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anonymous guy

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  1. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    If I recall correctly, weren't the SG-310s tuned to city speeds compared to the fully capable SG-220 coaches?
  2. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Snooping around the wiki, it was mentioned that Metro specified HybriDrive Series-ER for tunnel coach operation. Seeing as how they abandoned trying to operate their Xcelsior coaches in the tunnel relatively early on, I guess that experiment didn't go over too well.
  3. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    From what I recall, there was a workaround that allowed New Flyer to squeeze a little extra power out of the rear electric axle. Not a satisfactory solution for the performance woes, but it was all that could be offered by the manufacturer unless there was a high enough demand to manufacture a 60ft trolley with two powered axles. It was also rumored that New Flyer plans to discontinue manufacturing of XT coaches after fulfilling their current SF MUNI order, per the STB post - so unfortunately it looks like a pipe dream, alongside the failing streetcar project.
  4. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    It looks like the D60LFs were disposed of quickly. I'm holding out hope that somehow one of the D60s gets preserved by MEHVA.
  5. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Spotted a few D60s sitting around Ryerson's parking lot. Any idea what's going on with those coaches?
  6. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    I found out the other day that the Bombardier T1 operated by TTC makes sounds similar to the Breda coaches in electric mode. After braking, the train makes that familiar "rumble" as it waits idle. As the train accelerates, you hear another familiar electric motor noise shared with the Breda: If the Breda used an electric propulsion system similar to the ones used on rail cars, it may explain why those coaches felt so powerful operating in electric mode. Makes sense since manufacturing rolling stock was the bread and butter of Breda.
  7. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Ah, I assumed that the little concrete box structure in the upper level with the "garage door" was a former customer service booth. It now has an Orca TVM stationed in front of it.
  8. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Coffee carts...now that's a throwback. If I recall correctly, there also was a customer service desk on the upper platform, long since unused. In Westlake Station, there are old customer service/ticket booths hastily covered up with cardboard boxes. They appear to be offices/rest areas for the transit security employees now. I've also wondered what's behind the covered up doors that used to lead to the (now gone) lower level of the Westlake Center mall.
  9. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    With the demise of Convention Place Station, less effort would be made in upkeep, I would presume. The ceramic tile mural facing the Paramount no longer gets graffiti scrubbed off - instead they try to buff everything with a uniform coat of primer grey paint (which attracts even more graffiti). The grey paint actually makes the old tunnel poetry more visible. One of the walls recounts the feelings of electric hum converting to diesel rumble as a coach leaves the station, as they wait for the route 253. Meanwhile, they never really brought back Convention Place to its old glory after the light rail conversion, as the water fountains were never re-activated.
  10. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    I wonder if Intersection was responsible for those Washington Lottery ad wraps from several years back. They had jackpot numbers on the side, which would be updated daily based on the value that day. A little more labor intensive to continually have to update the numbers, but neat nonetheless.
  11. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    End of an era. How much longer will the D40LFs have? They still see plenty of service, especially during trolley outages.
  12. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Some of the coaches looked like they were halfway in the process of being converted into motorhomes, then whoever started the process gave up. Others look like they were parted out, possibly to help in that conversion process. It's also neat how the old teal color is coming through the poor paint job. If MEHVA found a reason to maintain a Gillig Phantom, they should also have a reason to keep one of the D60s. I always felt like the spirit behind MEHVA was to retain at least one kind of coach type used during metropolitan Seattle's bus history. For example, they retained a MAN SG220, but declined to retain a SG310 or a SGT310 because the SG220 represented that particular fleet type. Not retaining a D60 seems like a missing gap in MEHVA's historical roster.
  13. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    On another note, KOMO ran a news story about a property owner with an illegal dump in Renton: http://komonews.com/news/local/former-cop-faces-jail-time-for-10-acre-property-deemed-hazardou-by-king-county Unfortunately the news story doesn't have video from the broadcast, nor was it captured on the page's image gallery - but when the story was aired, the dump had more than a few rotting MAN Americana shells from KC Metro lying around.
  14. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    As a customer, riding in a 2300 felt "premium." The high floor allowed the passenger to have a raised vantage point looking outside. Riding on a raised floor always felt more solid, compared to the modern low floors that seem to wear down, rattle, and loosen up much quicker. This particular fleet type was packed with lots of forward facing seats, something I feel most riders prefer. They were fitted with comfortable high-back, well supported vinyl seats, standard with King County coaches from the mid-90's onward. Some of the downsides of having too many forward facing seats can be with crush capacity. The aisles felt claustrophobic for any standing passenger, and getting around others (especially people with backpacks or rolling luggage) to either of the exit doors was a task. The lack of AC during the summer months would pose a problem as well. During the cooler summer days, running the coach with all of the windows open would suffice - but as the temperature rose it could feel like a sauna. Add in a full coach of people packed in like sardines and everyone would be stewing. In terms of power, these things were slugs off acceleration, but did fine on the freeways. On the city streets, neighbors would often complain of how loud these coaches were on take off, and how these weighty coaches would shake the sidewalks. They also did a number on wearing down the roads as well. On the cons of a high floor, it always felt painfully slow for the D60 to deploy its wheelchair lift - especially in comparison to the swift loading of a wheelchair ramp on the newer coaches. As a rider, I will miss them - but I could see why others would be fine seeing them go.
  15. anonymous guy

    King County Metro - Seattle, Washington

    Sounds like the D60LFs are on their last legs with 2883 being a sole survivor. And if a post from the NW Bus Fans Facebook page is to be believed, MEHVA may not be retaining a 2300 for their fleet?
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