Jump to content

The Random Thoughts Thread


buswizard
 Share

Recommended Posts

14 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

I'm sorry it's come down to the decision whether to stay or go.  It's a shame you've decided to leave the city but I understand; I've been feeling the same issues for a long time as well.  The congestion, lack of career opportunities, the crappy attitude.  It's weighed on a lot of people.  The word extravagant doesn't even begin to describe housing prices.  Back in the spring, I was helping a friend at work move some stuff into his new place, totally the burden of being the person with the biggest SUV right, and we were coming down Keele or Weston or maybe Old Weston Rd, I've forgotten which, and we were approaching St. Clair and we saw this piece of garbage house with no back yard, front wall's right at the concrete sidewalk with no lawn or anything and we both looked at each other and we both had the same thought:  this is a million dollars.  A detached house in fairly central Toronto on a transit line like the St. Clair car is a million dollars easy even if it's a piece of junk like this dump was.  Unless you're an office worker in a high paying job that offsets the cost of living here, Toronto is a bad place to be.  I don't blame anybody for deciding to move away.  It's a shame to be boxed into a corner and forced into making that decision though.

Thanks. Really I feel that this has been in the making for a long time now. I grew up here so I have a certain amount of nostalgia towards the Toronto that I used to know when I was younger, but in the last few years I've really become disillusioned with the way the city is now (or rather, how I perceive it now as a grown up).

I hear you on the garbage dumps going for a million dollars. Perhaps an area like Moss Park might still be affordable, but it seems that everywhere else, no matter how unappealing the neighbourhood is, you'll get houses going up for these sky-high prices that very few working class people could ever hope to live in. Your other options are to live elsewhere and have an astronomically high commuting time, or try to rent. Good luck with that. Even putting aside how living here would mean you have to battle your way through the streets, dodging selfish motorists who think that following the basic rules of the road is optional, and the increasing numbers of homeless people who the city seems content to not do anything about, I once read that rent in this city costs 70% of minimum wage. How is anyone who is consigned to that kind of working life supposed to save up any money for the future? A real dismal prospect, that's for sure.

14 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

I've been thinking about the CLRV wind down and I've been having trouble getting my thoughts in order.  I guess these are my random thoughts which given the thread title are probably appropriate.  They're the last vehicle that was interesting to me.  I've never been much of a bus fan but the ones I did like are all gone.  The trolleybus system is completely gone.  All the pre-CLRV streetcars are gone.  The subway's unbelievably bland.  It's kind of tough to believe but in less than three weeks, the streetcar system's going to be a combination of bland and partial supposedly temporary abandonment.  I don't think there's been only one type of streetcar running in Toronto at any point in history before, once the last of the CLRVs go.

I hear you on this one. At one point when I was a teenager the CLRVs were my favourite type of streetcar, probably. Fortunately I've changed my preferences to the Tatra T3 since then, which I feel is an improvement because the signs are pointing to this being a design that will likely reign the streets of Prague even after I'm gone. The design was around for 35 years before I was born, and even to this day there are conversations about harvesting the trucks from the older cars, originally built in the 1960s and 1970s, that are still around, and giving them a new low floor body. Assuming that they carry this on for the next 5 years or so, and the cars live to be 40, and they continue to run the many historical units in regular, publicly accessible passenger service even after their retirement, it could be almost 70 years after I was born and those cars will still be a recognizable sight. I wonder how many Torontonians in 2067 will remember the CLRVs or even the PCCs?

As for the Toronto fleet, the amount of things to see is really dismal. I enjoy some of the newer vehicles from an exterior aesthetic perspective (the Nova hybrids and even Flexitys) but they'll never have the charm of the generations that came before them. I'm not much of a bus fan by nature, but the last ones that were worthwhile vehicles were the 1996 Orion Vs. Every bus since then that has had no dedicated standee area, which means that if you're standing, you're in someone's way, which blows. If you're in a packed vehicle, every single stop is like the most dreary routine of musical chairs.

14 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

The TTC's got every right to do the last run however they want but I disagree with how it's been turned into a total marketing event with the over the top terms and conditions on that contest.  It kind of reminds me of how 2766 went out on the Harbourfont on Canada Day 150 back in 2017.  It carried people aboard.  I got a text message from one of them.  I'd have loved to have gone for a ride but it was another closed access event.  Reading the text message left me wondering why volunteer, why put out the effort on stuff like this if you're going to get slapped in the face.

I often find myself wondering why they bother with restoring these vehicles if they spent 98% of their time parked away in some shed, far away from prying eyes or sunlight. They don't run them on Christmas specials, they don't run them on spring specials, and the average joe certainly is not well off enough financially to even be able to afford a private charter (which, incidentally, is why I always roll my eyes at the people who suggest that the solution to our very low amounts of historical vehicles is for average people to buy them and restore them).

What they did with the historical cars and bus back in September during the Leslie/Greenwood open house was a step in the right direction. I'd love to see more of that. I'd love to see them do the same thing for key doors open venues in the immediate vicinity of the TTC facility that is open, and even run them as a shuttle for non-TTC stuff. In Slovakia, every year, there's a weekend in May where a ton of art galleries and museums in the city centre do all kinds of special events and exhibits, and in Bratislava they run a bunch of historical vehicles in celebration of that. I don't think that Toronto does anything like that, but on busy weekends at the ROM, or for special shows at Roy Thomson Hall, or anything like that, I don't think it would be out of place to run historical vehicles as a connection to those venues.

14 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

If you're aren't, there's really nothing for you there so those four cars might as well not exist and if nowhere else other than IRM obtains any, the idea of going somewhere else within a day's drive for a weekend trip to enjoy is off the table.

Indeed. And heaven help you if you don't own a car, either. I used to volunteer at the HCRR, helping to set up their Halloween shows, but I stopped after a while because getting up there was problematic to arrange, and thanks to the lack of reception up there, coordinating a ride back was an absolute nightmare, especially if I got caught up with something and I couldn't let the person picking me up know that I wouldn't be at the gates at the agreed upon time. I was always working out of the way so I didn't get to know many of the people there, so I can't comment necessarily about the organization being cliquish.

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Thanks. Really I feel that this has been in the making for a long time now. I grew up here so I have a certain amount of nostalgia towards the Toronto that I used to know when I was younger, but in the last few years I've really become disillusioned with the way the city is now (or rather, how I perceive it now as a grown up).

