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Tom1122   

A combined LOL/FY moment from today:

At my job at Home Depot, after helping get 56 spruce trees for a customer's order. I helped straighten out the remaining trees. I found a $10 bill on the ground by the trees and remarked that this was the closest I've seen to money growing on trees!

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Tom1122   

Yesterday I saw a digital sign by Leslie at the plaza where the Home Depot I work at is that said the date was August 10, 2000 at 9:50 am. (It was after 10 pm on May 17, 2017!)

The day before, it also said the date was August of 2000!

Interestingly enough the other side of the sign displayed the correct time and date.

I do believe that many of us wish we could go back to that time and fan.

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Would love to go back to 2000 and try to save the ETS trolley system with a slightly different strategy knowing what we know now.

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Tom1122   

Today driving through the west side of Washington DC, PCCstreetcar4549 and I saw a street called "Frying Pan Road"

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PCC Guy   

I was doing some reading on unusual incidents on real railways, and found a couple that were really funny.

The first one happened during a labour strike on British Rail in the 1920s. The source of this tale is a book called "Railway's Strangest Journeys" by Tom Quinn.

During the General Strike, volunteer firemen, drivers, porters and guards were taken on and in general they made a thoroughly bad job of running those industries that had come to a halt as a result of the walkout. On the railway most of the volunteers were from well-off backgrounds and they had no experience of hard manual work of any kind. Many were lucky enough to have private incomes as they were, to be frank, fit for no kind of employment. The railway were particularly badly afflicted with kind of volunteer, but their presence led to one or two amusing incidents. A good example occurred on a suburban train that left London and then had a long steep climb. It made it to the top of the incline by the narrowest of margins and the volunteer guard ran to the front of the train to discuss their narrow escape with the driver.


“My word,” said the driver, as the volunteer guard reached the footplate, “I thought we’d never make it to the top of that hill,”
“Yes,” said the volunteer guard, “and you have me to thank for the fact that we didn’t roll backwards. Thank goodness I screwed the brake down hard!”

The other event happened in South Africa in the 1880s.

South Africa’s most famous trained baboon, one which always remained faithful to his master, was "Jack the Signalman" from Uitenhage.



James Edwin Wide, a guard on the old Cape Government Railways, lost both legs at the knee in a railway accident near Kleinpoort in the Eastern Cape. Thus crippled in 1877, he took a post as signalman at Uitenhage station.

About four years later Wide was in the Uitenhage market place when an ox-wagon came in with a large young baboon acting as "voorloper." The owner told Wide that the baboon learned quickly and was unusually intelligent. This gave Wide an idea. His cottage was half a mile from the signal box and he had made himself a light trolley propelled by hand apparatus. Wide decided to buy the baboon so that it could push or pull the trolley.

Jack the baboon soon mastered this simple task. Moreover, he learned to lift the light trolley on and off the railway track. Wide kept and important key in his signal box. It unlocked the points that enabled locomotive drivers to reach the coal-sheds. Whenever a driver wanted it, he gave four blasts on his whistle and Wide would trotter out on his crutches and hold up the key. 

Jack watched this performance for a few days, then raced out with the key as soon as he heard the four blasts. Thereafter it became one of his duties.
Finally the time came when Wide was able to entrust the signal levers to the baboon. Wide would hold up one or two fingers and Jack would then pull the correct lever. He always looked at his master for confirmation. In the end, the baboon needed no instructions from his master. Jack really knew which lever to operate for each approaching train, and caught the various offerings thrown to him by passengers.

He knew the difference between the "home" and "distant" signals, and also the engine whistles; and although he was always under the eye of his master, he never made a mistake or required telling twice. Jack was one of the sights of Uitenhage for many years, and his astonishing feats of intelligence was the wonder of all who witnessed them. Jack died in 1890 after developing tuberculosis.

Further reading on this delightful enigma here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_(chacma_baboon)

 

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On 7/28/2017 at 7:41 PM, Tom1122 said:

Today driving through the west side of Washington DC, PCCstreetcar4549 and I saw a street called "Frying Pan Road"

Near me here in Chester, SC is a street named "Why Me Lord" Street.

 

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Tom1122   

If you're a fan of the Vinyl Café, you'll like this:

Yesterday, at my mom's ice cream store, we had a cake order with the message to be written on a cake: "Happy birthday Morley". The person picking up the cake was Stephanie!

 

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