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MAX BRT

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  1. CDTA (Albany, NY) rolls out electric Xcelsiors. https://www.saratogian.com/news/cdta-rolls-out-electric-buses/article_54aa0b1e-6747-56bc-acb4-2e1464c5067b.html Some good info here! (quote) CDTA installed four Siemens direct current depot chargers, at its 110 Watervliet Ave. facility. High efficiency LED lighting was installed in each of the charging stations to enhance safety measures. CDTA worked with National Grid and Sage Engineering to design appropriate upgrades of the electrical capacity at CDTA headquarters. Kasselman Electric was awarded a contract to make sure CDTA has the necessary electrical upgrades to support the buses. “We know the transition to electric vehicles can be daunting for many fleet owners, especially when it comes to navigating the charging infrastructure and deployment. As the utility, we are committed to helping our customers overcome that barrier to EV adoption. The Virtual Lab with CDTA gives us the opportunity to explore this process and work hand-in-hand with our customer as they make the transition to cleaner fuels. All of this would not be possible without the forward-thinking of partners like CDTA and New York State,” Laurie Poltynski, Regional Executive Director for National Grid remarked. Each charger weighs 5,200 pounds and contains 20 times the amount of charging capacity compared to most common electric vehicle chargers. They also have a built-in website that tracks the electric energy that is transferred to the 42 batteries contained in each bus. Each bus costs $900,000, each charger costs $121,000. Training and tools needed for maintenance cost close to $200,000, bringing the total cost of the pilot project to $3.9 million.(unquote)
  2. Ballard Power continues to work on powering buses, maybe especially coach buses that travel long highway miles. The cost of hydrogen infrastructure has been one of the big barriers-- as it was in the fuel cell buses in British Columbia. And they haven't been able to compete very well with the battery bus revolution. I just looked and BLDP stock has more than doubled in the last 6 months. One of their markets is buses in China--along with a few in the US (as noted in the first post in this thread). This source shows that there are right now 42 Fuel cell buses in operation in California. source: https://cafcp.org/by_the_numbers
  3. Roamer, you have created a helluva database for these accidents. Thank you for your efforts! I would love to see a journalist write a long story about this problem and how it is occurring all over and needs to be addressed.
  4. Everett Transit is going to add a couple more Proterra buses. I've read a lot of articles about local transit agencies adding electric buses, but this one (from heraldnet.com) stands out for extra details. Highly recommended if you are interested in the reality of electric buses! Source: https://www.heraldnet.com/news/everett-transit-set-to-expand-electric-buses-cut-fuel-costs/ "A fall protection system was needed so technicians can operate safely on the electric buses’ roofs, whereas other buses don’t need that access, Hingson said. Personal protective equipment was bought for the technicians so they could work with the high-voltage vehicles. Bus operators receive two hours to familiarize themselves with the new buses."
  5. This article says that Santa Cruz Metro is getting Proterra and Gillig electric buses. No mention of BYD. https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/2019/10/09/metro-receives-training-on-zero-emission-buses/
  6. CT goes back to the future with transit-oriented development By Tom Condon, CTMirror.org Updated 11:45 am EDT, Monday, July 29, 2019 New Britain — The decades after World War II were unkind to many Connecticut cities, New Britain among them. The Hardware City lost jobs, was carved up by highways and saw residents depart for the suburbs. Its once bustling downtown began to look desolate, almost like an archeological site. Not anymore. Downtown New Britain is steadily coming back. Streets have been revamped and redesigned (with roundabouts and bike lanes), a downtown park has been spiffed up, and historic buildings are being refurbished for housing and other uses. A new development, two five-story buildings with about 160 residential units and 20,000 square feet of retail space, is under construction. “More downtown buildings have been sold in the last two years than in the last 20 years,” said longtime city development director Bill Carroll, a New Britain native. “It’s a beautiful thing to see What’s driving this revival? The bus. Read more: https://www.newstimes.com/local/article/CT-goes-back-to-the-future-with-transit-oriented-14193057.php
  7. Four new Proterra's rolled out in Wichita, Kansas! https://www.kansas.com/news/politics-government/article238315478.html
  8. NJ Transit funding and procurement update at NJ.com: Your gas tax will pay for NJ Transit’s $500M shopping list —including electric buses Posted Dec 12, 9:03 AM https://www.nj.com/traffic/2019/12/your-gas-tax-will-pay-for-nj-transits-500m-shopping-list-including-electric-buses.html
  9. Proterra has redesigned their website since I was there last. Lots of marketing in blog post format. Good info! This one about the composite bus bodies caught my eye. They are built in Rhode Island and at a wind turbine plant in Newton, Iowa. As Electric Buses Scale, Composite Bus Production Adds To American Manufacturing Jobs May 2, 2019 https://www.proterra.com/as-electric-buses-scale-composite-bus-production-adds-to-american-manufacturing-jobs/
  10. I always have a soft spot for Gillig shorties, or any 35 foot or 29 foot bus. Rare buses all around! Agree with you about Xcelsiors. I admire those buses.
  11. Electric Buses in America Lessons from Cities Pioneering Clean Transportation A report created by U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Environment America Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group Written by Matt Casale, U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Morgan Folger, Environment America Research & Policy Center and James Horrox, Frontier Group Download the report here: https://uspirg.org/feature/usp/electric-buses-america
  12. Electric Buses in America Lessons from Cities Pioneering Clean Transportation A report created by U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Environment America Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group Written by Matt Casale, U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Morgan Folger, Environment America Research & Policy Center and James Horrox, Frontier Group Download the report here: https://uspirg.org/feature/usp/electric-buses-america The report features 6 case studies of electric bus pilots: 4 successful, 1 fail and 1 mixed.
  13. Electric Buses in America Lessons from Cities Pioneering Clean Transportation A report created by U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Environment America Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group Written by Matt Casale, U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Morgan Folger, Environment America Research & Policy Center and James Horrox, Frontier Group download the report here: https://uspirg.org/feature/usp/electric-buses-america The report features 6 case studies of electric bus pilots: 4 successful, 1 fail and 1 mixed.
  14. 594 kWh, that is a huge battery!
  15. The Nissan Leaf EV allows coasting, but you have to switch it manually into neutral to do that. I think it is designed that way, coasting IS an option but some OEMs engineer things to make it easier than others do. I suspect you can coast in the BMW i3 too, but you have to know how to switch to that mode. Should be the same with buses. The bus driver's thinking that the electric bus does not require a change in driving style is curious. Everything I know about EVs is that there is a lot to learn to maximize smoothness and the efficiency potential of the regenerative braking. Other TA's and drivers have said that. For example, knowing how to coast and learn how to use the brakes as smoothly as possible. Regen braking (friction brakes are also part of the braking experience) has a different feel and its easy to waste a lot of battery power and drive less smoothly than possible. As you point out, the bite of the regen braking is programmable and can be made stronger or weaker.
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