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  1. New L20 has now been in service for over a month. Ladder 20 - (300997) 2020 KME Predator Severe Service LFD (1050/400/103' Aerial Cat rear-mount) A6 is now running an ex Squad. Air 6 - (300662) 2001 Ford F-550 / SVI (250/200/30F) (Ex-Squad 28) Ex A6 (300628) 1996 KME Renegade MFD (GSO#2551) (Ex-Rescue 90, 25, 16, 2, 11, 1) May be assigned to Support 23 or revert to Rescue 90.
  2. Hamilton police investigating crash involving HSR bus Fallon Hewitt By Fallon Hewitt Spectator Reporter Tue., June 16, 2020 Hamilton police say they are investigating a collision between a pickup truck and a city bus that happened early Tuesday morning. Hamilton police say they are investigating a collision between a pickup truck and a city bus that happened early Tuesday morning. Const. Jerome Stewart with the Hamilton Police Service said officers were called to the scene of a crash involving a black truck and a HSR bus at the intersection of Main Street East and John Street South just before 8:30 a.m. The Hamilton Spectator was on scene and witnessed a small pickup truck with extensive damage to its passenger side and cargo bed. Stewart was unable to confirm if any passengers were on the bus but said one person was treated for “minor injuries.” “The investigation will be ongoing to determine if any charges will be laid,” said Stewart. According to the police’s Twitter, the intersection was closed for approximately two hours and reopened shortly after 10:30 a.m. https://www.thespec.com/news/hamilton-region/2020/06/16/hamilton-police-investigating-crash-involving-hsr-bus.html
  3. I can't see the 300 number on your picture but it may have had extra equipment put on it and became E41.
  4. It will most likely go to replace the oldest or highest millage Engine in the fleet. That Engine will go to become a spare Engine. They need more full size spare Engines with a similar layout. Engine 5 – 2011 Engine 3 – 2006 Engine 17 – 2006 Engine 4 – 2008 Engine 7 – 2008 Engine 11 – 2008 Engine 21 – 2008 Engine 24 – 2008 Engine 1 – 2014 Engine 2 – 2014 Engine 8 – 2017 Engine 12 – 2017 Engine 23 – 2017 Spares Engine 45 – 2006 – part of the original 3 Engine purchased. Engine 41 – 2003 – not part of the original Engine class of pumpers. Modified to have the extra equipment the Engines hold. My money would be on E3 or E17. E11 is also busy and may have high millage.
  5. Waterdown’s growth, ‘increased risk profile’ spark need for second fire station New Waterdown station to come with 15 firefighters and two trucks 04 February 2020 - 06:28 AM by Saira Peesker Special to the Flamborough Review Hamilton city council has approved $8 million to build a second Waterdown fire station and purchase two new fire trucks. It is also looking at hiring five more firefighters for the town's existing station. The money for the station and trucks was allocated in the city's 2020 capital budget, which was finalized late last year. Now, as the city works through operating budget deliberations, council will decide whether to approve a requested Waterdown-based day crew of five new firefighters to help fill the needs of the growing community as it waits for the new station. Hamilton Fire Department deputy chief John Verbeek says the rapid pace of development and population growth in the area has put extra pressure on Station 24, the existing Waterdown station on Parkside Drive. Firefighters there — a mix of about 20 paid employees and 25 volunteers — cover a vast rural area outside the town as well. "At the time of amalgamation, when you think about Waterdown, it was a suburban, rural-type community," Verbeek told the Review. "It's become much more of an urban-suburban community. There's not only residential, but industry is starting to move near Highway 5 and Highway 6 … The risk profile for that community has significantly changed." Verbeek says the prevalence of townhouses and other multi-unit dwellings means more risk of fires spreading between units. Further, he said, newly constructed homes tend to use more lightweight materials than the homes of the past, particularly for roof trusses and floor joists. "That type of material tends to burn hotter and faster. Now we've got more of a risk of a collapse." The station's location has yet to be determined, according to assistant deputy chief Shawn De Jager. "Currently we are working with stakeholders to begin the process of defining the station requirements/concept and determining the location," he said in an email. "It is expected that this work should be completed by the fourth quarter of this year." Verbeek noted that stakeholders currently being consulted are internal; he expects a public input process will be launched once more details are available. Coun. Judi Partridge, who represents the area on Hamilton city council, said one of many locations being considered is on the Waterdown bypass, east of Centre Road. "We've been having meetings and discussions for years and looking at potential locations," she said in an interview Jan. 31, adding, "One of the driving factors behind it is to utilize city-owned property." The fire department's 10-year service plan, published last year, envisioned a land purchase for the station in 2019. It forecast the design and build phase for 2020 to 2022, and 15 full-time-equivalent positions hired for the new station in 2022. Verbeek said that while the timeline is slightly delayed from when it was devised more than a year ago, things are moving along relatively on course. According to that document, the existing Waterdown station "has on average 1.96 calls per day. This represents a 5.2 per cent annual increase over the last five years, or 22 per cent increase in 2018 when compared to 2014. Analysis of data for (calls that require four trucks, such as structure fires) reveals an average of 8.6 ... calls per year, which has doubled in the last two years." The plan suggests a goal of 10 minutes and 54 seconds from the phone call to the arrival of all four trucks. The current response time for a four-truck unit, known as an Effective Firefighting and Rescue Force (EFRF), in Waterdown is 18 minutes and 46 seconds. "Given the transition to an urban area and the increased risk profile there is a need to improve the EFRF response time in Waterdown." https://www.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/9841335-waterdown-s-growth-increased-risk-profile-spark-need-for-second-fire-station/
  6. Hamilton Fire Department 2020 Equipment Budget Request Annual Equipment Replacement $592,000 Waterdown New “Station 31”, $4,200,000 Annual Vehicle Replacement $4,305,000 New Hazmat Foam Response Apparatus $550.000 New Nature Trail Response Apparatus $150,000 In 2020 HFD plans to purchase: 1 (one) Rural Pumper and 2 (two) Aerial devices to replace 3 (three) existing similar 20 (twenty) year old fire apparatus, and 6 (six) support vehicles to replace existing 10 year old (+) support vehicles. HFD will acquire response apparatus to transport and supply firefighting foam to respond to hazardous materials incidents. An off-road vehicle equipped with a pump and capable of carrying a stretchered patient off a trail would assist firefighters in extinguishing small fires on the trail system and performing a rescue in a timely manner.
