Nabinut

Portland TriMet

488 posts in this topic

After the spectacular visit to Northern California, I wasn’t done just yet. Next stop for me was Portland, Oregon and its transit system, TriMet.

TriMet operates across three counties and the city of Portland with bus and MAX light rail service as well as contracted to run the Portland Streetcar line. TriMet’s biggest service area is the recently refurbished Downtown Transit Mall which buses & MAX trains share the street and skip stops along 5th & 6th Avenues. This area is also part of fareless square, once a free zone for all lines, now only for MAX service.

The current bus fleet consists mostly of New Flyers built between 1997 to 2009 with Gillig Phantoms as far back as 1990 still plying the streets. Also in its fleet are two series of Flixble Metros, a batch from 1992 & another from 1994 that are in excellent condition for their age.

Beaverton Transit Center is the main hub for transit outside of Portland. Multiple bus lines and two MAX lines stop or terminate here. Among the bus lines is Route 78, the line I took to my hotel. For this ride is 1992 Flxible Metro C #1793:

WCT3681.jpg

The second series of Flxibles purchased by TriMet, the 1800s are similar to their sister series except for having a Cummins M11 instead of a L10. Here is #1835 assigned to Route 52:

WCT3680.jpg

Among the many New Flyers in TriMet’s fleet is #2646, seen at the edge of the Downtown Transit Mall near Portland State University. 2646 has been repainted into TriMet’s new scheme:

WCT3683.jpg

Gillig Phantom #1624, at the ripe old age of 20 is pictured at the Route 51 layover in the Downtown Transit Mall. 1624 is one of 43 30 foot Phantoms in operation for TriMet:

WCT3692.jpg

Clackamas Town Center is the terminus for the MAX Green Line and several bus routes. Here is #2301 & 2819 at the outbound stop of the town center:

WCT3703.jpg

To connect passengers with the Green Line, all buses end across from the stop, which happens to be a parking garage. Buses layover inside as shown by this photo:

WCT3701.jpg

Gillig Phantom #2113, one of 65 Gillig Phantoms purchased by TriMet in 1997 lays over at the Oregon City Transit Center:

WCT3704.jpg

Flxible Metro C #1703 squeezes between a car and another bus during afternoon rush hour at the Transit Mall. Groups of bus line serve a stop every two blocks along this stretch:

WCT3708.jpg

C-Tran, which provides service to nearby Vancouver, Washington operates several local and express lines into Downtown Portland. Here is #2249 along 6th Avenue on Route 134 express:

WCT3711.jpg

Sticking with C-Tran for a moment, the system’s newest buses are Gillig Advantage BRTs also numbered in the 2200s. 2276 skates past a MAX train on Route 105, which operates all day into Downtown Vancouver:

WCT3707.jpg

Leaving Downtown to ride the tram, I captured New Flyer #2643 leaving the OHSU campus with part of the Portland Skyline in the background:

WCT3716.jpg

Due to a portion of the Portland Streetcar being down, Gillig Phantom #1614 is assigned to provide service between the Aerial Tram and the nearest streetcar stop:

WCT3718.jpg

New Flyer D40LFR #2940, the last of 40 purchased by TriMet at the last westbound bus stop at the Portland Transit Mall. This series also ushered in the new paint scheme.:

WCT3722.jpg

Flxible Metro C #1774 at the Washington Square Mall on Route 62 at dusk. TriMet also observes the no engine idling policy while at layover:

WCT3723.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Videos:

TriMet New Flyer D40LF #2701: Cummins ISL/Voith D864.3 Transmission

TriMet Gillig Phantom #1636: Cummins L10/Voith D863.3 Transmission

TriMet New Flyer D40LF #2204: Cummins C8.3/ Voith D863.3 Transmission

TriMet Flxible Metro C #1744: Cummins L10/Voith D863.3 Transmission

TriMet Gillig Phantom #2110: Cummins M11/Voith D863.3 Transmission

TriMet New Flyer D40LF #2643 (Exterior):

TriMet Flxible Metro #1793 (Great Ride Video)

TriMet Gillig Phantom #1455 (20 years old and still kicking ass): Cummins L10/Voith D863.3

TriMet Gillig Phantom #1614 (Exterior):

TriMet New Flyer D40LFR #2922:

Awesome Flxible Startup courtesy of a tree branch:

Portland TriMet Bus System Video:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, they are all retired. Only the Gilligs remain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some shots of the Portland MAX service from my one day stop over:

Type 3 Car #320 at the Portland International Airport:

WCT3677.jpg

#317 at the Portland State University stop of the Green Line. It is also the last stop:

WCT3687.jpg

Car #236 in the old TriMet scheme also on the Green Line:

WCT3688.jpg

Type 4 car #410 heading outbound on 6th Avenue towards Clackamas Town Center:

WCT3710.jpg

Car #417 at another of the Portland Transit Mall’s MAX stations during rush hour:

WCT3713.jpg

A two car type 4 train on 5th Avenue covering the Green line near twilight:

WCT3720.jpg

Portland Streetcar:

Car #003 outside PSU near 5th Avenue where it crosses MAX tracks:

WCT3715.jpg

A tale of two cars. 002 is part of the first order between Skoda & Inekon, 010 is the third of four cars delivered built by Inekon and Ostrava City Transportation Company. Both are working a shorten streetcar service, where shuttle service was provided by Bus:

WCT3719.jpg

Videos:

Portland TriMet MAX service (mostly recorded at the Transit Mall:

Portland Streetcar #010:

Portland Aerial Tram: (Not exactly on rails but a service none the less)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just recently going through some TriMet documents and found an interesting piece of information - TriMet is switching from New Flyer to Gillig for its new bus procurement through 2015. It has been purchasing New Flyer buses exclusively since 1997 when it chose to stick with the low floor design (2000's, 2200's-2300's, 2500's, 2600's, 2700's, 2800's, and 2900's - 361 in all). I do know that TriMet was very unhappy with the latest batch of buses (2901-2940), so in some ways this move to Gillig makes some sense.

I am not sure if they will purchase BRT style buses, but they do have a Federal grant for 4 hybrid buses that will be used to further test hybrid technology. Next year, Portland is anticipating receiving 55 buses, with an additional 40 buses every year after that. It will be interesting to see the old Flxible buses get phased off the roads...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting indeed!! I suspect the 55 bus order should knock out the rest of the 1990 Gilligs and part of the 1992 Flxible order. Now I know I have to get back to Portland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting indeed!! I suspect the 55 bus order should knock out the rest of the 1990 Gilligs and part of the 1992 Flxible order. Now I know I have to get back to Portland.

The Flxibles will probally go first as they are more difficult to get parts for. Tri-Met has been retiring and cannibalizing flxibles for spare parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was just recently going through some TriMet documents and found an interesting piece of information - TriMet is switching from New Flyer to Gillig for its new bus procurement through 2015. It has been purchasing New Flyer buses exclusively since 1997 when it chose to stick with the low floor design (2000's, 2200's-2300's, 2500's, 2600's, 2700's, 2800's, and 2900's - 361 in all). I do know that TriMet was very unhappy with the latest batch of buses (2901-2940), so in some ways this move to Gillig makes some sense.

I am not sure if they will purchase BRT style buses, but they do have a Federal grant for 4 hybrid buses that will be used to further test hybrid technology. Next year, Portland is anticipating receiving 55 buses, with an additional 40 buses every year after that. It will be interesting to see the old Flxible buses get phased off the roads...

That's a really excellent get for Gillig! And this puts TriMet in line with most other TA's in Oregon (Rogue Valley Transportation District in Medford is a major exception, as it is staunchly CNG and uses mostly New Flyer C35LF's). As for the buses to be replaced, while they do need to replace the Flxible Metro's, they also have a number of 1990-91 Gillig Phantoms (including 43 30-footers). It should be interesting to see a baby Gillig LF in the latest TriMet livery.

By the way, what's the issue TriMet has with the 2900-series of D40LFR's? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
By the way, what's the issue TriMet has with the 2900-series of D40LFR's? Thanks!

It seems like they've worked out the vast majority of the problems with the 2900's, but when they first came in they went through 3 or 4 engines - I heard that they blew out on multiple buses and needed to be replaced entirely. I'm not 100% sure as to why, but that was the big reason TriMet really didn't like this last batch of buses. Drivers on the whole were not pleased with the sealed windows, though they really seemed to like the new electric power steering that the buses had.

In my opinion, I think the main reason they are switching manufacturers is because of the bad press last year when a bus ran over a bunch of pedestrians in a crosswalk. TriMet placed part of the blame on the design of the 2500-series D40LF bus that was involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sadly, they are all retired. Only the Gilligs remain

Hmm. I rode a 30' Metro in early October 2010 -- on a Saturday -- the route that runs through the park.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It seems like they've worked out the vast majority of the problems with the 2900's, but when they first came in they went through 3 or 4 engines - I heard that they blew out on multiple buses and needed to be replaced entirely. I'm not 100% sure as to why, but that was the big reason TriMet really didn't like this last batch of buses. Drivers on the whole were not pleased with the sealed windows, though they really seemed to like the new electric power steering that the buses had.

