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Urban Sky

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  1. None of the three definitions provided by the Oxford Dictionary for the word "stupid" seem to accommodate such a use: showing a lack of thought or good judgment (disapproving) (of a person) slow to learn or understand things; not intelligent [only before noun] (informal) used to emphasize that you are annoyed with someone or something On a lighter note, the top definition in the "Urban Dictionary" is: Guess the joke is on me... 😉 No worries, I get what you mean and I suspect that we are both perceiving each other's comments much more confrontational than how we actually meant them. It is unfortunately a lot of manual work to compile the actual timings for even one single station from the data I downloaded from ReserVIA, but a friend and fellow passenger rail enthusiast has sent me his spreadsheet with the actual departure times from almost every station and for a much longer period than what I have recorded myself, so do you have any suggestions of which stations I should add to provide a more complete (but still digestible) picture?
  2. Rest assured that just because I don't "obsessively watch the live train tracking", I'm still fairly aware of how OTP is on the Canadian since I download and analyze the data regularly. Also, as you noticed yourself, my table included a column for Winnipeg and (for departures in February 2019 or later also) Jasper, which I would consider reasonably representative for the other intermediary stations... But if you rather insist on anecdotal experiences: During my first trip with the Canadian, Train 1 departed Toronto on May 28, 2015 on-time, accummulated 5 hours of delay even before it reached Washago, which increased to 14 hours by the time we hit Sioux Lookout. We arrived at Jasper 12 hours late (thus at 1am rather than 1pm). Two-and-a-half days later, we boarded the train 1 again with a 22 hours delay and arrived Vancouver with basically the same delay. During my second trip with the Canadian, Train 2 departed Vancouver 8 minutes late on April 26, 2019 (thus the last eastbound departure with the 2018/2019 timings) and we accumulated 4 hours of delay between Kamloops and Blue River and another hour before Jasper. Our delay peaked at 6.5 hours (out of Portage-la-Prairie), but we continuously made up delays afterwards and arrived in Toronto 18 minutes late. If I revisit the data I've presented for the Canadian, I'm inclined to say that my first trip was rather typical for operations under the pre-2018 schedule, whereas my second trip was pretty representative for the 2018/2019 schedule and I hope I'll be able to make a trip under the post-2019 at some point... I don't know why you are so resentful about the amount of padding (unless you actually resent the need for doing so, in absence of any influence on dispatching priorities), but it is a necessity to ensure that trains no longer arrive ridiculously late (e.g. 10+ hours) on a regular basis. Spreading out the padding evenly might appear intuitively as the better option, but unfortunately, a train can't leave any (major) station early and therefore any unnecessary padding cannot be "saved" to offset delays caused later down the (rail)road. This is why it makes most sense to place the majority of the padding at the end of the journey. Therefore, the padding is by no means "stupid", but a necessity to avoid that Sleeper passengers book onward transportation (especially difficult-to-cancel-or-modify ones like flights or cruises) with a time buffer which would still be generous for the kind of rail operations they are used to from their own countries. For the records, I responded to a post which was asking about the punctuality of RMR and therefore tried to clarify the current state of delays on the Canadian as I sensed that the person asking the question was not aware that 24+ hour delays are (thank god) no longer a regular occurrence. I'm therefore inclined to say that OTP has increased dramatically over the last 2 years and that this should have reduced the inconveniences posed on Sleeper passengers dramatically. Yes, even the now significantly reduced delays are still much less acceptable for Economy travelers than Sleeper passengers, but the current OTP gives them still a much larger uncertainty [Edit: certainty] about what time of the day their train will arrive or depart. And again: please keep in mind that my comment was referring to the Canadian in the context of Tourism (which rarely travel from/to any other station than those my table listed, plus probably Edmonton), not intercity travel (where the timings at the intermediary stations are of course much more important)... My understanding is that these capacity-enhancing infrastructure upgrades are still on-going...