  7. In this years (2020) HSR budget. Renaming the MacNab Terminal $37,000 Replace the existing signage at the MacNab Terminal with signage that reads the "Frank Cooke Transit Terminal".
  8. Engine 3 is back in service. I could not see it's 300 number, but it looks like it had a complete paint job. Hamilton usually sends most apparatus in for refurbishing, painting and upgrades around the 10 to 12 year period.
  9. Hamilton to study opting out of Metrolinx's transit procurement program Sep 09, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News Stoney Creek Coun. Brad Clark says that Hamilton may have to put the brakes on the city participating in Metrolinx’s purchasing program for buses and other transit vehicles. Clark, who last month asked city staff to review Hamilton’s involvement in Metrolinx’s Transit Procurement Initiative, said the city may be seeing an unexpected rise in the price tag to buy buses rather than saving money for its residents. “We experienced a 30 per cent increase in the cost of buses purchased through the (procurement program) through Metrolinx when that program is supposed to be saving us money,” said Clark. “You can’t end up pushing us into something that ends up costing our taxpayers.” Clark said a few of the buses that Hamilton did purchase had faulty air conditioning systems. Nitish Bissonauth, Metrolinx spokesperson, disputes the councillor’s statement, saying that HSR has a “unique bus fleet operation” and is the only transit agency in Ontario that has recently purchased compressed natural gas buses. “CNG buses are in limited supply with only two bus suppliers in the market,” he stated. “HSR did not pay more for their purchase. The decision to purchase these buses was made years ago by Hamilton city council.” In 2014 and 2017, Hamilton purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas buses. Bissonauth said the air conditioning issue in some of the buses “has been resolved” by retrofitting “by the original equipment manager of the buses.” Hamilton has been involved in Metrolinx’s procurement program since 2008, when it joined with eight other municipalities to buy 12-metre diesel low-floor vehicles. Two years later Hamilton purchased additional 12-metre diesel low-floor buses along with Barrier, Durham, London, North Bay, St. Catharines and Welland transit agencies. Hamilton also bought an eight-metre diesel specialized low-floor vehicle in 2012, and then in 2014 Hamilton purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas low-floor buses. In 2016, Hamilton bought minibuses and the following year it purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas low-floor vehicles. The procurement program was created by Metrolinx in 2006 that involved a consortium of six agencies — Barrie, York Region, Durham Region, Burlington, London and Transit Windsor, which later dropped out of the program — to purchase 12-metre low-floor vehicles. They were delivered in 2007 and 2008. The program, stated Metrolinx on its website, “has been one of North America’s most innovative transit procurement programs.” “Metrolinx is able to negotiate reduced prices by purchasing in bulk and those savings are passed on to municipalities that voluntarily choose to use the program,” said Bissonauth. Over the last 13 years, the program has worked with 49 provincial transit agencies — saving taxpayers about $25.9 million in purchasing and administration costs since March 31, 2018 to buy 1,769 buses, said Bissonauth. Hamilton, though, has not made a bus purchase under the current 2017 to 2020 contract, he said. He pointed out that in Metrolinx’s 2018-2019 annual report to be published in September, transit agency satisfaction with the procurement program is 93.2 per cent. Under the city’s 10-year transit strategy, which was initiated in 2015, the city purchased 25 new buses at a cost of $15.6 million. In the 2019 budget that was approved by councillors earlier this spring, 30 new buses were projected to be bought. By the end of 2018, HSR had 263 buses, with the projection to increase the fleet to 347 to service the city’s BLAST network. The goal of the strategy is to spend $30 million for 45 buses, which the city has identified funding areas for the purchase. There is also a plan to buy another 81 buses for $56 million, but there is no money identified for the purchase, according to the plan. City transit staff will be reviewing Clark’s request, which was approved by council, with a report expected sometime in the fall to review the benefits and “deficiencies” of participating in Metrolinx’s program. https://www.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/9587623-hamilton-to-study-opting-out-of-metrolinx-s-transit-procurement-program/