I hear you on the garbage dumps going for a million dollars. Perhaps an area like Moss Park might still be affordable, but it seems that everywhere else, no matter how unappealing the neighbourhood is, you'll get houses going up for these sky-high prices that very few working class people could ever hope to live in. Your other options are to live elsewhere and have an astronomically high commuting time, or try to rent. Good luck with that. Even putting aside how living here would mean you have to battle your way through the streets, dodging selfish motorists who think that following the basic rules of the road is optional, and the increasing numbers of homeless people who the city seems content to not do anything about, I once read that rent in this city costs 70% of minimum wage. How is anyone who is consigned to that kind of working life supposed to save up any money for the future? A real dismal prospect, that's for sure.

I feel the same way having grown up in Toronto for the most part with a couple of brief times elsewhere.  Disillusionment started setting in for me when I was in high school.  And that isn't recent.  It's starting to get unsettling how not recent that is which speaks to how long things have been sliding in Toronto for.  Even back then when I was a kid getting the university-or-bust routine rammed down my throat, wages were already starting to stagnate but the cost of living, namely housing, was beginning to take off on its long flight.  One evening, my parents were talking excitedly one night about how a house on our street sold for $750K.  I was mulling that over on the way home from high school a few days later thinking about how, based on what I knew of salaries at the time in the fields I was interested in, I wasn't going to able to afford to buy a house in the neighbourhood I grew up in without getting seriously lucky somehow.  What I didn't expect was to be priced completely out of the city I grew up in.

At the same time, the Toronto I used to know, the old "City That Works", that's long gone.  The traffic, the crowding on the sidewalks, the crowding on the TTC, the general neglect and deterioration of everything, all that's a huge slide backwards from the Toronto of 30, 35+ years ago.  If you stop to look at it, the city looks worn out and run down.  The CLRVs are a good example.  They're old and the TTC hasn't kept them up, and they've worn out.  Sure, there's some new streetcars to replace them but they city managed to seriously underpurchase the number that the place needs even taking into account the fact that the streetcar map hasn't change any since 1997 except for that short stretch of infill track on Queen's Quay between Spadina and Bathurst and the stub going down to the distillery.  And the modern Toronto mentality of the people living here is mind boggling to me anyways.

8 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

I hear you on this one. At one point when I was a teenager the CLRVs were my favourite type of streetcar, probably. Fortunately I've changed my preferences to the Tatra T3 since then, which I feel is an improvement because the signs are pointing to this being a design that will likely reign the streets of Prague even after I'm gone. The design was around for 35 years before I was born, and even to this day there are conversations about harvesting the trucks from the older cars, originally built in the 1960s and 1970s, that are still around, and giving them a new low floor body. Assuming that they carry this on for the next 5 years or so, and the cars live to be 40, and they continue to run the many historical units in regular, publicly accessible passenger service even after their retirement, it could be almost 70 years after I was born and those cars will still be a recognizable sight. I wonder how many Torontonians in 2067 will remember the CLRVs or even the PCCs?

As for the Toronto fleet, the amount of things to see is really dismal. I enjoy some of the newer vehicles from an exterior aesthetic perspective (the Nova hybrids and even Flexitys) but they'll never have the charm of the generations that came before them. I'm not much of a bus fan by nature, but the last ones that were worthwhile vehicles were the 1996 Orion Vs. Every bus since then that has had no dedicated standee area, which means that if you're standing, you're in someone's way, which blows. If you're in a packed vehicle, every single stop is like the most dreary routine of musical chairs.

I often find myself wondering why they bother with restoring these vehicles if they spent 98% of their time parked away in some shed, far away from prying eyes or sunlight. They don't run them on Christmas specials, they don't run them on spring specials, and the average joe certainly is not well off enough financially to even be able to afford a private charter (which, incidentally, is why I always roll my eyes at the people who suggest that the solution to our very low amounts of historical vehicles is for average people to buy them and restore them).

What they did with the historical cars and bus back in September during the Leslie/Greenwood open house was a step in the right direction. I'd love to see more of that. I'd love to see them do the same thing for key doors open venues in the immediate vicinity of the TTC facility that is open, and even run them as a shuttle for non-TTC stuff. In Slovakia, every year, there's a weekend in May where a ton of art galleries and museums in the city centre do all kinds of special events and exhibits, and in Bratislava they run a bunch of historical vehicles in celebration of that. I don't think that Toronto does anything like that, but on busy weekends at the ROM, or for special shows at Roy Thomson Hall, or anything like that, I don't think it would be out of place to run historical vehicles as a connection to those venues.

Toronto has very few nice things left in general and of those things that do exist, they're very poorly utilized.  I honestly really thought putting out one or both PCC cars on the Harbourfront line on Sunday afternoons was a piss poor substitute from when the line opened and was all PCC all the time.  Now, we don't even get that.  Private charters are pretty much off the table now because of what they've done to the rates.

8 hours ago, PCC Guy said:

Indeed. And heaven help you if you don't own a car, either. I used to volunteer at the HCRR, helping to set up their Halloween shows, but I stopped after a while because getting up there was problematic to arrange, and thanks to the lack of reception up there, coordinating a ride back was an absolute nightmare, especially if I got caught up with something and I couldn't let the person picking me up know that I wouldn't be at the gates at the agreed upon time. I was always working out of the way so I didn't get to know many of the people there, so I can't comment necessarily about the organization being cliquish.

