Jump to content

dbdb

Member
  • Content Count

    170
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by dbdb

  1. dbdb

    Poop powered bus

    $2 or 2lb per ride!
  2. dbdb

    Westjet

    I'm not sure what to make of the author. They author only seems to make two points: somewhere between 25% and 50% of the time gate agents do not enforce zone boarding and one the seatbelt light goes off, a few people who really need to take a leak make a dash for the lavatories. Both of these examples I'd cite as equivalent to asking for an extra pickle on your burger at Harvey's. Both substantially increase customer satisfaction at insignificant cost. What's worse: discretely letting the odd queue jumper pass or stopping the line to chastise and send the queue jumper embarrassingly to the back of the line? Do you demean passengers and require they ask permission to use the lavatory? Do you let some smug rule breakers feel satisfied about getting away with the extra pickle or do you instill fear and discomfort in everyone to the point where they feel the airline is being exceptionally generous to even allow them to board the flight they've paid for as some other airlines seem to do. And as for the lazy guy that put his carry-on in the bin at the front, it's quite rude but what rule is that breaking? Overhead bins aren't assigned with seats, maybe once there's a fee with the future ULCC but not now. And if WestJet ever started using both the front and back doors again, as Ask the Pilot blogger Patrick Smith suggests is common elsewhere, then this guy would have to wait until the aircraft is nearly empty to get his bag.
  3. dbdb

    Air Canada

    The -100 is quite a different animal. It's smaller, older, has a 4 blade prop instead of 6 so it's slow and noisy. The back row is like the back bench seat on a bus where the middle seat (row 10) has nothing in front but the aisle. They used to have 2 rear facing seats in row 1 which were incredibly uncomfortable during takeoff but I think that's been reconfigured. There are no great window seats due to the engine nacelles and propellers obstructing much of the view. Overhead bin space is very limited, most carry on bags end up being placed in the rear cargo compartment at boarding and you collect them on a cart as you exit the aircraft. It's a perfectly adequate aircraft for a short flight (under ~300km), on longer flights you'll start to feel more like cargo than a passenger. The -100 and -300 are comparable for comfort and speed with size being the main differentiation. The Q400's are much nicer in all respects. Official Air Canada info here: https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/fly/onboard/fleet.html
  4. dbdb

    Canada Jetlines planning to start operations

    And a model plane isn't even among the merch.
  5. dbdb

    Canadian Rail Accidents

    The article the trains will run Toronto to/from London but not through to/from Sarnia.
  6. dbdb

    Union Pacific fleet

    Maybe dig around in their annual reports. Maybe there's mention of it as capital assets.
  7. dbdb

    Saskatoon Updates

    Yes, 3, the U of S - Broadway (Avalon) - U of S portion of the route is only 30-ish minutes.
  8. dbdb

    Westjet

    If schedule is the determinant then my money is on the 787, either -8's or -9's that can be manufactured in Everett. South Carolina doesn't build the -8's and the -10's are only built there and their production rate is about 1/2 that in Everett. I don't think Boeing has had a new -8 order in a couple years so it should be a lot easier to find production slots for a -8 or a -9. If price is the determinant then without question the A330ceo is most likely.
  9. dbdb

    Air Canada

    The 300's and 100's are basically the same experience except for the size. The Q400's are newer, have some technological improvements to make them a bit quieter and use 6 blade propellers instead of 4 so they're quieter and faster. Air Canada Fleet
  10. dbdb

    Air Canada

    AC and it's regionals have been flying the Dash-8s for a long time. They're old, slow, loud, vibrate like hell but I'd still take one over a CRJ. Assuming they still have aft facing seats in the front row, starboard side, avoid them, it's really hard on your back on takeoff.
  11. dbdb

    Robot Co-Pilots

    I am serious and don't call me Shirley.
  12. dbdb

    Robot Co-Pilots

    Is it me or is this the first thing that come to mind: But seriously, that whole article basically describes existing cockpit automation. Here's to companies reinventing the wheel in industries they know nothing about.
  13. dbdb

    Westjet

    I forget the exact load factor number but they were claiming break even was some number under 50%. I also assume that was an average over their routes. Obviously costs would vary with airport and possibly weight/passenger count/time of day depending on the airport. Well, Google was my friend and I found Porter trumpets their break even load factor at 49% in a number of news releases. Here's an example: https://www.flyporter.com/About/News-Release-Details?title=Porter+Airlines+October+load+factor+grows+4.7+points+2010+11
  14. dbdb

    Westjet

    Which basically means they're gushing cash. I read something a few years ago about what the typical break even load factor was and while Porter didn't release their actual load but instead provided a number they claim in their break-even. If that's correct then any load factor similar to WestJet or Air Canada aggregate load factors that would mean they're making a lot of money.
  15. dbdb

