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Orion V

Transit in Hong Kong

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Any idea how long would each agency that have the demo would keep it for? I might be making a trip sometime late next year to Hong Kong.

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I'm in HK now and have several questions on the new models.

1) Are they going to order more 12.8m B9TLs or Enviro 500s?

2) What do they call the 3rd Gen Enviro 500 that KMB and CTB currently have? I know the 2nd Gen is called Enviro 500 MMC so it seems some people confused the 2nd Gen with the 3rd Gen.

3) Do the newest Enviro 500 MMCs and B9TL Gemini IIs have LED interior lighting?

4) Some Enviro 500 1st Gen and Enviro 400 MMCs have violet coloured interior lighting, are these LEDs or just coloured fluorescent?

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On 1/25/2016 at 8:39 AM, Cityflyer said:

I'm in HK now and have several questions on the new models.

1) Are they going to order more 12.8m B9TLs or Enviro 500s?

2) What do they call the 3rd Gen Enviro 500 that KMB and CTB currently have? I know the 2nd Gen is called Enviro 500 MMC so it seems some people confused the 2nd Gen with the 3rd Gen.

3) Do the newest Enviro 500 MMCs and B9TL Gemini IIs have LED interior lighting?

4) Some Enviro 500 1st Gen and Enviro 400 MMCs have violet coloured interior lighting, are these LEDs or just coloured fluorescent?

 

Sorry for the extremely late response, but...

1. Yes.

2. 3rd Gen is called Enviro 500 Facelift or Enviro 500 New Facelift. I've heard both being used.

Don't know the answer to the other two.

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Hi!  After years of comparing the transit systems in Hong Kong and North America, I'd like to raise a few questions here:

1. Why are articulated buses uniquely unsuitable for Hong Kong?

2. Why CNG buses are never tried and adopted there?

3. Why there are no dedicated BRT routes with specially designed stations?

4. And finally for now, why fully electric buses are unsuccessful there so far? (The Chinese built electric buses at Citybus and NWFB are extremely troublesome, with the 6 BYD's pulled out of service, and 4 buses from another Chinese brand have not yet entered service for months.  Likewise, the Young Man's at KMB using a different electric drive are yet to enter service for over a year as well)

Although answers to 2) and 4) has a lot to do with the unusual dependence of long double-deckers in Hong Kong, I still appreciate more insights.

One last side question:  Why are the Chinese so prolific in making fully-electric buses, more so than the Americans and even more so than the British, the traditional supplier of buses to Hong Kong?  Thanks!

 

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2 hours ago, Buzz2kb said:

One last side question:  Why are the Chinese so prolific in making fully-electric buses, more so than the Americans and even more so than the British, the traditional supplier of buses to Hong Kong?  Thanks!

 

Government incentives and investment. Unlike some countries, China recognizes it is a huge polluter and has to take steps to reduce emissions.

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On 1/27/2017 at 5:54 PM, Buzz2kb said:

Hi!  After years of comparing the transit systems in Hong Kong and North America, I'd like to raise a few questions here:

1. Why are articulated buses uniquely unsuitable for Hong Kong?

2. Why CNG buses are never tried and adopted there?

3. Why there are no dedicated BRT routes with specially designed stations?

4. And finally for now, why fully electric buses are unsuccessful there so far? (The Chinese built electric buses at Citybus and NWFB are extremely troublesome, with the 6 BYD's pulled out of service, and 4 buses from another Chinese brand have not yet entered service for months.  Likewise, the Young Man's at KMB using a different electric drive are yet to enter service for over a year as well)

Although answers to 2) and 4) has a lot to do with the unusual dependence of long double-deckers in Hong Kong, I still appreciate more insights.

One last side question:  Why are the Chinese so prolific in making fully-electric buses, more so than the Americans and even more so than the British, the traditional supplier of buses to Hong Kong?  Thanks!

 

1. Takes up more street space, but has less capacity. London went to artics for a while, and ditched them, Community Transit in Seattle is buying double deckers instead of more artics. 

3. There is no need, routes that would be BRT routes already have extremely frequent service, why spend money on brt branding?  

 

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Very bad accident recently in the Sham Shui Po area. 3 dead, more than two dozen injuries. Bus driver is charged in the accident. Citybus E21A.

TVB news 9-22-2017

 

9-24-2017

 

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Uh oh! Incident in Yuen Long captured on CCTV footage that has since gone viral

 

When I saw this on the TV news yesterday, I remember being on that very same platform during my last visit to HK this January. From my observations, the train arrives quite infrequently on this route compared to those towards the Ferry Pier, even during the day. She was lucky not to have been fatally hurt.