HCRR's location definitely does not work out if you don't have a car.  I remember reading someone's public transit routing to get there and back many years ago and it involved a number of Go bus connections and a mighty long walk down Guelph Line.  I can only imagine that if there was any kind of weather on the walk up or down you'd be soaked to the bone and probably pick up a nasty sunburn regardless during the summer.  When I was in high school and my grandparents required elder care in the place they were living at in Oakville, I'd get my parents to drop me off at HCRR and then pick me up after spending the day with my grandparents taking care of things at their place.  This was also before cellphones period so co-ordinating all this was cumbersome at best but I made it work and was there regularly.  But wow, what a nightmare to make it work especially since this was in the pre-cellphone era.  Nobody seemed to be interested in the idea of carpooling people who didn't drive or didn't have vehicles to or from somewhere on the TTC in Toronto or at a minimum the train station in Burlington which is not far at all from Guelph Line and the QEW.  It's definitely one of those places you need a car for due to the location because the workarounds for not having one are ugly.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/10/2019 at 6:45 PM, Wayside Observer said:

It kind of reminds me of how 2766 went out on the Harbourfont on Canada Day 150 back in 2017.  It carried people aboard.  I got a text message from one of them.  I'd have loved to have gone for a ride but it was another closed access event

That actually was a public event. However after one or two trips, someone higher up decided to restrict access. I don’t remember what the reason was. Could have had something to do with crowds.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

I feel the same way having grown up in Toronto for the most part with a couple of brief times elsewhere.  Disillusionment started setting in for me when I was in high school.  And that isn't recent.  It's starting to get unsettling how not recent that is which speaks to how long things have been sliding in Toronto for.  Even back then when I was a kid getting the university-or-bust routine rammed down my throat, wages were already starting to stagnate but the cost of living, namely housing, was beginning to take off on its long flight.  One evening, my parents were talking excitedly one night about how a house on our street sold for $750K.  I was mulling that over on the way home from high school a few days later thinking about how, based on what I knew of salaries at the time in the fields I was interested in, I wasn't going to able to afford to buy a house in the neighbourhood I grew up in without getting seriously lucky somehow.  What I didn't expect was to be priced completely out of the city I grew up in.

At the same time, the Toronto I used to know, the old "City That Works", that's long gone.  The traffic, the crowding on the sidewalks, the crowding on the TTC, the general neglect and deterioration of everything, all that's a huge slide backwards from the Toronto of 30, 35+ years ago.  If you stop to look at it, the city looks worn out and run down.  The CLRVs are a good example.  They're old and the TTC hasn't kept them up, and they've worn out.  Sure, there's some new streetcars to replace them but they city managed to seriously underpurchase the number that the place needs even taking into account the fact that the streetcar map hasn't change any since 1997 except for that short stretch of infill track on Queen's Quay between Spadina and Bathurst and the stub going down to the distillery.  And the modern Toronto mentality of the people living here is mind boggling to me anyways.

I get the general sentiment that things in Toronto feel 'run down' per say, but it's nowhere near the level of Chicago, NYC, Boston, Portland, Baltimore, Montreal, DC, Cleveland, Detroit, Hamilton, Windsor, Montreal, or dare I say Pittsburgh and Philadelphia (and I absolutely love those cities with a passion). Yet I find all these cities have a defined character (except Windsor and Hamilton). Cities are strapped for cash, so the perceived wearing down will happen, but most of these cities have always kept their heritage with them. 

The only North American cities that hold the perceived notions of being "Modern and Kept Well" are Vancouver, Portland Oregon, Seattle, Denver, Calgary, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, the Toronto suburbs (excluding Hamilton) (I made the differentiation here because of the stark differences between Toronto proper and the suburbs) and perhaps Waterloo. I hate to say it, but these cities don't have a fifth of the characteristics of the aforementioned cities IMO. Old, and run down isn't necessarily bad, so long as it's kept well. Toronto is somewhere in the middle — a city of history and an aged aesthetic, while still succumbing to the blandness that is modernity. The CLRVs made Toronto extremely unique, even if they weren't as well kept as they should have been in their late years, seeing them gone, to me, only makes the city seem more and more modular and bland. 

Come to think of it, I'm really starting to see Toronto more of as Canada's San Francisco, rather than Canada's New York — A streetcar city with out of control housing issues, struggling to balance the needs of housing, culture, history, infrastructure renewal, citizen neighborliness, and happiness in general. 

7 hours ago, Wayside Observer said:

Toronto has very few nice things left in general and of those things that do exist, they're very poorly utilized.  I honestly really thought putting out one or both PCC cars on the Harbourfront line on Sunday afternoons was a piss poor substitute from when the line opened and was all PCC all the time.  Now, we don't even get that.  Private charters are pretty much off the table now because of what they've done to the rates.

Worst of all, it's not just the transit-fan stuff (though they royally fucked up by not saving any H series stock. Sure the PCCs barely run, but at least they have some). All the attractions here are outrageously expensive and honestly far less impressive than their US counterparts (though to be fair, a lot of it has to do with the stark population differences of Canada and the US in general). The streetcar suburb identity is constantly under attack by Metrolinx, the TTC (moreso the board), and suburbanites. Gentrification is absolutely everywhere (while I don't mind gentrification as a whole, it's done in all the wrong areas. Sheppard and Eglinton is where they should focus the majority of it. Throw in the Portlands as well, but the Beaches, Humber bay shore, the harbor front, etc?). The parks are all bland as hell and dilapidated (seriously, why is it that we spend so much time and effort focusing on the sakura in High Park while letting the park look like shit the rest of the year?), etc etc etc. 

 

Sorry for the mini rant. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/9/2019 at 5:13 PM, Wayside Observer said:

and lament the fact that so few of these machines are going to end up preserved for future generations to see

On 12/10/2019 at 6:45 PM, Wayside Observer said:

With respect to preservation outside of the TTC, the only known confirmed cars are the four that went to HCRR plus the one that went to IRM.

Given the circumstances in Toronto we should be grateful to at least have one preserved, let alone 4 or 5. There are other vehicles that should have been saved yet none of them were. 

13 hours ago, Streety McCarface said:

(though they royally fucked up by not saving any H series stock)

 

On 12/10/2019 at 6:45 PM, Wayside Observer said:

I've been thinking about the CLRV wind down and I've been having trouble getting my thoughts in order.  I guess these are my random thoughts which given the thread title are probably appropriate.  They're the last vehicle that was interesting to me.  I've never been much of a bus fan but the ones I did like are all gone.  The trolleybus system is completely gone.  All the pre-CLRV streetcars are gone.  The subway's unbelievably bland.  It's kind of tough to believe but in less than three weeks, the streetcar system's going to be a combination of bland and partial supposedly temporary abandonment.  I don't think there's been only one type of streetcar running in Toronto at any point in history before, once the last of the CLRVs go.