In my opinion, I think the main reason they are switching manufacturers is because of the bad press last year when a bus ran over a bunch of pedestrians in a crosswalk. TriMet placed part of the blame on the design of the 2500-series D40LF bus that was involved.

Blind spot perhaps that caused it? Keep in mind that NFI, you see more in the shops than on the road!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blind spot perhaps that caused it? Keep in mind that NFI, you see more in the shops than on the road!

I've never driven an LF or LFR, however the LFRs seem to have massive corner posts which i could easily see loosing someone in (and even with some of these mirrors ordered by transit agencys it would seem quite possible to loose a person on the street behind it if they were standing just so).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never driven an LF or LFR, however the LFRs seem to have massive corner posts which i could easily see loosing someone in (and even with some of these mirrors ordered by transit agencys it would seem quite possible to loose a person on the street behind it if they were standing just so).

The pass. side mirror I don't have any issues, the major blind spot I find are the front frame between drivers window and driver windshield.

I have a feeling the front door frame between the top and bottom window may have to do with the mass blind spot. Vapor stops making that type of door anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today marks the 10 year anniversary of the Portland street car. I missed out on the festivities, however I managed to go for a ride on a S70 LRV and a Skoda street car. What a beautiful system.

See you next year Portland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for this post. It's interesting to note that Tri-Met didn't go for the lowest bid (Orion) and New Flyer, their previous winner since 1997 was too high. At least, myself and other BFs have a little time to ride what's left of the 1400s & 1700/1800s as the total amount would finally put these buses out to pasture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey there.

Anybody know the maximum operating speed (on main line) the Portland MAX does? Just curious...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to make sure I'm not making stuff up, the purchase details for TriMet's Gillig buses:

http://trimet.org/pdfs/meetings/board/2011...es-11-06-35.pdf

Still waiting to see if this is going to be an early 2012 delivery or a late one...in the meantime, our 1990 Gillig Phantoms look like they are on their last leg...

It'll be worth the wait ... but it will be intriguing for me to finally see a Gillig Low Floor BRT (I think the BRT front end is the only one?) bus in TriMet colors. I'll bet that the powertrain on this batch of buses will be the usual Cummins ISL9 engine / Voith DIWA D864.5 transmission. This renewed association breaks off their 15-year affair with New Flyer.

~Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(I think the BRT front end is the only one?)

Though I'm hoping that TriMet's order is for BRT-style buses, I do know that Salem-Keizer Transit (Cherriots) received and is still receiving 35' and 40' Gillig buses with the standard low floor front and rear package - they still look slick though as they have the frameless windows.

They did have a Gillig LF BRT as the demonstrator bus that they based their decision on - the sight lines issue obviously being important after the pedestrian incident.

I think it's a near certainty that the buses will come with Voith transmissions - I still prefer the ISM engines, but the ISL9 would be what I would put my money on...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think it's a near certainty that the buses will come with Voith transmissions - I still prefer the ISM engines, but the ISL9 would be what I would put my money on...
I believe you are correct that they would be the ISL9 engine as from what I recall, the ISM does not meet EPA2010 emissions. I await someones correction on this however....
Among the many New Flyers in TriMet’s fleet is #2646, seen at the edge of the Downtown Transit Mall near Portland State University. 2646 has been repainted into TriMet’s new scheme:

http://i776.photobucket.com/albums/yy43/Re...sit/WCT3683.jpg

I do realize this is an old post, but I forgot to respond to this until now.... The 2600's series were actually delivered in the livery that is shown on bus 2646 in the above linked image. It was not repainted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I believe you are correct that they would be the ISL9 engine as from what I recall, the ISM does not meet EPA2010 emissions. I await someones correction on this however....I do realize this is an old post, but I forgot to respond to this until now.... The 2600's series were actually delivered in the livery that is shown on bus 2646 in the above linked image. It was not repainted.

Meaning the two 2001 New Flyer hybrids, units 2561-2562, were actually the last TriMet buses delivered in the old livery, but were subsequently repainted into the current livery upon entering service.

Of the 55 new Gillig low floors to be delivered in 2012, 51 of these will be straight diesels while the last four will be hybrids.

~Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in Portland four weeks ago, and saw that there are still lots of Flxible Metros running base service on the west side. I even saw a 30' model.

I should have taken pictures, but I didn't have my camera. I don't think they'll be getting enough Gilligs to retire all the Flxibles, unless they're also cutting service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now