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PCC Guy

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Everything posted by PCC Guy

  1. During quarantine, before I started going to work, I found I had a decent amount of time to update my map of Yorkland. So here it is, one of the biggest upgrades I've made to it so far. Something else I wanted to have ready by this point is a document briefly outlining the key features, facts, and figures of the country, but this is to be shelved indefinitely. In the interim, here is the newest export: https://www.dropbox.com/s/bpjp8mzdrzscujv/yorkland may 2020.png?dl=0 The area of the country is (presently) 252,852.9389 sq km, making it the 77th largest country in the world. It's a unitary republic with a population of about 38 million, give or take. Feedback appreciated!
  2. Does anyone have any experience with the Canon SL3? I've seen reviews of it around and by all accounts it seems to be a good camera and relatively affordable for me, but I don't know personally know anyone in the community who has used it and whether it's the most optimal for bus shooting. Any feedback would be appreciated.
  3. What's the deal with the snow?? Back in 2016 I was incredulous that it snowed on May 7 and thought that it would be the #1 record for such a thing happening to me personally that I would tell everyone about in the future. Well, that record has been unseated today by the monstrosity outside. This entire year is backwards.
  4. Nope, just green triangle for now. Between carrying around double the weight on my feet, and the constant lifting of heavy objects, I am probably going to be more in shape by the time I finish at this job than I ever have been in my life!
  5. https://thehill.com/opinion/healthcare/495833-how-to-open-society-using-medical-science-and-logic
  6. You are assuming that every person who has contracted the virus is being caught, which is nowhere close to being the case. That's why you have to be so careful about the doomers who act like the sky is falling every time there is an increase in reported cases - expanding our testing capabilities enables us to find people who are either asymptomatic or have such mild symptoms that they don't seek out medical help, so the data is skewed, in many places, toward the critical cases. A much more helpful metric for how this crisis is going is the hospitalization and death rate - if 8000 people test positive, but all of them kick the virus without a doctor so much as lifting a finger, it is much less concerning than 800 people being hospitalized. https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2020/04/26/are-the-silent-spreaders-driving-covid-19-mounting-evidence-points-to-asymptomatic-cases.html Here in Ontario we are still not testing asymptomatic people, so it should come as no surprise that the death rate seems much higher than it actually is. "PHO is not currently recommending routine testing of asymptomatic persons for COVID-19 outside of those recommended in Ministry guidance, or as directed by the public health unit for public health investigation. Please note that given an incubation period of up to 14 days for COVID-19 disease after exposure, a negative PCR test result in an asymptomatic person should not be used to rule out disease." https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/laboratory-services/test-information-index/wuhan-novel-coronavirus https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.14.20062463v2
  7. These days, I spend more time walking around in steel toed shoes at work than I do in regular shoes. The action of being able to walk without being considerably weighed down feels surreal.
  8. I feel like all of life is like a shitty B movie nowadays. https://www.forbes.com/sites/allenelizabeth/2020/05/01/this-beach-in-spain-was-sprayed-with-bleach-to-kill-covid-19/#7060e5386525
  9. https://thehill.com/opinion/healthcare/494034-the-data-are-in-stop-the-panic-and-end-the-total-isolation?amp
  10. Ignoring, for a second, the general unlikeliness of COVID-19 being 'completely' over for the foreseeable future (other criteria will have to be explored to restart all the world in a meaningful way, never mind charters), I highly doubt the TTC would be dumb enough to let a charter run while there is a significant possibility of community spread, or that there's going to be any great percentage of people who are going to have enough cash going around to pay the TTC's exorbitant charter rates.
  11. NEWMAN TRANSIT NEWS MAY 3, 2020 Effective May 4, 2020, the government of Yorkland will be restoring society in a significant way following its shut down due to the coronavirus outbreak. The country saw the signs early and took steps to prevent a full-scale crisis from breaking out. In the end, their efforts appear to have resulted in effectively being able to contain the virus, as widespread testing (over 100,000 every day for the last month) has only found 2440 cases to date, with no new cases reported since April 17. Though originally the plan was to begin reopening the country in stages, the complete lack of news cases for more than two weeks has been taken as a positive indication, and the bulk of the country will be reopening at once. Borders will remain closed to foreigners, and will progressively reopen to specific countries only as the virus' spread is brought under control. Any visitors or nationals coming from foreign lands will be subjected to mandatory testing, and will be quarantined if they test positive for the virus. Newman Transit will be restoring regular service on all routes starting on this date. A few changes will continue to be in effect, even after regular life has been restored back to normal: -wearing a mask or other face covering will be mandatory -wherever possible, the front door area will continue to be barricaded off -all request stops will continue to be serviced by all vehicles at all times -all doors will open at all stops, and all vehicles will be disinfected upon arrival at the yard
  12. Feels like it, sometimes. A Freudian slip, perhaps?
  13. A couple more reasons for cautious optimism: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/coronavirus-drug-remdesivir-shows-promise-large-trial-n1195171 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/27/world/europe/coronavirus-vaccine-update-oxford.html
  14. Some cautiously optimistic news, suggesting that immunity, even if not permanent, might not be as distant of a hope as some doom-and-gloomers on the internet have been suggesting: https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=https://www.n-tv.de/wissen/Drosten-Genesene-Corona-Patienten-immun-article21746354.html&prev=search https://abcnews.go.com/Health/south-korean-studies-suggest-antibodies-protect-covid-19/story?id=70312111
  15. Stops on the 90 Vaughan being nixed: http://www.ttc.ca/Service_Advisories/Service_changes/90_Bus_stop_changes.jsp
  16. Thanks for the correction, the timeline completely slipped my mind.
  17. While a valid concern, I offer the Spanish flu as a counter-argument. Did the TTC see any long term service reductions after that was over and done? I've never seen any reference made to it in any literature on the history of the TTC, so I assume not. It is difficult to imagine how long it will take for all the ridership to come back, but I'd expect at least a portion of it to bounce back relatively soon after the stay-at-home order is lifted, as people get fed up and start itching to go places again.