The subway may be a lot more bland without the H-cars, but at least with the T1's around it's not as bland as some other "world class city" subway systems. Budapest's subway system is similar to Toronto in their fleet allocations, where two lines (2 and 4) have articulated TR-type trains, and another line (3) has the non-articulated 81-717.2K trains (though unlike the T1's those are not married pairs (would've been cool if they were)), and I don't consider the Budapest subway bland by any measure, even with the original 81-717's gone, at least their legacy lives on with the 81-717.2K (the articulated trains on lines 2 and 4 are pretty nice too). And the TR's are actually a lot nicer than their equivalent counterparts in many other cities (especially when they have full body ad wraps).

On 12/11/2019 at 9:16 AM, PCC Guy said:

I hear you on this one. At one point when I was a teenager the CLRVs were my favourite type of streetcar, probably. Fortunately I've changed my preferences to the Tatra T3 since then, which I feel is an improvement because the signs are pointing to this being a design that will likely reign the streets of Prague even after I'm gone. The design was around for 35 years before I was born, and even to this day there are conversations about harvesting the trucks from the older cars, originally built in the 1960s and 1970s, that are still around, and giving them a new low floor body. Assuming that they carry this on for the next 5 years or so, and the cars live to be 40, and they continue to run the many historical units in regular, publicly accessible passenger service even after their retirement, it could be almost 70 years after I was born and those cars will still be a recognizable sight. I wonder how many Torontonians in 2067 will remember the CLRVs or even the PCCs?

I feel the same about the H5 and 81-717 as you do about the CLRV and T3. The 81-717's certainly have a better fate than the H5 given how ubiquitous they are across eastern Europe and how long their production line has kept going (1976 - 2014). I don't know if they'll still be around in 2070 though.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/11/2019 at 6:54 PM, Wayside Observer said:

I feel the same way having grown up in Toronto for the most part with a couple of brief times elsewhere.  Disillusionment started setting in for me when I was in high school.  And that isn't recent.  It's starting to get unsettling how not recent that is which speaks to how long things have been sliding in Toronto for.  Even back then when I was a kid getting the university-or-bust routine rammed down my throat, wages were already starting to stagnate but the cost of living, namely housing, was beginning to take off on its long flight.  One evening, my parents were talking excitedly one night about how a house on our street sold for $750K.  I was mulling that over on the way home from high school a few days later thinking about how, based on what I knew of salaries at the time in the fields I was interested in, I wasn't going to able to afford to buy a house in the neighbourhood I grew up in without getting seriously lucky somehow.  What I didn't expect was to be priced completely out of the city I grew up in.

At the same time, the Toronto I used to know, the old "City That Works", that's long gone.  The traffic, the crowding on the sidewalks, the crowding on the TTC, the general neglect and deterioration of everything, all that's a huge slide backwards from the Toronto of 30, 35+ years ago.  If you stop to look at it, the city looks worn out and run down.  The CLRVs are a good example.  They're old and the TTC hasn't kept them up, and they've worn out.  Sure, there's some new streetcars to replace them but they city managed to seriously underpurchase the number that the place needs even taking into account the fact that the streetcar map hasn't change any since 1997 except for that short stretch of infill track on Queen's Quay between Spadina and Bathurst and the stub going down to the distillery.  And the modern Toronto mentality of the people living here is mind boggling to me anyways.

Toronto has very few nice things left in general and of those things that do exist, they're very poorly utilized.  I honestly really thought putting out one or both PCC cars on the Harbourfront line on Sunday afternoons was a piss poor substitute from when the line opened and was all PCC all the time.  Now, we don't even get that.  Private charters are pretty much off the table now because of what they've done to the rates.

HCRR's location definitely does not work out if you don't have a car.  I remember reading someone's public transit routing to get there and back many years ago and it involved a number of Go bus connections and a mighty long walk down Guelph Line.  I can only imagine that if there was any kind of weather on the walk up or down you'd be soaked to the bone and probably pick up a nasty sunburn regardless during the summer.  When I was in high school and my grandparents required elder care in the place they were living at in Oakville, I'd get my parents to drop me off at HCRR and then pick me up after spending the day with my grandparents taking care of things at their place.  This was also before cellphones period so co-ordinating all this was cumbersome at best but I made it work and was there regularly.  But wow, what a nightmare to make it work especially since this was in the pre-cellphone era.  Nobody seemed to be interested in the idea of carpooling people who didn't drive or didn't have vehicles to or from somewhere on the TTC in Toronto or at a minimum the train station in Burlington which is not far at all from Guelph Line and the QEW.  It's definitely one of those places you need a car for due to the location because the workarounds for not having one are ugly.

Ugh. I've been to the museum on foot before. I can remember the route but I don't know if it is the same today. The bus rates sure as hell aren't. I remember it was about $18 round trip and I'd get the Guelph bus from York Mills and get off at "Wellington Road #44". The walk was brutal but nothing to me because I do a lot of walking but at that age back then, it took me an hour to walk the four kilometres from highway 7. Once I just used a Razor scooter and it was fun going from the museum on that but not towards the museum because there's a big long hill you have to climb.

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Downsview 108 said:

Ugh. I've been to the museum on foot before. I can remember the route but I don't know if it is the same today. The bus rates sure as hell aren't. I remember it was about $18 round trip and I'd get the Guelph bus from York Mills and get off at "Wellington Road #44". The walk was brutal but nothing to me because I do a lot of walking but at that age back then, it took me an hour to walk the four kilometres from highway 7. Once I just used a Razor scooter and it was fun going from the museum on that but not towards the museum because there's a big long hill you have to climb.

Ouch!   I couldn’t do it.  The walk wouldn’t be the problem for me, walking that kind of distance in a day is no problem at all, it would be the unshaded summer sun during that walk up and down that would kill me.  I’ve never been able to take much sun and I’d fry.  I’d be burnt to a crisp.

5 hours ago, 81-717 said:

Given the circumstances in Toronto we should be grateful to at least have one preserved, let alone 4 or 5. There are other vehicles that should have been saved yet none of them were. 

 

The subway may be a lot more bland without the H-cars, but at least with the T1's around it's not as bland as some other "world class city" subway systems. Budapest's subway system is similar to Toronto in their fleet allocations, where two lines (2 and 4) have articulated TR-type trains, and another line (3) has the non-articulated 81-717.2K trains (though unlike the T1's those are not married pairs (would've been cool if they were)), and I don't consider the Budapest subway bland by any measure, even with the original 81-717's gone, at least their legacy lives on with the 81-717.2K (the articulated trains on lines 2 and 4 are pretty nice too). And the TR's are actually a lot nicer than their equivalent counterparts in many other cities (especially when they have full body ad wraps).

