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Found 4 results

  1. Ontario is providing up to $13 million to Brampton and York Region to buy 14 electric buses and four charging systems over the next 2 years. Ontario's strategy to cut greenhouse gas pollution to 15 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020, 37 per cent by 2030 and 80 per cent by 2050. SOURCE: Government of Ontario Climate Change Action Plan
  2. MAX BRT

    DC Circulator

    More than half of the fleet’s 49 vehicles are ready for retirement after ten year’s service. 13 New XDE40s are ready to replace the oldest of those. Later on? Electric buses will be coming, by the sound of it. Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/express/wp/2015/05/13/new-dc-circulator-buses-will-have-usb-ports-and-better-air-conditioning/ "In the long run, the DC Circulator will transition to fully electric buses, Handsfield says. They are more expensive, but they make up their cost in fuel savings, he says. “They are better for the environment and quiet enough that you can hear what the person next to you is saying,” he says. So what’s the downside? The electric buses can only go about 80 miles on a full charge, while diesel buses can travel roughly 350 miles on a full tank, says David Warren, director of sustainable transportation at New Flyer, which makes both kinds of buses. As a result, electric buses have to “power up” between routes, pausing to charge at electric gantries, which look like low-slung street lights. Before electric buses can be deployed for the Circulator fleet, D.C. has to set up mobile charging stations and a garage for overnight charging, Handsfield says. “It’s a logistical challenge, but we think it’s worth it,” he says.
  3. http://www.metro-mag...t-zeps-bus.aspx Ben Franklin Transit (BFT)is working with Southern California-based Complete Coach Works (CCW) to develop an all-electric remanufactured transit bus that has the capability of going more than 100 miles. Ben Franklin Transit’s bus, when completed, will have all electrical components, auxiliary wiring, seats, air conditioning systems and flooring replaced with high quality new parts. The all-electric drive system, motor, controller and advanced Li-ion battery packs will be installed, as will a new, energy efficient air conditioning system. The remanufacturing process is so detailed and complete that the bus will be issued a new title and current year registration. Because CCW made a point to source as many U.S. parts and components as possible, the bus is “Buy America” compliant. Ben Franklin Transit, in collaboration with CCW, evaluated the bus route that will benefit the most from the deployment of the electric transit bus. Ben Franklin Transit Route 23/26 is currently a good fit for this all-electric transit bus. Because of frequent stops within a total eight-mile loop and low average speed, the route provides ideal conditions for the regenerative braking-enabled ZEPS bus. For more information, An earlier 2012 article on the remanufactured electric bus from CCW is here: http://www.metro-mag...ulsion-bus.aspx Complete Coach Works (CCW) debuted its new zero-emission propulsion system (ZEPS) on a remanufactured all-electric transit bus at the 2012 Alternative Clean Transportation Expo in Long Beach, Calif., in mid-May. The standard 40-foot transit bus is expected to have a range of 120 to 150 miles, which represents a major move towards the range of a diesel bus, says Macy Neshati, VP, sales and marketing for CCW, adding that with that range the bus will meet the route profile of the vast majority of transit systems. The ZEPS system features a highly integrated design with fewer parts for convenient and fast installation; an integrated controller, with built-in energy management functions; computer-controlled synchronous clutch for long life; and regenerative braking capability all within a compact design, ideal for retrofit purposes. The remanufactured bus, built to like-new condition, includes numerous updates, including: Light weight composite subfloors and brand new flooring All new multiplex system and all new wiring Completely remanufactured suspension and brake system with all moving and wear items replaced with new The differential is remanufactured to OEM specifications A like-new interior with new seat upholstery, and side and ceiling panels refinished to the transit systems color schemes A redesigned dash featuring a touch screen energy monitoring system Other retrofit details include a remanufactured chassis frame and structure to like-new condition and the application of high-quality paint and graphics, as well as new tires and wheels, rebuilt windows, door systems and wheelchair ramps. "We are striving for a price point of of roughly $475,000 to $500,000 for The fully rehabbed bus with the ZEPS drive, half of what a new electric bus would cost," said Neshati.
  4. Metro takes extra-long electric bus for test drive on the Orange Line http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-electric-bus-20141227-story.html Gary Spivack, division transportation manager for Metro, said the testing of the articulated electric bus was positive; operators enjoyed driving the bus based on the smooth ride and quiet inside, and passengers enjoyed being in the bus, he said. "It was a successful test," Spivack said. "It's striking in terms of its appearance." He said Metro hasn't made up its mind about ordering the 60-foot bus, saying range is a paramount issue when it comes to any electric bus. "We need something that goes 250 miles a day," Spivack said. The cost for the electric articulated bus is about $1.2 million, Riley said. In contrast, a comparable natural-gas articulated bus sells for $800,000. . . . The bus runs on eight lithium iron phosphate battery modules, four to a side, that provide enough charge for more than 170 miles, Holtz said. In lab tests, the batteries have a life cycle of about 27 years, about twice the life span of an average bus, he said. The bus can hold up to 120 passengers. The zero-emission bus, named the Lancaster after its birthplace at the BYD manufacturing facility, was unveiled in October at the American Public Transportation Assn. Expo in Houston. Its next big appearance was on the Orange Line, where Holtz said the bus was praised for its quietness.
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