincial government has REALLY been pushing natural gas the past few months

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Again... I should pass on the idea that Vancouver be TransLink's first "majority-green" facility using solely trolleybuses and CNG buses. =)

Only problem though, of course, might be the cost of a new CNG fuel island...

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Send all the Novas to Surrey/Richmond/North Van and replace them with something from New Flyer. XD(E)40s perhaps.

I think XDE40 should go to Surrey and Vancouver; put the Novas in Richmond and North Vancouver.

Expand the electric trolley system to go further into Burnaby.

I think this would be perfect for some routes in Burnaby but TransLink would need to buy more trolley buses.

I think 99 B-line should be converted to the use E60LFR buses because trolley lines follow the route 99 takes.

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I think 99 B-line should be converted to the use E60LFR buses because trolley lines follow the route 99 takes.

This would be fantastic, but if the 99 is going to remain express, then express wire would have to be installed.

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This would be fantastic, but if the 99 is going to remain express, then express wire would have to be installed.

That and about fifteen-twenty new XT60 Xcelsior trolleys perhaps? Sounds good to me!

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This would be fantastic, but if the 99 is going to remain express, then express wire would have to be installed.

Yes on location will there is a lot of trolley buses at one time.

That and about fifteen-twenty new XT60 Xcelsior trolleys perhaps? Sounds good to me!

Yep! Once the UBC rapid transit opens those buses could go on different routes and increase capacity.

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I'd rather see the money go towards a Broadway Subway towards UBC...

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I dream that Translink will buy toronto's (and maybe Detroit's) old MKI cars, but that will drive up maintenance costs.

we need to fill in 057-060 and 119-120.

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Why would we buy back the MKI's that are soon to be retired?

Besides, they have a lower capacity than the MKII's we have right now...

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Why would we buy back the MKI's that are soon to be retired?

Besides, they have a lower capacity than the MKII's we have right now...

Then I guess you haven't heard that TransLink is rebuilding the MKI's. All our trains have a designed service life of 50 years. TTC is retiring theirs because they'll convert the Scarborough line to LRT. As for Detroit... I have no idea,

- Bryan "Goggles"

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