I feel the same about the H5 and 81-717 as you do about the CLRV and T3. The 81-717's certainly have a better fate than the H5 given how ubiquitous they are across eastern Europe and how long their production line has kept going (1976 - 2014). I don't know if they'll still be around in 2070 though.

To be honest, I agree.

Reading about how the subway’s gotten more boring since the H cars were retired, I agree completely. Wow I feel old. I thought the subway was boring once it was only M and H cars.  That speaks to your point about vehicles that should have been but weren’t preserved.  That one hits near and dear to me.

If I somehow last until 2067 or 2070 which is within the realm of possibility, I’ll be firmly into GEEZER territory telling kids about how subway trains used to be red, cop cars were yellow, and one of the two TVs in the house was black and white.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Downsview 108 said:

It wasn't too bad. The first two times I went in the fall.


Loool those yellow cop cars.

I wonder if the TPS filled their quotas back then from unsuspecting NYC tourists. 🤣

 

You know, I didn’t even think of that. I could’ve managed it in October or maybe late September but definitely not summer.

I actually sunburned under a 23 W. compact fluorescent lightbulb once.  I was laid up at home after some surgery for a couple of weeks and I was feeling a lot better by the 10th day so I went down to the basement and carefully assembled a small cabinet to pass some time and try out a bit of returning to normal activity at my own speed to see how it went. And I got a sunburn.  I couldn’t figure out how the hell I got a sunburn in the basement in February so I started racking my brain to figure out what the UV source would’ve been.  The only thing I could think of was the compact fluorescent bulb I was standing a few feet from the whole afternoon while I slowly put together the cabinet. I went back downstairs, unscrewed the bulb, looked it over and sure enough, there were flakes missing from the phosphor coating inside the tube.  It was leaking ultraviolet where the phosphor was missing.  Check more, find they’re all defective like this, next errand was a visit to Canadian Tire to by incandescents and I reverted the whole house to good, old fashioned energy wasting hot tungsten filament lights that don’t generate UV.  I’ve been burning out the compact fluorescents in the porch lights since then.

By the way, do you have a copy of Supertramp’s BreakfyIn America album?  The picture on the back of the cover showing the band inside of a diner from behind the counter.  Look under the counter and there’s a small black and white portable Zenith TV on one of the shelves.  My family had the same Zenith in our kitchen when I was a kid.  The big RCA clunker you had to bang the top of in the living room was colour.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Wayside Observer said:

You know, I didn’t even think of that. I could’ve managed it in October or maybe late September but definitely not summer.

I actually sunburned under a 23 W. compact fluorescent lightbulb once.  I was laid up at home after some surgery for a couple of weeks and I was feeling a lot better by the 10th day so I went down to the basement and carefully assembled a small cabinet to pass some time and try out a bit of returning to normal activity at my own speed to see how it went. And I got a sunburn.  I couldn’t figure out how the hell I got a sunburn in the basement in February so I started racking my brain to figure out what the UV source would’ve been.  The only thing I could think of was the compact fluorescent bulb I was standing a few feet from the whole afternoon while I slowly put together the cabinet. I went back downstairs, unscrewed the bulb, looked it over and sure enough, there were flakes missing from the phosphor coating inside the tube.  It was leaking ultraviolet where the phosphor was missing.  Check more, find they’re all defective like this, next errand was a visit to Canadian Tire to by incandescents and I reverted the whole house to good, old fashioned energy wasting hot tungsten filament lights that don’t generate UV.  I’ve been burning out the compact fluorescents in the porch lights since then.

By the way, do you have a copy of Supertramp’s BreakfyIn America album?  The picture on the back of the cover showing the band inside of a diner from behind the counter.  Look under the counter and there’s a small black and white portable Zenith TV on one of the shelves.  My family had the same Zenith in our kitchen when I was a kid.  The big RCA clunker you had to bang the top of in the living room was colour.

Yeah those CFL bulbs were death bulbs. We only used those for a bit but I hate the colour they give off so we used incandescent and now we use LED bulbs tinted to look incandescent.

I used to have that album and it is my fave Supertramp LP. Those Zenith TVs were beasts, especially those console ones. last time I watched one was in 2007. We never had a console TV, we had a 19" Quasar bought new in 1978 as our main TV and for a short period (very short period. He took it away that same night because we were messing with it as kids 😂) my dad bought a black and white 9" Philips portable. That's the only time we had two TVs until that Quasar broke down for good 20 years ago. Ah, the days when two TVs were a luxury. LOL I even had a babysitter that owned a handheld TV back in '87 or so. He wouldn't even let me watch that, it was so precious to him LOL. TVs were baller in those days. 🤣🤣🤣

Now you can buy a 60" flat screen for a couple hundred bucks. That's if you want to invest that much in the CRAP that's on TV nowadays.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Downsview 108 said:

Those Zenith TVs were beasts, especially those console ones. last time I watched one was in 2007. We never had a console TV, we had a 19" Quasar bought new in 1978 as our main TV and for a short period (very short period. He took it away that same night because we were messing with it as kids 😂) my dad bought a black and white 9" Philips portable.

We had a B&W Westinghouse console TV in the late 50's until early 70's. In the 70's I had a small B&W Philco Ford portable in my room. Later on (mid 70's) we got a color TV for the living room, but it was not a console. I don't recall what brand it was.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't recall the brand name now. Started off with a B though. 

Whatever it was, we replaced that 1980's colour TV with a nice, new GE 27" TV sometime in the 1999's. It was almost exactly a day after the warranty expired it shit the bed. Back to the old TV! That thing never did die. The knob to turn it on and off did however. My Dad rigged up a new knob to control the sound, but, instead of using that to turn it on and off we just plugged into the outlet meant to control a lamp from a wall switch and use that wall switch to turn the TV on and off.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, captaintrolley said:

We had a B&W Westinghouse console TV in the late 50's until early 70's. In the 70's I had a small B&W Philco Ford portable in my room. Later on (mid 70's) we got a color TV for the living room, but it was not a console. I don't recall what brand it was.

Philco Ford? As in Ford Motor company?

2 minutes ago, M. Parsons said:

I don't recall the brand name now. Started off with a B though. 

