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Valley Metro (Phoenix)

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I was wondering, does anyone know what is the current status of Valley Metro's New Flyer orders? According to Wikipedia, they will be the launch customer for three models: the L40LFR, C40LFA, and D40LFA. Does anyone know about these orders?

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I was wondering, has anyone seen Valley Metro's (Phoenix) new L40LFRs from New Flyer? According to Wikipedia they operated the L40LFR since late 2009, making them the launch customer for the model. I am not surprised, as Valley Metro is pretty much the only major TA who purchases LNG buses nowadays.

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The next time I am in Phoenix, I will look for the L40LFRs. What's odd is that the L40LFRs are operating out of a division that has full CNG capability (and already operates CNG buses).

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Wonder if it's a beautiful Wikitypo, then...

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Wonder if it's a beautiful Wikitypo, then...

I don't think so, as it states that the L40LFRs are the 666x buses numbered 6669 and higher, while the new C40LFRs are numbered below 6669.

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I don't think so, as it states that the L40LFRs are the 666x buses numbered 6669 and higher, while the new C40LFRs are numbered below 6669.

If I may:

Here's what I was told about and the "DE40LFR" bus:

"Basically, one of the buses being referenced is regarding a 40ft Diesel Electric Hybrid Buses (DE40LFR). Valley Metro RPTA does not have any of these buses, nor are we currently contracted to buy any. A month ago, the bus manufacturer New Flyer did have a DE40LFA Diesel Electric Hybrid here for testing purposes, but since has returned back to Oregon."

About the L40LFR bus:

"Regarding L40LFR buses, pictures would have to be obtained from City of Tempe facility as their first prototype of this design (L40LFR) has now been received. The total order placed is seven (7). These buses operate on Liquefied Natural Gas."

Yes, I'm actually asking for pics of their L40LFR bus so hopefully I'll be lucky with this one. I haven't asked yet about the assigned fleet #s for the L40LFRs.

Hope this helps in any way.

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The City of Tempe has ordered L40LFRs to replace some of their LNG ElDorado EZRiders and/or LNG NABI 40LFWs. However, their facility offers full CNG refueling capabilities and they've been operating 2008 C40LFRs out of their garage since the C40LFRs were delivered in 2008. Therefore, I am quite surprised that they ordered L40LFRs versus C40LFRs (especially since the current LNG NABIs have "range issues"). The City of Phoenix solved the "range issue" problem by operating 96 D40LFs and 70 D60LFs in addition to their majority LNG NABI fleet.

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Went to New FLyer today, and i seen two L40LFR's awaiting final work. Sorry for the bad photos and the stupid fence in the way. Anyways... this is a little preview of what they'll look like!! :P

phpwNDavUPM.jpgtmpphpubinru.jpg

tmpphp1LJM9I.jpg

And a question about LNG vs. CNG. I see that CNG's tend to run in warm to hot climates (LA, Las Vegas, California, Vancouver) and that would be to an advantage as the "warm-ness" would help the CNG fuel to flow smoothly. However, in cooler climates like where WMATA and HSR, would they have problems in the winter where the CNG fuel would turn into liquid (liquid point of Natural Gas is -49 degrees C i think) and mess up the engine, and freeze important equipment? Thats were LNG would be useful. So seeing that these LNG's are heading to a very warm enviornment, would there be problems where the fuel would turn into a gas?? (Sorry for the long question) I might be a noob for asking this! :lol:

phpwNDavUPM.jpg

tmpphp1LJM9I.jpg

tmpphpubinru.jpg

post-2106-1267234256_thumb.jpg

post-2106-1267234293_thumb.jpg

post-2106-1267234328_thumb.jpg

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Went to New FLyer today, and i seen two L40LFR's awaiting final work. Sorry for the bad photos and the stupid fence in the way. Anyways... this is a little preview of what they'll look like!! :P

phpwNDavUPM.jpgtmpphpubinru.jpg

tmpphp1LJM9I.jpg

And a question about LNG vs. CNG. I see that CNG's tend to run in warm to hot climates (LA, Las Vegas, California, Vancouver) and that would be to an advantage as the "warm-ness" would help the CNG fuel to flow smoothly. However, in cooler climates like where WMATA and HSR, would they have problems in the winter where the CNG fuel would turn into liquid (liquid point of Natural Gas is -49 degrees C i think) and mess up the engine, and freeze important equipment? Thats were LNG would be useful. So seeing that these LNG's are heading to a very warm enviornment, would there be problems where the fuel would turn into a gas?? (Sorry for the long question) I might be a noob for asking this! :lol:

I don't think so, considering Valley Metro is the largest LNG bus operator in America and possibly the world.

