Jump to content

Trackless Trolley Shots


Recommended Posts

I was recently in San Francisco, they have lots of trolleybuses there.

ETI/Skoda 40 footer:

DSC03366.JPGDSC03423.JPG

The 60 foot version:

DSC03419.JPG

And quite possibly the rarest trolley of all, the New Flyer E60, sadly this one has had its sign vandalized, interesting note: this picture was taken from the back of a PCC streetcar.

e60.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
I was recently in San Francisco, they have lots of trolleybuses there.

ETI/Skoda 40 footer:

DSC03366.JPGDSC03423.JPG

The 60 foot version:

DSC03419.JPG

And quite possibly the rarest trolley of all, the New Flyer E60, sadly this one has had its sign vandalized, interesting note: this picture was taken from the back of a PCC streetcar.

e60.jpg

Nice pics, and I've never seen an E60 in my entire life! Wow! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Nice pics, and I've never seen an E60 in my entire life! Wow! :lol:
Hehe, I just turned 19 yet I've already ridden one. It was even more interesting when MUNI still had D60s running as well, as then the only way to tell which was which was by the trolley poles. Well that and the fact that the diesels had flipdot designation signs.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice pics, and I've never seen an E60 in my entire life! Wow! :lol:

Its the most EPIC ride EVER!! Last time I went down to SF... which was about 4 or 5 years ago, they still had a couple of E60's in the old muni scheme. But I got to say the acceleration on those things... awesome. Still I wonder what they'll replace the E60's with... E60LFR's?

- Bryan "Goggles"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Its the most EPIC ride EVER!! Last time I went down to SF... which was about 4 or 5 years ago, they still had a couple of E60's in the old muni scheme. But I got to say the acceleration on those things... awesome. Still I wonder what they'll replace the E60's with... E60LFR's?

- Bryan "Goggles"

I sure hope they replace some of their trolleys with some New Flyers! An E40LFR or E60LFR would look great in MUNI paint. But I don't think it will be anytime soon that they'll start replacing some as they finished the delivery of the ETIs in around 2003.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I sure hope they replace some of their trolleys with some New Flyers! An E40LFR or E60LFR would look great in MUNI paint. But I don't think it will be anytime soon that they'll start replacing some as they finished the delivery of the ETIs in around 2003.

Well last time I checked those things are between 1994 and 1996 so... it won't be long before they start retiring them. Which means that we could see E60LFR's in the MUNI Colors.

- Bryan "Goggles"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well last time I checked those things are between 1994 and 1996 so... it won't be long before they start retiring them. Which means that we could see E60LFR's in the MUNI Colors.

- Bryan "Goggles"

Trolleybuses generally last longer than diesel buses. Muni operated Flyer E800s from 1976 to 2007, after all. It's probably safe to say that the E60s will be running around for at least another five years, if not more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well last time I checked those things are between 1994 and 1996 so... it won't be long before they start retiring them. Which means that we could see E60LFR's in the MUNI Colors.

- Bryan "Goggles"

Just look at those E800s that MUNI had, they're iirc from the 1970s. They lasted quite some time.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Trolleybuses generally last longer than diesel buses. Muni operated Flyer E800s from 1976 to 2007, after all. It's probably safe to say that the E60s will be running around for at least another five years, if not more.

IMO, an E60 should have at least the lifespan of an E800. 31 years is impressive for an E800, based on all of the issues they were known for :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
Trolleybuses generally last longer than diesel buses. Muni operated Flyer E800s from 1976 to 2007, after all. It's probably safe to say that the E60s will be running around for at least another five years, if not more.

Good point, totally forgot about that.

Just look at those E800s that MUNI had, they're iirc from the 1970s. They lasted quite some time.

Oh yea... our E901's lasted a little over 20 years.

- Bryan "Goggles"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well last time I checked those things are between 1994 and 1996 so... it won't be long before they start retiring them. Which means that we could see E60LFR's in the MUNI Colors.

MUNI's NFI E60's were built in 1993 (First one may have been built in 1992 IIRC? ). For a Trolley Coach, those are still young buses. However, MUNI did have a fair bit of trouble with them especially when they were new as well into later years and many have already been retired for several years.

its missing a pole???

Pole is more than likely there, but is not up at the overhead at that moment.

Oh yea... our E901's lasted a little over 20 years.

And think of how long the old Canadian Car Brill Trolley Coaches lasted in Vancouver. The last of the Brills from 1949 were retired in 1983-84.

Edited by MBTA9244-9640b
Link to post
Share on other sites
A cupple of pics from the weekend charter

Trolleybus charters in Philly are always interesting. Too bad they don't have any historical vehicles to charter, but the one I attended in 2008 in honor of the revival of northeast Philly's trolleybus network was definitely worth it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
looks like one of the polls jumped the wire in this pic:O

No, the poles just split the switch--either the switch itself was jammed or the driver didn't power on at the right time.

The Marine Station overhead (like many transit projects these days) is the product of too much engineering and too little consideration for practical operations. All of the bypass switches and crossovers in the bus loop increase the possibility of screw-ups by drivers and equipment, and split poles and dewirements are common there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
No, the poles just split the switch--either the switch itself was jammed or the driver didn't power on at the right time.

The Marine Station overhead (like many transit projects these days) is the product of too much engineering and too little consideration for practical operations. All of the bypass switches and crossovers in the bus loop increase the possibility of screw-ups by drivers and equipment, and split poles and dewirements are common there.

Oh yeah, that's for sure. I never even noticed that in my shot before but I have noticed it quite a few times in the past. Plus my friend was going through trolley re-training and he dewired several times there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...