Whatever it was, we replaced that 1980's colour TV with a nice, new GE 27" TV sometime in the 1999's. It was almost exactly a day after the warranty expired it shit the bed. Back to the old TV! That thing never did die. The knob to turn it on and off did however. My Dad rigged up a new knob to control the sound, but, instead of using that to turn it on and off we just plugged into the outlet meant to control a lamp from a wall switch and use that wall switch to turn the TV on and off.

LOL after a series of crappy Walmart TVs that broke down within one year to replace our Quasar (a 20" Memorex that would randomly go from 0-100 on the volume for some reason and a 24" Durabrand whose red and green guns partially died making the picture too blue until it died completely a year later) we settled on a similar 27" GE which was OK but died after about 8 years of use. You simply won't find a TV that will last 20+ years anymore.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Downsview 108 said:

Yeah those CFL bulbs were death bulbs. We only used those for a bit but I hate the colour they give off so we used incandescent and now we use LED bulbs tinted to look incandescent.

I used to have that album and it is my fave Supertramp LP. Those Zenith TVs were beasts, especially those console ones. last time I watched one was in 2007. We never had a console TV, we had a 19" Quasar bought new in 1978 as our main TV and for a short period (very short period. He took it away that same night because we were messing with it as kids 😂) my dad bought a black and white 9" Philips portable. That's the only time we had two TVs until that Quasar broke down for good 20 years ago. Ah, the days when two TVs were a luxury. LOL I even had a babysitter that owned a handheld TV back in '87 or so. He wouldn't even let me watch that, it was so precious to him LOL. TVs were baller in those days. 🤣🤣🤣

Now you can buy a 60" flat screen for a couple hundred bucks. That's if you want to invest that much in the CRAP that's on TV nowadays.

The only CFL bulbs we have are in the basement and living room. I actually quite like the colour (it's greenish blue) but I personally would not put it in my room. The ones in the living room are similar to what you'd get out of an incandescent.

We still use incandescent light bulbs everywhere else. I like the colour. They may produce heat but that's actually an advantage because my room gets so cold in the winter anyway (no space heater, the only heat source is a vent on the floor right underneath my window).

I may actually consider upgrading to 2700K LEDs to save money. However, I need to find a way to compensate for the heat loss. I may simply go for warm tinted CFLs instead since they produce heat as well but use less energy.

As for TVs, we kept a old Toshiba CRT in the living room until early 2012 or so. That broke and we replaced it with a huge 50 inch projection TV from the late 90s. We kept that until mid 2014 when we went to a 40 inch HDTV from around 2010 or so. Eventually in 2015, the TV broke on us and we had to go buy a new 1080p 50 inch TV. We kept that until 2018 when that broke and we finally upgraded to state of the art technology (the latest 55 inch curved Samsung 4K TV produced at the time). The TV's still going.

I did have two TVs in my room. I had the rear projection TV mentioned earlier moved into my room in mid 2014 when we got the new TV and got rid of it in mid 2016 to make room for a desk. My brother's room had a CRT (used to be in my room from 2012-2014) that eventually started dying. There was a huge green spot on the top left. The TV randomly started smoking at one point (my five year old brother was in the room at the time) so my dad had to go into the room as quickly as possible, unplug it, push it down the stairs, and quickly dispose of it. From that point, it was in our backyard until we threw it out.

So we've had flatscreen TVs only last for a few years. The CRTs did last longer but they did eventually break with the exception of the rear projection TV which had nothing wrong with it.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still have CRT TV in my room. It used to be in my parents room for god knows how long before we upgraded to a Sony flat screen. I use it only for any video game systems that don’t use an HDMI video connection, mainly from 1980’s up to mid 2000’s because the picture looks worse on non CRT TVs. I think it’s from the 1990’s, possibly mid or early 90’s, but my suspension is that it’s from the late 1990’s. I have been told that there was a console TV in our basement in storage and not working at some point, but I am 90 percent sure not it’s no longer here.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, M. Parsons said:

I don't recall the brand name now. Started off with a B though. 

Only brand I can think of is Baycrest, the Bay's own brand. I had a clock radio that was a Baycrest.

 

55 minutes ago, Downsview 108 said:

Philco Ford? As in Ford Motor company?

Maybe. Philco could be a contraction of Phillips Company. Maybe they amalgamated with Ford and made TV's I had a microwave that was a Litton Moffat in the 80's. All this was back in the days where stuff was made to last a decent amount of time, not like the crapola on the market nowadays.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, captaintrolley said:

Only brand I can think of is Baycrest, the Bay's own brand. I had a clock radio that was a Baycrest.

 

Maybe. Philco could be a contraction of Phillips Company. Maybe they amalgamated with Ford and made TV's I had a microwave that was a Litton Moffat in the 80's. All this was back in the days where stuff was made to last a decent amount of time, not like the crapola on the market nowadays.

We have a chest freezer from 1982 by Moffat and it's still going strong. In fact, it has outlived every other appliance in the house except the blender which is also from 1982. 😂😂

33 minutes ago, Matthew TTC 4120 said:

I still have CRT TV in my room. It used to be in my parents room for god knows how long before we upgraded to a Sony flat screen. I use it only for any video game systems that don’t use an HDMI video connection, mainly from 1980’s up to mid 2000’s because the picture looks worse on non CRT TVs. I think it’s from the 1990’s, possibly mid or early 90’s, but my suspension is that it’s from the late 1990’s. I have been told that there was a console TV in our basement in storage and not working at some point, but I am 90 percent sure not it’s no longer here.

I always say, CRTs have the best picture. Even crappy 240p YouTube videos look like HD on a CRT. I miss them but I don't miss the weight and size of them. It will be years before flat screens reach that level.

43 minutes ago, OC Transpo/STO Fan said:

The only CFL bulbs we have are in the basement and living room. I actually quite like the colour (it's greenish blue) but I personally would not put it in my room. The ones in the living room are similar to what you'd get out of an incandescent.

We still use incandescent light bulbs everywhere else. I like the colour. They may produce heat but that's actually an advantage because my room gets so cold in the winter anyway (no space heater, the only heat source is a vent on the floor right underneath my window).

I may actually consider upgrading to 2700K LEDs to save money. However, I need to find a way to compensate for the heat loss. I may simply go for warm tinted CFLs instead since they produce heat as well but use less energy.