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Went to New FLyer today, and i seen two L40LFR's awaiting final work. Sorry for the bad photos and the stupid fence in the way. Anyways... this is a little preview of what they'll look like!! :P

Thanks for the pictures. Interesting to see that they've specified these buses with unpainted window frames (their previous buses from New Flyer have black frames.)

And a question about LNG vs. CNG. I see that CNG's tend to run in warm to hot climates (LA, Las Vegas, California, Vancouver) and that would be to an advantage as the "warm-ness" would help the CNG fuel to flow smoothly. However, in cooler climates like where WMATA and HSR, would they have problems in the winter where the CNG fuel would turn into liquid (liquid point of Natural Gas is -49 degrees C i think) and mess up the engine, and freeze important equipment? Thats were LNG would be useful. So seeing that these LNG's are heading to a very warm enviornment, would there be problems where the fuel would turn into a gas?? (Sorry for the long question) I might be a noob for asking this! :lol:

I don't think that the climate affects the CNG system that much. CNG buses run in Boston and New York, two other cities with harsh climates, and they don't seem to have any problems in the winter.

Both LNG and CNG are stored in pressurized containers that largely ensure that the outside temperature doesn't affect the state of the gas.

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I don't think so, considering Valley Metro is the largest LNG bus operator in America and possibly the world.

Isn't that LA?

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LA is largest CNG...

That is correct, LACMTA doesn't operate any LNG buses. OCTA has the largest LNG fleet in southern California, and perhaps the second largest in the USA.

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I don't think so, as it states that the L40LFRs are the 666x buses numbered 6669 and higher, while the new C40LFRs are numbered below 6669.

The new C40LFRs are numbered 6649-6668 and their serial nos. are 9C035133-9C035152.

6667-6668 have the new livery for the Valley Metro, and I happened to ride 6667 about a month ago.

Stalwart23

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Here are the following serial and fleet numbers for the 2006 and 2008 NFI C40LFRs for Valley Metro in Phoenix.

2006 C40LFRs

6401-6452 s/n: 6C029551-29602

2008 C40LFRs

6597-6647 s/n: 8C033359-33409

The 2008 buses differ from the 2006 with LED interior lighting on the '08 buses.

If anyone knows anymore VIN numbers from Valley Metro buses, your gladly welcome to post them.

Stalwart23

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The new C40LFRs are numbered 6649-6668 and their serial nos. are 9C035133-9C035152.

6667-6668 have the new livery for the Valley Metro, and I happened to ride 6667 about a month ago.

Stalwart23

I saw 6669 yesterday, in a color scheme modified from what is on 6667/6668. Also, I am pretty sure I have seen 6648 as a 2009 C40LFR.

3we

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The 2008s also have Cummins ISL-G engines (whereas the 2006s have John Deere's).

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Hi guys,

Here are a couple pictures of 6669 which can frequently be found operating on the 72:

Photo0220.jpg

Photo0221.jpg

Personally, I like this new livery a lot and I am curious as to why the other L40LFR's currently in production are in the old livery!

The interior of this bus is very different from any of the other restyled New Flyers in the Valley Metro fleet; the seats seem to be made out of that recycled fabric like 6667/8 but with a different pattern. Also it has pull chords like the D40LFR's and the early C40LFR's!

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Bet she runs beautifully, does anyone know the powertrain specifications?

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Bet she runs beautifully, does anyone know the powertrain specifications?

Sounds like a cummins and she definitely has a ZF... thats as specific as I can be though!

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Why does it look like the rear door and one of its windows were switched? It looks like NABI's 40-LFWs.

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Why does it look like the rear door and one of its windows were switched? It looks like NABI's 40-LFWs.

That's the standard configuration that Valley Metro uses on most of their New Flyer 40' low floors. In fact, the only New Flyer low floors that do not have that door configuration are the ex-airport C40LFs, the 2006 C40LFRs, and the 2007 D40LFRs. The 1994 D40LFs, 1996 D40LFs, 2007 D40LFs, 2008 C40LFRs, 2009 C40LFRs, and 2010 L40LFRs all had/had the door after the second window on the passenger side.

Remember, Phoenix was the first operator of the NABI 40-LFW, so they derived that design in part from the design of the 1994 and 1996 D40LFs that Valley Metro had.

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