  18. I'm not sure what kind of rollerblading-induced injury you think would warrant calling first responders, but I'm fairly certain that the chances of something like that happening are very small. In over 15 years of playing sports, I've only ever sustained a single injury that warranted a trip to the ER, and that was more of a precautionary thing than anything, and I've never required first responders. But if that's the argument you're going for, you realize that there are ways to injure yourself from the safety of your own home, right? Besides there being home exercises that could also lead to injuries, better make sure not to cook, or clean, or do repairs, or really anything really, to be on the safe side. Why is a walk around the block fine, but anything beyond that isn't? You might run into another human being right in front of your house or apartment block. You might trip or fall. No danger is eliminated if you confine yourself to a personal bubble like this. Don't flatter yourself. I've also seen a lot of stupid behaviours since this started. I'm not sure why social distancing and exercising is one of those. I don't expect you to have a crystal ball, but like I've said on multiple occasions in this thread, there are no indications whatsoever that we are going to contain this disease in its entirety, and if that is the case, then we need to start planning for how a post-COVID world is going to look like. I can't imagine how shaming people for wanting to get fresh air or exercise is going to fit into that world. https://time.com/5805368/will-coronavirus-go-away-world-health-organization/ https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/08/health/coronavirus-stays-warmer-weather/index.html
  19. Why does this matter? If the person participating in that activity is keeping their distance from other people, what are they doing to endanger themselves or others? Then you ought to specify that the infraction should be for trespassing on private property. Let's not sit here and pretend that breaking out the pitchforks and torches every time someone steps out of their house for "non-essential reasons" (and who are you to decide that?) is helping us in the fight against the virus. I am incredibly disturbed by how willing you are to shut this argument down without a second thought. I'm sure there are very few people who don't want any rules at all. But like with anything else in life, restrictions around activities should be circumstantial. Not everything is the same. Going to a sports event, crowded concert venue, or packed airplane cannot be, in any way, compared to a family who lives together participating in physical activity outdoors while keeping their physical distance from others. Obviously, if necessary, station bylaw officers to ensure that groups of people don't come together while doing their thing. I note that you haven't addressed any of my questions about what happens in the future. Do you seriously think that this can go on for any extended period of time?
  20. So people are allowed to congregate in huge lines for grocery stores, but someone rollerblading in an empty parking lot, going for a walk without a dog, or continuing past the nearest cross street on their road, is posing a public health risk? Not everyone has the benefit of a huge yard and there seems to be a very clear consensus from health experts that exercising outside while practising social distancing is much better for everyone concerned than to be cooped up at home forever (citation) - especially since the indications are that this thing is not going to disappear any time soon, if at all. And what's going to happen when we reopen society? There are going to be far bigger generators of risk than people going for a walk. We should be coming up with policies and guidelines for how to do that safely without endangering ourselves or others, rather than assuming hat we can keep up this song and dance for much longer. Let's also not pretend that all infractions are equal. There is a world of difference between "rollerblading in an empty parking lot" and "going up to the nearest person you see and sneezing right in their face", or "throwing a huge party in the park". In addition, there seems to be growing evidence to suggest that even the action of going to a grocery store is not as significant of a risk factor as previously believed. What makes parks different, then? Assuming, of course, you're not congregating in huge groups for extended periods of time. https://today.rtl.lu/news/science-and-environment/a/1498185.html
  21. What exactly would shutting this garage down accomplish? If infected people went to the garage and spread the illness to the others, how would removing that garage from the equation prevent those workers from spreading the virus at another garage? What an absurd notion.
  22. In all honesty, I can't possibly imagine a scenario where all of our emergency measures last for anywhere close to four years. Besides the issue of the economy not being able to hold out for half a decade of this, the other thing that makes me skeptical is that the longer this will go on, the more reckless people will get. I imagine there will come a point at which most people will figure they'd rather play Russian Roulette with the virus rather than be stuck doing nothing till kingdom come. High risk, high reward, and all that. I still think it's too early... we should figure out some effective treatments, and a plan to avoid overwhelming our emergency rooms, before we face the possibility of restarting life. But it's going to have to happen eventually.
  23. I believe we now have an answer to the question of how far along this can progress before start to lose their minds: https://business.financialpost.com/executive/posthaste-coronavirus-outbreaks-could-be-with-us-until-2024-requiring-some-social-distancing-into-2022-says-harvard-study It never rains, but it pours.
  24. I think that, at the very least, it would be premature to think about re-starting normal life until antibody tests are widespread and the data from those has been collected (to see if the estimates that the virus has already made its rounds among the bulk of the population are true, and we're much further along in this thing than we thought), and we also know the nature of what immunity recovery from the virus offers. There have been a few quotes in the papers here and there suggesting that those who were asymptomatic and recovered perhaps didn't have an adequate number of antibodies, making them susceptible to re-infection (I have seen this put forward as an explanation for the alarmist news alleging that some people who had recovered from the virus were being reinfected). I really hope that's not true, but until we can ascertain whether it is, it might be best to hold off, especially if we don't know what repeated exposure to the virus could do to a person's body.
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