As for TVs, we kept a old Toshiba CRT in the living room until early 2012 or so. That broke and we replaced it with a huge 50 inch projection TV from the late 90s. We kept that until mid 2014 when we went to a 40 inch HDTV from around 2010 or so. Eventually in 2015, the TV broke on us and we had to go buy a new 1080p 50 inch TV. We kept that until 2018 when that broke and we finally upgraded to state of the art technology (the latest 55 inch curved Samsung 4K TV produced at the time). The TV's still going.

I did have two TVs in my room. I had the rear projection TV mentioned earlier moved into my room in mid 2014 when we got the new TV and got rid of it in mid 2016 to make room for a desk. My brother's room had a CRT (used to be in my room from 2012-2014) that eventually started dying. There was a huge green spot on the top left. The TV randomly started smoking at one point (my five year old brother was in the room at the time) so my dad had to go into the room as quickly as possible, unplug it, push it down the stairs, and quickly dispose of it. From that point, it was in our backyard until we threw it out.

So we've had flatscreen TVs only last for a few years. The CRTs did last longer but they did eventually break with the exception of the rear projection TV which had nothing wrong with it.

 

We have one working CRT left and that's a 2003 JVC with the most beautiful picture you ever saw. I paid $30 for that and an old RCA DVD player which also still works. I don't use it because there really isn't anything for me to watch on DTV or satellite. I really don't watch TV anymore except for the odd vintage show on DejaVu.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, captaintrolley said:

Maybe. Philco could be a contraction of Phillips Company. Maybe they amalgamated with Ford and made TV's I had a microwave that was a Litton Moffat in the 80's. All this was back in the days where stuff was made to last a decent amount of time, not like the crapola on the market nowadays.

Philco - Philadelphia Dry Storage Battery Co.

I know two guys who used to work at Ford Philco Electronics.

Ah yes, Litton Industries microwave ovens.  Those had the most dangerous, easy to defeat door interlock I’ve ever seen on a microwave oven.  The other major defence contractor that I can think of that dabbled in consumer goods was General Dynamics which owned Stromberg Carlson for a while.  I would definitely not call the stuff they were making during General Dynamics’ ownership “military grade” though.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/11/2019 at 6:54 PM, Wayside Observer said:

The traffic, the crowding on the sidewalks, the crowding on the TTC, the general neglect and deterioration of everything, all that's a huge slide backwards from the Toronto of 30, 35+ years ago.

I hear that. And by that point, per certain sources, the city was already starting to be on the decline. What I'd really be interested in knowing about was the way Toronto was back in the 1950s and 1960s. Sure, every era has its bugs, and I don't want to run the risk of painting that era too positively, but as a city I really struggle to think how it could be much worse than it is today.

On 12/11/2019 at 6:54 PM, Wayside Observer said:

The CLRVs are a good example.  They're old and the TTC hasn't kept them up, and they've worn out.  Sure, there's some new streetcars to replace them but they city managed to seriously underpurchase the number that the place needs even taking into account the fact that the streetcar map hasn't change any since 1997 except for that short stretch of infill track on Queen's Quay between Spadina and Bathurst and the stub going down to the distillery.  And the modern Toronto mentality of the people living here is mind boggling to me anyways.

Agreed on both counts. Not that I really think that adding any streetcar lines would be meaningful unless they got their own right-of-way, and the motorist lobby will make sure that they don't, because a vehicle that can carry 5-6 people maximum and a vehicle that can carry 130+ people (CLRV) or even more should be given an equal playing field. :rolleyes:

In any other city, I'd happily select a trip by tram over a trip by the subway, but in Toronto there's no way you can decide that unless you have absolutely nowhere to be. Not that the experience would be comparable anyway, because anything that is half-way attractive or historical looking will get bulldozed in the name of more unchecked development anyway.

On 12/11/2019 at 6:54 PM, Wayside Observer said:

Nobody seemed to be interested in the idea of carpooling people who didn't drive or didn't have vehicles to or from somewhere on the TTC in Toronto or at a minimum the train station in Burlington which is not far at all from Guelph Line and the QEW.

Funny you should mention carpooling, because on Facebook there will be a few people who will mention that as a solution anytime someone complains about the lack of transit access up there. Which is all well and good if you know the right people and you're both coming from the same direction, but it seems to me like a bit of a cop out, not to mention a uniquely North American solution to the lack of public transit options to places. The guy I worked with on setting up the Halloween event was from the Kawartha Lakes area, and he would drive down and stay for a few days before driving back up. I somehow don't think he'd be able to come into the city to pick me up.

On 12/12/2019 at 2:48 AM, Streety McCarface said:

Old, and run down isn't necessarily bad, so long as it's kept well. Toronto is somewhere in the middle — a city of history and an aged aesthetic, while still succumbing to the blandness that is modernity. The CLRVs made Toronto extremely unique, even if they weren't as well kept as they should have been in their late years, seeing them gone, to me, only makes the city seem more and more modular and bland. 

"Old and run down" and "kept well" are not compatible. As much as I do love the CLRVs, they are old, and they are run down. Maintenance was in a bad way even 10 years ago, and it's only gotten worse as time has gone on.

On 12/12/2019 at 2:48 AM, Streety McCarface said:

Sheppard and Eglinton is where they should focus the majority of it.

Before I respond to this, I should preface these comments by saying that this will sound like a total contradiction in light of what I said above, but I don't think that "old" and "historic" can be used interchangably:

I hardly think that Sheppard or Eglinton are the most in need of gentrification, as much as I find much of Eglinton West to be hideous. I'd rather they focus on Dundas East, Gerrard East, or Queen East. It looks like that project has already begun (Dundas East is much more attractive now than it was at the start of the decade). Though I don't like the way gentrification currently goes (i.e. developers coming in and pricing the residents out of the neighbourhood).

What I'd like to see happen to Moss and Regent Parks is a renewal of their architecture and infrrastructure, demolishing of their most ratchet buildings, implementation of social programs, and a reintegration of the communities into the city. Right now, Moss Park is a pocket where horrible things go on every day, unchecked. That's not good for the health of the community, but it also wouldn't be good to just throw up a bunch of boxes and kick the poorest people living in the city out. Perhaps I'm too naive.

