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A. Wong

Southeast LRT

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Why did ETS choose to use low floor Light rail vehicles and not high floor light rail vehicles for this line? When does ETS hope to start building the Mill Woods to City Centre LRT line?

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Why did ETS choose to use low floor Light rail vehicles and not high floor light rail vehicles for this line? When does ETS hope to start building the Mill Woods to City Centre LRT line?

Cheaper costs (building and maintenance), plus access for wheelchairs and the disabled. I used to say the EXACT same thing when discussing plans for the LRT in Winnipeg and got shut down fast. :P

As for building it, that I'd have no idea. Gonna take Martins post and start doing some Googling.

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Cheaper costs (building and maintenance), plus access for wheelchairs and the disabled.

Because obviously the current system doesn't have access for wheelchairs and the disabled :P

No the real reasoning is a bunch of salesman from Ireland came in and sold them on the idea. Being ETS, there were a few public "consultation" meetings which explained how they were arbitrarily going with this system whether anyone likes it or not. Mayor Mandel's aversion to sticking with the original plans for West LRT (87th ave via University... couldn't do that as it would run right through the backyards of all of his rich voting clientele who obviously don't use transit) provided additional justification; this is easier to shoehorn into Stony Plain Road than conventional LRT.

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When Edmonton chose high-floor light rail, way back in 1974, low floor light rail didn't exist and since they were already branching into the [North American] unknown by choosing light rail, I don't think their innovative risk-taking can be over-estimated. The only rapid transit examples in North America to draw on were heavy rail. As a result Edmonton's light rail has several heavy rail characteristics (high platforms, subway tunnel, mezzanine levels in stations, no street-running, and off-board fare collection, to name a few).

Fast forward four decades, and there are light rail systems in operation or under construction all over North America. Within a decade or two of Edmonton opening the typical design standard is now low-floor, with low-level platforms. So for Edmonton (and Calgary) the question is whether or not to carry forward with what is now a cumbersome design (stations are bigger and more expensive, cars are not as off-the-shelf) because it integrates with what exists, or to develop a more standard second design and live without interoperability.

London did it, changing train profiles between large- and small-bore tubes. New York too, with different widths for IRT and IND-BMT trains. Toronto chose standard gauge for "Transit City" instead of the Toronto-gauge of the existing streetcar network. I understand Calgary is leaning towards low-floor for the Centre Street and/or Southeast line(s).

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With the gong show of Bomardier`s heavily delayed delivery of Flexcity cars to TTC is there any chance of ETS being negatively effected with implementation of this line? Seems like the Toronto order is late to such a point that the "in service" date of 2020 may become the initial receiving timeline of cars? I hope this is not the case and Bombardier steps it up.

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It's in the consortiums best interest for Bombardier to complete on time. Apparently the consortium can replace Bombardier (or anyone else) if they fail to meet expectations.

I don't know how that would play out given lead times for LRV's, but, I guess Bombardier can't get their act together in the next year or so, I suspect there could be enough time to bring someone else on board.

Anyways, I think the real measure is not the TTC deliveries but Bombardier deliveries for other new projects, like Waterloo and Metrolinx LRT projects in Toronto.

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On 6/10/2016 at 10:01 PM, M. Parsons said:

It's in the consortiums best interest for Bombardier to complete on time. Apparently the consortium can replace Bombardier (or anyone else) if they fail to meet expectations.

I don't know how that would play out given lead times for LRV's, but, I guess Bombardier can't get their act together in the next year or so, I suspect there could be enough time to bring someone else on board.

Anyways, I think the real measure is not the TTC deliveries but Bombardier deliveries for other new projects, like Waterloo and Metrolinx LRT projects in Toronto.

I mean, it's been a year and a half and only one has been delivered

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It's been more like 6 months and it's sitting inside a tent at the Gerry Wright facility. There is literally no where to put any new cars yet. 

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5 hours ago, M. Parsons said:

It's been more like 6 months and it's sitting inside a tent at the Gerry Wright facility. There is literally no where to put any new cars yet. 

I meant a year and a half since the qouted comment was posted. When will the new carbarns be built?

Edited by Jaymaud0804
Fat fingers

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10 hours ago, Jaymaud0804 said:

I meant a year and a half since the qouted comment was posted. When will the new carbarns be built?

They are already partially built. You can see this page for some photos from October 2018: http://transedlrt.ca/gallery/omf-progress-photos/

These photos are from April 2018: http://transedlrt.ca/gallery/area-7-gerry-wright-omf/

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