  10. Hamilton to study opting out of Metrolinx's transit procurement program Sep 09, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News Stoney Creek Coun. Brad Clark says that Hamilton may have to put the brakes on the city participating in Metrolinx’s purchasing program for buses and other transit vehicles. Clark, who last month asked city staff to review Hamilton’s involvement in Metrolinx’s Transit Procurement Initiative, said the city may be seeing an unexpected rise in the price tag to buy buses rather than saving money for its residents. “We experienced a 30 per cent increase in the cost of buses purchased through the (procurement program) through Metrolinx when that program is supposed to be saving us money,” said Clark. “You can’t end up pushing us into something that ends up costing our taxpayers.” Clark said a few of the buses that Hamilton did purchase had faulty air conditioning systems. Nitish Bissonauth, Metrolinx spokesperson, disputes the councillor’s statement, saying that HSR has a “unique bus fleet operation” and is the only transit agency in Ontario that has recently purchased compressed natural gas buses. “CNG buses are in limited supply with only two bus suppliers in the market,” he stated. “HSR did not pay more for their purchase. The decision to purchase these buses was made years ago by Hamilton city council.” In 2014 and 2017, Hamilton purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas buses. Bissonauth said the air conditioning issue in some of the buses “has been resolved” by retrofitting “by the original equipment manager of the buses.” Hamilton has been involved in Metrolinx’s procurement program since 2008, when it joined with eight other municipalities to buy 12-metre diesel low-floor vehicles. Two years later Hamilton purchased additional 12-metre diesel low-floor buses along with Barrier, Durham, London, North Bay, St. Catharines and Welland transit agencies. Hamilton also bought an eight-metre diesel specialized low-floor vehicle in 2012, and then in 2014 Hamilton purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas low-floor buses. In 2016, Hamilton bought minibuses and the following year it purchased 12-metre compressed natural gas low-floor vehicles. The procurement program was created by Metrolinx in 2006 that involved a consortium of six agencies — Barrie, York Region, Durham Region, Burlington, London and Transit Windsor, which later dropped out of the program — to purchase 12-metre low-floor vehicles. They were delivered in 2007 and 2008. The program, stated Metrolinx on its website, “has been one of North America’s most innovative transit procurement programs.” “Metrolinx is able to negotiate reduced prices by purchasing in bulk and those savings are passed on to municipalities that voluntarily choose to use the program,” said Bissonauth. Over the last 13 years, the program has worked with 49 provincial transit agencies — saving taxpayers about $25.9 million in purchasing and administration costs since March 31, 2018 to buy 1,769 buses, said Bissonauth. Hamilton, though, has not made a bus purchase under the current 2017 to 2020 contract, he said. He pointed out that in Metrolinx’s 2018-2019 annual report to be published in September, transit agency satisfaction with the procurement program is 93.2 per cent. Under the city’s 10-year transit strategy, which was initiated in 2015, the city purchased 25 new buses at a cost of $15.6 million. In the 2019 budget that was approved by councillors earlier this spring, 30 new buses were projected to be bought. By the end of 2018, HSR had 263 buses, with the projection to increase the fleet to 347 to service the city’s BLAST network. The goal of the strategy is to spend $30 million for 45 buses, which the city has identified funding areas for the purchase. There is also a plan to buy another 81 buses for $56 million, but there is no money identified for the purchase, according to the plan. City transit staff will be reviewing Clark’s request, which was approved by council, with a report expected sometime in the fall to review the benefits and “deficiencies” of participating in Metrolinx’s program. https://www.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/9587623-hamilton-to-study-opting-out-of-metrolinx-s-transit-procurement-program/
  11. I personally felt that lighting should have been: Police - Red and Blue EMS - Red and White Fire - Red
  12. That will be all of the pre-amalgamation regional apparatus replaced from active service. There will only spare pre-amalgamation apparatus left for a few years. Pump 27 was the last to be delivered just before amalgamation.
  13. That is new Pump 9. L9 to L5 The rescue's will be R18 R19 R28 A spare rescue is being converted to Air 6 (A6) PC1, DC2, DC3 and spare DC vehicle are being replaced in 2020 with 4 door long box pick-ups.
  14. Saw Rescue 19 (R19) doing training at station 19 this evening.
  15. The only vehicle fire around that time. HamOnt Fire Dept @HFD_Incidents·Aug 17 NEW | F19029979 | VEHICLE FIRE | Loc: HAM @ UPPER WENTWORTH ST/KINGFISHER DR | Units: E2 | 08/17/19 15:26 Plus a few minutes latter. HamOnt Fire Dept @HFD_Incidents·Aug 17 UPDATE | F19029979 | Units: E2, L4
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