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Jared Kam

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  1. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Thanks for posting this - I don't have an answer other than yes in the 200-series buses there are different seats based on what part of the series the bus is from. And the variety ranges from the Recaro Ergo M to the USSC Evolution seat to the USSC Q91 - and still it seems that they are choosing different operator seats for the latest Xcelsior buses (Recaro) vs. the 700-series Gilligs (USSC Q91). Honestly I am baffled by their use of multiple driver seat manufacturers - commonality leads to efficiency. Besides, drivers would be able to get used to one type of seat vs. being unsure from day to day what type of seat they would get.
  2. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    So does this mean that the remaining 1999 D60LF's are fully retired now that there are 30 Xcelsior buses that have replaced them?
  3. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Wow that's rather interesting...the camera placement definitely gives it away. Wonder if the darker tint bus was renumbered. Keep us posted on what you find out...
  4. Jared Kam

    Los Angeles MTA

    Glad they are going back to Alcoa polished rims - they just look sharp with the silver.
  5. Jared Kam

    Portland TriMet

    Hey northwesterner, my responses below: Slow doors - certainly every agency who has these Vapor systems are dealing with the same struggles. I've seen the same issues in Honolulu as I have here in Portland with those Vapor doors. If the sonar sensors were more sensitive then it would be a lot better, but the added sensitivity would probably lead to false activations of the door latch. TriMet's spec is particularly challenging when it comes to door speed as the front doors are also attached to the interlock, but it seems like the closing of the rear doors are slower on these than their previous Gilligs. Sensitive Edge - You would think so, but it doesn't appear to be the case - my guess is that maybe the Vapor system has replaced this feature? In the case that I tried, the bus was off, and usually you can either put pressure on (aka kick) the back doors with the green light on and that would cause the doors to open. Now the system just beeps at you and doesn't open the doors. Now that I am thinking out loud, either the edge has gone from a sensor to open the doors to a sensor to sound an alarm, but the doors remain closed with the bus turned off. You can pry the rubber open or kick the door, and nothing besides the beeping seemed to happen. But the beeping happens, which means maybe that sensitive edge has a different function. Interlock - "They want a conscious action from the driver to deactivate the interlock - doors closed, brake application - of a certain psi - then push the accelerator." This is the case, but in this bus, the brake pedal was applied, then released, and when the gas pedal was applied the bus sort of "dragged" to start...as though it was a sticky caliper in the back. The interlock still functions the same as the rest of their Gilligs, but that dragging was unique to this bus (and potentially just this bus).
  6. Jared Kam

    Portland TriMet

    Overall the 3900's are largely similar to the rest of the Gilligs that they have been ordering as of late. Differences include: Pre-installed driver barrier with a smaller sliding window than the demo units had. Electric front and rear exit doors (they have done away with the active strip on the door edge which means that when the doors are closed, they cannot be opened as in the previous models where you could pry the rubber and open the door - wait to see the first driver who gets locked out of a bus because of this). They are still really slow which hopefully TriMet can address. Reconfigured warning lights at the top light bar, moving the Brake, Stop Request, and Kneel lights to the bottom right side of the bar. I've only been on 3915 - this bus had an odd issue where the rear wheels would stick when the interlock was released. You'd hear the engine starting up and the brakes in the rear would be holding the bus still - it was strange. That and the bus had a loose HVAC switch, so that it got spun around and off and on were reversed (it could be rotated in its place - from what I could tell this was addressed and corrected yesterday). Seemed like the transmission was allowing the bus to accelerate quicker - there was no noticeable reduction in torque from first to second that you hear and feel on the previous generations.
  7. Jared Kam

    Portland TriMet

    The 3900's are on the road! I'm off to try to catch one 🙂
  8. Jared Kam

    Portland TriMet

    Any word on when the 3900's will be placed on the road?
  9. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Geez I had to read that a few times - 8 buses total? Seems like a pretty small order...to replace the last 300's still? 720-728? I think it's about time we start seeing some big orders coming in, namely to replace 803-835 (since 801 and 802 are refurbished I would imagine they will justify holding onto them longer) and to start replacing the first rainbow buses (501-555; 835-853). I imagine the last 880's will replace the remaining 2000 New Flyer D60LF's, or will they hold onto those even longer? I know TheBus is known for having one of the best maintenance programs according to Cummins, but they are playing an interesting game of "let's see how long we can keep these buses on the road". Most agencies will auction their buses off to other non-government bus industries (think ART in Anaheim) to squeeze the last few years of regular service life out of retired buses...guessing that TheBus is just continuing to use these buses for their own benefit until they die.
  10. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    I'm certain that this would be insurance rather than warranty, though I am sure that both could cover the replacement if needed. Would definitely be pretty neat to see this bus return with a new front cap and a white LED destination sign. But at nearly 15 years old I am near certain this unit will be scrapped and they will apply the insurance payment toward a new Gillig bus. Speaking of new Gilligs, any word on new 40' buses? The 700 series Gilligs were particularly underwhelming in terms of the number of buses ordered - they have a bunch of 800's that appear to be ready for retirement. I like the new Gillig specs with the skylight roof hatches, text at the front and rear stepwells, etc. - seems like TheBus is landing on something they can stick to after that batch of anomaly hybrid models (I think 8 large diameter rear brake lights are a little much lol). Also excited to see the new 880's coming in (btw who came up with this numbering sequence...my hope was that they would drop the leading 8 once the double digit buses retired). With rail coming in it's clear that buses have taken a back seat in terms of capital spending, but the need is only getting greater. Pretending that any of it makes sense has been working for me so far.
  11. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    I'd say these are pretty big repairs...
  12. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Awesome find, Alika! Looking forward to more articulated buses - think that they need to continue to order just artics until they can fill all the City and Country Express runs with 60' buses.
  13. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Read the article above. Sad to see one of these great buses retire early. I don't know that there's any other fleet that has been as well received by drivers.
  14. Jared Kam

    The Bus (Honolulu, HI)

    Is there any chance that these could be electric XE60's? I know TheBus has been eyeing electric buses for a bit...
  15. Jared Kam

    Denver RTD

    How have the BYD buses been holding up? Looks like they are all in service... Great pics - thanks for sharing!
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