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Tcmetro

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  1. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    This article that was linked to on the Urban MSP forums says the B and D lines will use electric buses. https://minnesotareformer.com/briefs/legislature-will-fund-two-new-rapid-bus-lines-along-twin-cities-busiest-corridors/
  2. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    Northtown Transit Center not moving to the Sanburnol Dr site, but could move somewhere else on the mall property. https://www.hometownsource.com/abc_newspapers/community/blaine/northtown-transit-center-not-moving-near-sanburnol-neighborhood/article_60335212-fdff-11ea-9b67-736647dcfc7c.html Orange Line construction update from September: https://www.35wsolutions.com/get_doc.php?file=2020 09 10 35W Solutions Alliance.pdf
  3. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    Metro Transit is planning to take over the Red Line on Dec 5th 2020. There will be no impact to service levels. There are a few reasons for this change: Metropolitan Council has been funding the Red Line 100% since 2018. From 2013 to 2018, the funding was 50% provided by the Metropolitan Council and 50% by Dakota County through the Counties Transit Improvement Board. The Red Line is contracted to MVTA, who then subcontracts service to Schmitty and Sons. The station management is also contracted to MVTA and then subcontracted to other firms. Metropolitan Council says that operations of both service and facilities through Metro Transit will save on costs. MVTA has requested additional police presence on the Red Line. Metropolitan Council believes that operations by Metro Transit will make easier/better integration with the Metro Transit Police. Operational efficiencies will be had by integrating Red Line operations with the other METRO bus lines. A new bus fleet will arrive soon for the Red Line. I assume this means that the Red Line buses will be interchangeable with other METRO buses. (Side note - wonder what happens to the oddball Nova LFS buses?) Due to reduced Metro Transit services, MT now has driver availability to run the Red Line. MVTA has been opposed to this change. They contend that they can reduce operating costs, but also that the Red Line serves as a local route and does not meet the definition of bus rapid transit (I am assuming because the frequencies are only every 20 minutes on weekdays and every 30 minutes on weekends). MVTA also says this will take jobs away from their contractor, Schmitty and Sons. Some discussion in the Sept 30th 2020 MVTA meeting packet: https://www.mvta.com/cms-files/september_30_board_packet.k.pdf Metro Transit/Met Council gave an update to the Dakota County Regional Railroad Authority on Sept 22nd (video starts after the 20 minute mark) : https://dakota.granicus.com/player/clip/902?
  4. https://www.rtcsnv.com/ways-to-travel/schedules-maps/2020-transit-service-change/?utm_source=shortURL&utm_medium=rtcsnv&utm_campaign=service_change_2020 RTC changes approved for Oct. 4th: Strip and Downtown Express eliminated Westcliff-Airport Express eliminated 104, Deuce, Centennial Express, Henderson-Downtown Express, Sahara Express rerouted New 401 to service downtown areas covered by Strip and Downtown Express 122 frequency decrease 207 and 209 eliminated weekend service
  5. RTC is considering some service cuts, including the elimination of the Strip & Downtown Express line, which could mean the Wrightbuses will be made redundant. https://www.rtcsnv.com/ways-to-travel/schedules-maps/2020-transit-service-change/?utm_source=home_page_banner&utm_medium=rtcsnv&utm_campaign=service_change_2020
  6. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    Page 36 of the upcoming SW Transit Commission meeting packet says that Metropolitan Council is evaluating bus replacement plans to potentially defer purchases if peak fleet needs fall. I think this could have interesting implications for Metro Transit by allowing them to further/better analyze purchasing electric buses, given the trouble with the C Line electrics over the past winter. https://swtransit.org/cms-files/6-25-20-commission-packet.pdf
  7. I dug through the board meeting materials from February and March and it looks like there's 20 XN40s and 40 Enviro 500s on order. Wikipedia claims there's 13 2007 and 40 2008 Enviro 500s in service, so I suppose these new orders will be their replacements. Wikipedia also has a link to an article stating RTC received a grant for 2 hydrogen fuel cell buses, which would be delivered in 2022. https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/rtc-using-3-8m-federal-grant-for-2-hydrogen-powered-buses/ The same article says that RTC wants to transition to CNG by 2023. The Wrightbus fleet is hitting the 11-12 year mark now, so I would imagine that they are planning to replace those soon. Also looks like the Wrightbuses got a new AC system recently. https://m.metro-magazine.com/news/732853/ccw-redesigns-hvac-system-for-rtc-of-southern-nevada-buses
  8. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    I was able to dig up a little more on the RTB - it was created in 1984. Here's the note on the makeup of the board: 11 members (8 members appointed by the Metropolitan Council, 1 from each metropolitan agency district, 6 of whom are to be elected city, town, or county officials; 3 members appointed by the governor, including a chair, 1 person age 65 or older, and 1 person with a disability); appointed by governor, Metropolitan Council; 4-year terms; per diem and expenses; members file with Ethical Practices Board.; 14 members (1 appointed by governor). (as of 1984) Here's the links for more reading: https://www.leg.state.mn.us/lrl/agencies/detail?AgencyID=1371 http://www2.mnhs.org/library/findaids/gr00247.xml The development of the first light rail line in Minnesota was championed by Jesse Ventura, the ex-wrestler who became Minnesota's Independent governor in 1999. Decades of talk went somewhere when someone with political power wanted to get it done. The regional aspect of it is really important, in my opinion. Most new systems have been developed by regional government bodies that have some kind of taxing power. Getting the regional buy-in gets a lot more revenue, political support across the region instead of just from the big city, and opportunity to connect city to major suburban commercial and employment centers.