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On 1/13/2018 at 6:36 PM, Millennium2002 said:

While I'm still on the fence about the asymmetrical front... it's a very nice looking bus...

Oh do I have a bus for you:

Image result for solaris urbino IV

Super good looking IMO

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Oddly that looks more acceptable to me. I think it's the variety and patterning of the colours at the front of the NWFB Enviro200 that is driving me nuts...

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2 hours ago, Millennium2002 said:

Oddly that looks more acceptable to me. I think it's the variety and patterning of the colours at the front of the NWFB Enviro200 that is driving me nuts...

Yeah the E200 looks kind of off to me as well. The Solaris has always flowed for me, I don't know why. Be it the II or III, they've always looked great, and the IV takes the cake by far. I think it may be because the actual asymmetricality of the bus is structural and not by the paint scheme.  Love all the crispy lines and angles...

Just a really good looking bus. In fact, here's some more:

Image result for solaris urbino IV hamburg

 

Related image

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Let's not deviate from what this topic is about. Here's some news to get us back on track...albeit on another front:

http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/community/article/2127732/hong-kong-mtr-east-rail-line-suspended-due-signal-failure

Not surprising. Singapore is doing a similar signal upgrade on its lines and there have been the same problems with getting the old infrastructure to communicate well with the CBTC technology. (Ironically, the technology used on all of the aforementioned the line upgrades is identical to that of Vancouver - SelTrac by Thales.)

http://yp.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/article/108356/hong-kong’s-beloved-mtr-network-will-soon-enter-new-era-new-trains-new

I am really looking forward to the new line openings. When I visit HK I usually stay at my uncle who lives in Sha Tin. Crossing the harbour needed two changes of trains, which is absolutely irritating especially considering the two changes are only two stations apart. Once the harbour crossing opens I am going to cross over to HK Island every day if I can.

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I'm in HK now and noticed all HF buses have retired except a very small fraction of Citybus Olympians on 88R.

Their retirement from KMB and NWFB were fast!

I guess Citybus Olympians are the newest looking HFs so they are the only ones left in HK.

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3 hours ago, Orion V said:

I'm in HK now and noticed all HF buses have retired except a very small fraction of Citybus Olympians on 88R.

Their retirement from KMB and NWFB were fast!

I guess Citybus Olympians are the newest looking HFs so they are the only ones left in HK.

Strict 18 year retirement policy in HK, except for the remaining Olympians which are non-franchised. The newest Olympians were from 1999, so it's really the end of the HF era there.

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I remember reading somewhere MTR trains have the longest and widest per car dimensions in the world. Can anyone confirm this and where can I find this information?

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On 2018/1/31 at 6:29 AM, Orion V said:

I remember reading somewhere MTR trains have the longest and widest per car dimensions in the world. Can anyone confirm this and where can I find this information?

East Rail Line,now they are still in 12 car.

But in the future after North South Corridor complete, they will be only run 9 car train.

 

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On 2/5/2018 at 10:15 PM, Chinese Daniel said:

East Rail Line,now they are still in 12 car.

But in the future after North South Corridor complete, they will be only run 9 car train.

 

I meant width and length of each train. Not the entire trainset.

I read somewhere each train car is the widest and longest of any heavy rail metros in the world.

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17 minutes ago, Orion V said:

I meant width and length of each train. Not the entire trainset.

I read somewhere each train car is the widest and longest of any heavy rail metros in the world.

Wikipedia reports that the length of the new stock from CRRC Sifang for the urban lines is 24.6 metres for the end cars and 22.55 metres for the intermediate cars. Compare that to Singapore's SMRT, whose upcoming Thomson-East Coast Line will have 23.6 metre-long cars from the same manufacturer.

 

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I feel the MTR car interiors are wider than TTC's that for sure. Door to door; not talking about the sideway facing seats making them appear wider.

TTC's are the largest in Canada per train car width and length for example.

I haven't rode any other heavy rails in the world that's why I would like to know.

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On 2/9/2018 at 8:29 PM, Orion V said:

I feel the MTR car interiors are wider than TTC's that for sure. Door to door; not talking about the sideway facing seats making them appear wider.

TTC's are the largest in Canada per train car width and length for example.

I haven't rode any other heavy rails in the world that's why I would like to know.

The STM Azur trains are longer. A MTR subway car is very similar in dimension as a TR car. It's just a perception that they look wider.

10 hours ago, Orion V said:

That's sad. 

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