On 12/12/2019 at 2:48 AM, Streety McCarface said:

(though they royally fucked up by not saving any H series stock.

In a way, the lack of historical H-series cars sums up the historical vehicle situation rather well. Sure, I don't blame HCRR - they are, after all, only a volunteer run organization with limited funds, but the fact that a generation of cars can run in this city for damn near 50 years, and not one single specimen survives (and probably won't, either) is a scathing indictment on how we prioritize things in this city. Yeah, there's no money for it, I appreciate that, but me understanding what lead to the situation doesn't mean that it's still not a disgrace.

Maybe I should open my pocketbook, step up as a responsible citizen of our society. It will only take me a couple of million years to have enough money to buy one, store one, and restore one.

 

  • Like 3
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Downsview 108 said:

Philco Ford? As in Ford Motor company?

LOL after a series of crappy Walmart TVs that broke down within one year to replace our Quasar (a 20" Memorex that would randomly go from 0-100 on the volume for some reason and a 24" Durabrand whose red and green guns partially died making the picture too blue until it died completely a year later) we settled on a similar 27" GE which was OK but died after about 8 years of use. You simply won't find a TV that will last 20+ years anymore.

Yeah, Ford ended up buying Philco and ran it for a while.  All the Big 3 automotive companies dabbled in other consumer goods.  Frigidaire was a GM creation and Chrysler actually put their own name on appliances for a short time and Ford-Philco was a thing too.  My Hewlett Packard 8903B Audio Analyzer actually came by way of Ford-Philco.  And all three unloaded and spun those lines off too.  I guess the 1960s heydey of giant multiline conglomerates ended.

It's something to look at the price of a colour TV in the 1970s and earlier and run the numbers through an inflation calculator and then suffer massive sticker shock.  They were phenomenally expensive things.  No wonder people made payments on them.  Given the sheer cost involved in buying a colour TV, frequent replacement was not an option so they were made to be repairable and were repaired.  There's actually a TV repair shop around the corner from me still.  I have no idea how that place stays in business.  The other thing was that there was only one standard.  Compatible Colour NTSC.  It's not like recent years with NTSC -> HD -> You need 1080p "FULL HD" -> the 3D fad that lasted five minutes but sold a lot of TVs -> 4K -> marketing bullshit being prepared as 8K is starting to come on to the top end of the market where you have to buy a new TV because the technical standards have been getting changed every few years.

Even more insidious is the interconnect standards getting changed with different revision levels of HDMI and the HDCP copy protection DRM stuff.  If you aren't careful about how you replace one thing in your signal chain, you can end up in situations where you have to replace more things if not everything because of the incompatibilities introduced by the differing DRM schemes.  Also notice how the good old analogue fallbacks that you used to be able to use to get yourself out of a fire have been taken away?  Part of the standards that the manufacturers have agreed to included withdrawing inclusion of analogue audio and component HD from equipment so you don't find the wealth of connectors on the back of gear anymore.  Blu Ray players lost their Y, Pb, Pr and left and right audio connectors a long time ago and you won't find many of them on any compliant home theatre receiver anymore either.   It's very consumer unfriendly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Wayside Observer said:

Yeah, Ford ended up buying Philco and ran it for a while.  All the Big 3 automotive companies dabbled in other consumer goods.  Frigidaire was a GM creation and Chrysler actually put their own name on appliances for a short time and Ford-Philco was a thing too.  My Hewlett Packard 8903B Audio Analyzer actually came by way of Ford-Philco.  And all three unloaded and spun those lines off too.  I guess the 1960s heydey of giant multiline conglomerates ended.

It's something to look at the price of a colour TV in the 1970s and earlier and run the numbers through an inflation calculator and then suffer massive sticker shock.  They were phenomenally expensive things.  No wonder people made payments on them.  Given the sheer cost involved in buying a colour TV, frequent replacement was not an option so they were made to be repairable and were repaired.  There's actually a TV repair shop around the corner from me still.  I have no idea how that place stays in business.  The other thing was that there was only one standard.  Compatible Colour NTSC.  It's not like recent years with NTSC -> HD -> You need 1080p "FULL HD" -> the 3D fad that lasted five minutes but sold a lot of TVs -> 4K -> marketing bullshit being prepared as 8K is starting to come on to the top end of the market where you have to buy a new TV because the technical standards have been getting changed every few years.

Even more insidious is the interconnect standards getting changed with different revision levels of HDMI and the HDCP copy protection DRM stuff.  If you aren't careful about how you replace one thing in your signal chain, you can end up in situations where you have to replace more things if not everything because of the incompatibilities introduced by the differing DRM schemes.  Also notice how the good old analogue fallbacks that you used to be able to use to get yourself out of a fire have been taken away?  Part of the standards that the manufacturers have agreed to included withdrawing inclusion of analogue audio and component HD from equipment so you don't find the wealth of connectors on the back of gear anymore.  Blu Ray players lost their Y, Pb, Pr and left and right audio connectors a long time ago and you won't find many of them on any compliant home theatre receiver anymore either.   It's very consumer unfriendly.

LOL talk about diversifying. I assume their job was to just put their name on the appliances that were all coming from the same factory.

You're right about the price of color TV. Makes sense as many shows even in the 70s had kinescopes in B&W. I know the first episode of the Britcom "Are You Being Served" was in B&W. There are also kinescopes of Sesame Street in B&W. The current technology is another reason why I think CRT has an advantage. It didn't matter what size you buy, the resolution stays relatively the same depending on whether it is PAL or NTSC. Nowadays, your 1080p TV and Blu Ray DVDs are on their way out. I presume 4K will be out by the 30s. 8K by the 40s. 12K by the 50s. And it will go on and on and on. Nice moneymaking racket to be honest. When I started uploading my old MiniDV videos I couldn't believe how crappy they look and that's taking into account YouTube's BS compression. DVD quality, which I used to be amazed by in the early 2000s looks like garbage today, especially on a 1080p monitor. I am glad there's nothing to watch on TV so I don't have to waste money on that. 

I miss when TV's, DVD players and etc had more connectors. I have a 40" 1080p TV and it only has component (which I'm lucky it does) and 2 HDMI ports. I don't remember if it even has RCA video. IT only has 2 RCA audio outs as well! WTF?! And don't get me started on those revisions. Again, another money making racket to sucker those who want the latets and greatest. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...