  9. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    Another RTB note: I believe that the first contract routes were in the late 80s, and connected the south of the river suburbs and were run by Airport Express. I believe RTB was responsible for contracted routes.
  10. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    RTB was the "Regional Transit Board". It's been a while since I've read up on it (there's a good amount of material in the downtown Minneapolis library stacks). From what I remember, Metropolitan Transit Commission (MTC) was created in 1967 to handle public transportation planning, while the Metropolitan Council was created to handle urban planning. MTC commissioned a subway plan for the Twin Cities in 1968. MTC was also responsible for taking over private bus lines. The main bus service, Twin Cities Lines, was taken over in 1970. Various suburban operations were acquired over time, I think the last ones still operating (but receiving public subsidies) were Medicine Lake Lines and Lorenz/North Suburban Lines c. 1999/2000. Metropolitan Council during the early 1970s advocated a busway system, as it felt rail was unnecessary. MTC planned for downtown elevated transit lines in the 1970s (similar to Miami MetroMover or Detroit People Mover) that would be the start of a regional automated rail system. The problem was that MTC and Metropolitan Council were both doing transit planning and couldn't agree. In 1975, rail transit planning was banned by the state. The ban was lifted in 1980. I believe that in 1980 (could be wrong here) that the state authorized the creation of the county regional railroad authorities. These authorities would be allowed to purchase ROWs and plan for rail transit. These still exist, although much more limited now, and to my knowledge were created in Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, and Washington Counties. These regional railroad authorities planned light rail lines all over the metro. The problem they had was that there wasn't any coordination between them. The answer was the RTB. I believe the RTB was created in 1984 or 1986 when opt-out transit providers were authorized. RTB was responsible for coordinating transit planning and passing federal transit dollars to the MTC and the opt-outs. Ultimately, none of the rail plans developed by the regional railroad authorities and the RTB went anywhere. By the 1990s, MTC had public accountability issues. From old articles I read, it sounded like there was a lot of management issues. In 1994, the Legislature merged MTC and RTB into the Metropolitan Council. Metropolitan Council took over other regional functions including tax sharing, the regional water and sewer system, and public housing responsibilities in areas that did not already have public housing agencies. MTC was renamed Metropolitan Council Transit Operations in 1994 during the takeover. MCTO was rebranded to Metro Transit in 1997. The current transit planning process now is that the regional railroad authorities initiate rail and BRT planning and hand projects over to the Metropolitan Council once an alignment is identified. So far, the Hiawatha (Blue), Central (Green), Southwest (Green ext.), Bottineau (Blue ext.), Cedar (Red BRT), Gateway (Gold BRT) have been handled this way. Rush Line, Riverview Corridor, Hwy 36, Robert St (not currently progressing), Northeast Corridor (not currently progressing), Red Rock (not currently progressing), Orange extension (not currently progressing) are all studies that have been done by regional railroad authorities since 2000. The Orange Line BRT came about from a MNDOT study in 2005. Metro Transit has jointly developed that project with the Hennepin and Dakota County railroad authorities.
  11. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    CJ, Mel Bernero has a lot of old photos of MTC/MCTO/Metro Transit as well as suburban operators on Flickr. There's a few Americana's in here as well https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbernero/albums/72157629417268712 I liked the Americana's a lot, I remember there was a divider in the front staircase to separate boarding and exiting passengers. HP, Thank you for sharing the MTS fleet list. Good to see the DAR and the Metro Mobility breakdown too!
  12. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    A pic of an Americana popped up in the Winnipeg thread:
  13. According to this, the Greyhound station in Chicago at Clark and Randolph closed in 1989. https://cardboardamerica.org/2016/11/16/greyhound-bus- Greyhound sold off the old terminal to a developer in 1987: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1988-06-10-8801060422-story.html Looks like the one at Harrison and Desplaines opened soon after. Here's a Chicago Tribune article from 1990 about it: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1990-03-25-9001250556-story.html
  14. Tcmetro

    Metro Transit

    I seem to recall taking a Metro Transit (MVTA liveried) D60 on the 460 or 465 lines back in 2006 when I moved from Minneapolis to the south suburbs. I think the Metro Transit contract with MVTA ended that year, likely because MVTA finally had enough of their own equipment to operate their schedule. That 9841 bus is interesting. Any idea on the model?
  15. There's a few other intra-metro trips that can only be done by Greyhound. Until recently, Dallas to Ft Worth on Sundays had to be done by Greyhound (now the DART orange line connects to the TEX train at the airport). Tampa to St Pete on weekends is also only doable by Greyhound, although there is a ferry part of the year. Greyhound also does the Mt Laurel NJ - NYC commute run.
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