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CTrain - S200 (series 9) cars

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3 hours ago, LRT said:

You're absolutely correct did anybody notice the missing panels on the front... again!

If we all had a dollar for every missing panel on an S200, we'd all be billionaires.

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Despite all the issues with these cars, there is one aspect to them I see a lot that I don't think gets talked about much, and that's accessibility.

Many times I have watched someone in a wheelchair or with some other mobility issue struggle to board a U2 or 160. If they happen to be in front of an accessible entrance, things are a little easier, but frequently the person hasn't aligned themselves to be in a position to get to a different door in a reasonable time, especially if the platform is snowy or slippery.

They then have a choice between trying to jam themselves in anyway or wait for another train. In the winter, the latter option isn't really a good one. So a lot of commotion can ensue.

With a 200 though, there's never a problem. Given that public transportation likely caters to a disproportionate number of people in this situation, I am very glad these trains exist and in that regard, am eager to see them make up a higher percentage of the fleet, for the dignity on my fellow citizens.

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25 minutes ago, chills_on_the_train said:

Despite all the issues with these cars, there is one aspect to them I see a lot that I don't think gets talked about much, and that's accessibility.

Many times I have watched someone in a wheelchair or with some other mobility issue struggle to board a U2 or 160. If they happen to be in front of an accessible entrance, things are a little easier, but frequently the person hasn't aligned themselves to be in a position to get to a different door in a reasonable time, especially if the platform is snowy or slippery.

They then have a choice between trying to jam themselves in anyway or wait for another train. In the winter, the latter option isn't really a good one. So a lot of commotion can ensue.

With a 200 though, there's never a problem. Given that public transportation likely caters to a disproportionate number of people in this situation, I am very glad these trains exist and in that regard, am eager to see them make up a higher percentage of the fleet, for the dignity on my fellow citizens.

I'm sure these will turn out to be good cars once all of the bugs are worked out.

The series 8's were bad at first, too. Now (from what I've seen, at least), they are good cars that work well with the rest of the system.

The only flaws I've seen are the uncomfortable seats and those low-hanging "next stop" signs.

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I guess this raises the question, then....

 

Why not build the platforms to meet the height of the door threshold, so that you don't need to have a ramp at certain doors? (Or conversely, why not construct the cars so that the door threshold is the same height as the edge of the platform?)

 

Dan

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37 minutes ago, smallspy said:

I guess this raises the question, then....

 

Why not build the platforms to meet the height of the door threshold, so that you don't need to have a ramp at certain doors? (Or conversely, why not construct the cars so that the door threshold is the same height as the edge of the platform?)

 

Dan

You can try to do that, but both platforms and the vehicles aren't solid, immovable objects. Platforms sink and rise with ground conditions, and vehicle heights change based on suspensions that are changing based on passenger loads and wear, tyre thickness, and even rail wear.  It's difficult to match every single platform edge with every vehicle you have, hence the adjustable ramp - it can be done (they're trying with the Calgary 9s), but it means a lot more money spent on track/ballast work more often.

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Transit has done a decent job matching up the platforms and the door. I was in Edmonton using their system recently and the step is quite significant significant compared to Calgary system.

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18 minutes ago, LRT said:

Transit has done a decent job matching up the platforms and the door. I was in Edmonton using their system recently and the step is quite significant significant compared to Calgary system.

As I'm sure you recall, they had to do a lot of ballast undercutting in the past few years at platforms to make sure those stations were at the right level....

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2 hours ago, CTrainDude said:

You can try to do that, but both platforms and the vehicles aren't solid, immovable objects. Platforms sink and rise with ground conditions, and vehicle heights change based on suspensions that are changing based on passenger loads and wear, tyre thickness, and even rail wear.  It's difficult to match every single platform edge with every vehicle you have, hence the adjustable ramp - it can be done (they're trying with the Calgary 9s), but it means a lot more money spent on track/ballast work more often.

Then why has it not been a problem to do that in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, to name but three locations just in Canada where they've managed to get everything more-or-less lined up?

 

Dan

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1 hour ago, smallspy said:

Then why has it not been a problem to do that in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, to name but three locations just in Canada where they've managed to get everything more-or-less lined up?

 

Dan

I'm not sure there's a lot of frost heaving or mud ties underground in Montreal or Toronto, or above ground in Vancouver.

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1 hour ago, smallspy said:

Then why has it not been a problem to do that in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, to name but three locations just in Canada where they've managed to get everything more-or-less lined up?

 

Dan

 

15 minutes ago, CTrainDude said:

I'm not sure there's a lot of frost heaving or mud ties underground in Montreal or Toronto, or above ground in Vancouver.

Wouldn’t the simplier answer be the fact that those properties use direct fixation at many, if not most or all of their stations, as opposed to Calgary where we only have a handful and the core?

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6 minutes ago, Gsgeek540 said:

 

Wouldn’t the simplier answer be the fact that those properties use direct fixation at many, if not most or all of their stations, as opposed to Calgary where we only have a handful and the core?

Thank you I was just going to mention that. 

Westleg uses direct fixation at most station locations.

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2 hours ago, LRT said:

Thank you I was just going to mention that. 

Westleg uses direct fixation at most station locations.

I wouldn't say 'most', but definitely half (69, Westbrook, Sunalta - the grade separated ones).  It's more likely you've got DF underground or above ground because you're building the concrete infrastructure anyway.  That's definitely a major factor.

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36 minutes ago, CTrainDude said:

I wouldn't say 'most', but definitely half (69, Westbrook, Sunalta - the grade separated ones).  It's more likely you've got DF underground or above ground because you're building the concrete infrastructure anyway.  That's definitely a major factor.

Actually the only ones that don't are Sirocco and Shaganappi Point

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18 hours ago, CTrainDude said:

I'm not sure there's a lot of frost heaving or mud ties underground in Montreal or Toronto, or above ground in Vancouver.

 

18 hours ago, Gsgeek540 said:

 

Wouldn’t the simplier answer be the fact that those properties use direct fixation at many, if not most or all of their stations, as opposed to Calgary where we only have a handful and the core?

Not in Montreal or Vancouver, but there are a number of stations that use ties-in-ballast at outdoor stations rather than direct fixation in Toronto - both on the subway and the UPX. And again, by-and-large there have been no ongoing and long-term issues with lining up the floor level of the equipment with the platforms.

 

As for "not as much heaving".....the weather in Toronto may be more moderate than that in Calgary because of the lake, but that doesn't mean that frost and freezing cycles don't happen here. It happens plenty.

 

Dan

 

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Here is 2446. Doesn't even look like it's anywhere near ready for revenue service.

Probably being used as a parts car...

20190201_134359.jpg

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On Feb 1 I was in town, and got a few shots of the S200s.

ct2444.jpg

ct2450.jpg

ct2414.jpg

ct2414a.jpg

2459 was running as a single car when I saw it at Brentwood that afternoon:

ct2459.jpg

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5 hours ago, A. Wong said:

2459 was running as a single car when I saw it at Brentwood that afternoon:

ct2459.jpg

It was most likely used for training purposes as there are ongoing classes right now.  2459 is in a 3-car rush hour extra consist this morning. 

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