    Westjet

    One of my point is WestJet favors fleet commonality. When they ordered the first -700s and -600s they could have chosen to order 717's which probably would have been a better functional fit for the missions the -600s were intended but opted for the efficiency of a common fleet. The economics of the Q400s is totally different but they could have gone with the ATR 42/72 mix if they wanted aircraft tailored for specific missions but the economics, at least for Porter still works with mostly empty planes unlike a jet that needs to be mostly full to make a profit. Similarly I expect they'll settle on one of either model, either the 777 or 787 but not both. If they ordered today, I could see them going with the 777 because it would be cheap and is mature with no teething pains. By the time they order, the 787 will probably be fairly mature and low risk while the 777X will be newer so it will be more expensive and will have more new aircraft problems. Maybe way down the road they'd look at 777s once they're more established on overseas and have the traffic to need the size but right now my bet is on the 787 family.
  16. dbdb

    Westjet

    That sounds like my kind of in flight entertainment! Regarding wide bodies for WestJet, either but not both strikes me as more likely. Considering they don't even have 737-900's that could add capacity to existing busy routes would suggest perhaps the philosophy is to add capacity by adding frequency. Taking that philosophy and avoiding many different types and some size/range options in either 777 or 787, I don't see a good reason to do both. The Q400 investment on the Encore side says efficiency may be a priority. On the 777 front, Boeing still seems to be offering some good deals ahead of the 777X but being the end of production and deliveries over a long period or lots of sequential orders means they couldn't standardize on one aircraft. I think the 777X is too new so there are risks and higher purchase prices to consider. The 787 is maturing, they're pretty efficient, will have at least 3 different sizes, new enough they could put in an order for the same aircraft to be delivered over a decade or more, list prices are cheap and -9s and -10's can be built in a plant with lower labor costs so Boeing might have more room to wiggle on price to keep an all Boeing customer, all Boeing. Possibly with orders for the -8's coming in slow there may even be some opportunity to get a deal just to keep the delivery slots full in Everett.
  17. dbdb

    Saskatoon Updates

    https://cptdb.ca/wiki/index.php/Saskatoon_Transit_101-120
  18. dbdb

    Calgary Transit CTrain Service Disruptions

    Cutting wouldn't warp although theoretically if it was heated up sufficiently trying to cut it, it could deform although I'd say it would be unlikely or at least not significant. If the metal were bent and then bent back without tempering then it would be more brittle, that would be the reason not to repair a bent frame. I can think of structures where that would be useful but I'm not sure that would be a design approach for an LRV frame. Maybe a crown that flexes under load but I'm not sure I'd put it under stress or strain that would warp the structure for a frame but maybe we're using different meanings for "warped". I see smallspy also explained the same idea around loading. If the load is removed, the material may return to it's original shape but not warp. Now, if it was designed for say and evenly distributed load and instead most of the load was places in say one corner or vice versa then certainly I could see warping occurring. That may not be unreasonable, especially with the much more complex frame structure of a low floor bus. Just bending it back would make the frame more brittle while patching it could create new weak points. Sometimes a seemingly benign change from the original plan can have catastrophic consequences. The Hyatt Regency walkway collapse is a great example where the engineered design wasn't followed and a catastrophic failure occurred.
  19. dbdb

    Flair Air

    It would be interesting to see but I doubt we will.
  20. dbdb

    Flair Air

    It can make sense for NewLeaf since they are effectively chartering it's likely they don't have a fixed cost whether they fly or not. In contrast, a conventional airline may be paying a lease or have capital investment in their aircraft. In between, you get an airline like Delta with a lot of older aircraft that don't cost much to have around but provide additional capacity when needed.
  21. dbdb

    Flair Air

    Mixed messages coming from NewLeaf. In an interview, Jim Young claims it's because that's the slow time for leisure travel and they don't want to fly aircraft with only 30 passengers. See the video here: http://globalnews.ca/news/2945851/newleaf-temporarily-suspends-flights-out-of-regina-and-saskatoon/
  22. dbdb

    CTrain - S200 (series 9) cars

    I can see a use case both ways. Obviously a state where the doors are open and the train is moving while carrying passengers is bad, there is probably a use case, as D40LF points out to override some sort of interlock to run out of service. What's worse, a train stuck on the tracks that won't move because of a broken or malfunctioning door or the risk of human error in an exceptional circumstance or the cost or designing for all possible scenarios including the extremely unlikely ones and re-designing/retro-fitting after other scenarios occur? That's the challenge for designers/engineers.
  23. dbdb

    CTrain - S200 (series 9) cars

    Ah, that certainly shouldn't happen and worthy of a close look at the design. Definitely different than the incident in the article I linked to.
  24. dbdb

    CTrain - S200 (series 9) cars

    I found an article on it. Apparently the doors only opened a few cm while the train was emergency braking, not fully open while moving. The article explained the train lost communication and went into emergency braking and because the doors are designed to deal with things stuck in them the door moved a bit due to the momentum during braking. The article said it was within the intended design limits. Not quite the same as the doors fully opening. Passengers trying to pry doors open seems to be a more common problem. http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/2014/04/23/translink-investigates-open-skytrain-door
  25. dbdb

    CTrain - S200 (series 9) cars

    From a pure technology perspective there are plenty of ways to autonomously know or sense where the platform and different levels of automation or information to an operator. Automation could remove the operator altogether, it's probably just cheaper to train and pay operators than go with automation. It's just a matter of whether it's a priority and whether the benefit is worth the cost, ie if the risk justifies the cost to mitigate. If the risk is low, it's a lot cheaper to add a bullet point to a training manual than design, build, integrate and test a new control system.
×