  3. July 2018 and June 2019, hence the three different periods in the table. You can find my full post here: https://urbantoronto.ca/forum/threads/via-rail.21060/page-450#post-1544058
  4. What if I told you that the median arrival time of Train 2 into Toronto has been only 8 minutes late over the last year? And that of Train 1 into Vancouver over 2 hours early? I unfortunately don't have any punctuality data on the Rocky Mountaineer, but concerning the impact the choice of host railroads has on punctuality: due to the directional routing agreement between Mission/Abbotsford and Ashcroft, the choice of host railroads only matters for a rather small fraction of the Vancouver-Kamloops run and for all other of its routes, RMR doesn't have the luxury to choose between two different host railroads...
  5. I unfortunately don't know what was written here, but just to highlight that the 1990 cuts were imposed by the federal government, here their budget speech of 1989 announcing that the government would impose cuts: Source: Government of Canada (1989) To be more specific, this is the legislation which forced VIA to abandon the Canadian (and other routes, of which more are shown in separate "Schedules"): Source: Government of Canada (2020) Furthermore, the intention to privatize Crown Corporations is also mentioned in the Budget 1989 speech, which foreshadows the privatization of VIA's "Rocky Mountaineer by Daylight" [Edit: I of course meant "Canadian Rockies by Daylight" or "Rocky Mountaineer"] operation: Source: Government of Canada (1989, p.9)
  6. There is indeed only one place in this country with recent experience of maintaining RDCs and that place is located in Sudbury. Using a relatively isolated operation like Sudbury-White River is pretty much ideal for such an exotic fleet type - just like Vancouver Island was...
  7. Fun fact: https://groups.io/g/Canadian-Passenger-Rail/message/88792
  8. I’m not sure what you are alluding to, but no, the locomotive engineers and OTS are not Social Distancing across 4 locomotives...
  9. I have yet to see any car other than Prestige cars (Chateau or Park) with that charcoal stripe. As for the all the on-going refurbishment programs, I would refer to the corresponding site on VIA’s webpage: Given that the picture was apparently taken at CAD, the cars shown seem to be part of the HEP1 programme...
  10. This was before I was even born and several decades before I first set foot onto this side of the Atlantic. Nevertheless, the timetables seem to suggest that the service was initially operated by the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway and not by VIA directly (which would explain why only a few stations are shown, as the service was only shown as a connection service). Furthermore, the service was apparently supposed to be discontinued in December 1979: Nevertheless, the service didn't disappear with the June 1979 timetable, but appeared with virtually the same timings and with a dozen more stops and without any mention of the E&N Ry, which suggests that it had finally become a VIA service: Edit: this flyer dated in August 1978 (and still showing the discontinuance notice mentioned above, but crossed through with a pen) suggests that the service was operated by CP Rail, but on behalf of VIA (and with all stops listed in the June 1979 timetable plus a stop in Mud Bay): http://streamlinermemories.info/Amtrak/VIA78E&NTT.pdf Edit 2: CP's last timetable (April 1976) also suggests that they treated the service as a connection rather than one of its own services: However, earlier CP timetables (until October 1960) at least show a train number (but the train number is the same as CP's flagship "The Canadian", which suggests that the E&N used its own train numbers): The April 1950 timetable also included passenger service to Port Alberni: Finally, the oldest timetable I could find is from a April 1907 CP timetable I found on traingeek.ca: By the way, this is what Wikipedia writes about the relationship between the E&N and CP:
  11. Go to slide 11 and check the layout for car “Economy 4A” - I count 60-something seats in that cab car...
  12. Just out of interest: how many intercity passenger rail services offering checked service for luggage and/or pets can you name anywhere in the world and how many revenue seats would you be prepared to loose on every single departure (twice that if a train is formed of two trainsets), in order to create the space for offering such a service?
  13. If I recall correctly, the segments between Capreol and Gogama and Between Gogama and Elma are both considered remote by Transport Canada, but I have yet to see an official document which confirms this. Also, I have been reminded in the meanwhile that BC only joined Canada a few tears after the 1867 Confederation agreement and that it therefore only covered the construction of a railroad towards the Atlantic provinces, while the construction of the transcontinental railway was covered in a later agreement. Furthermore, none of these agreements seem to cover the obligation to maintain passenger service (as already pointed out here, in reference to the Supreme Court ruling that there is no obligation to fund VIA services between Victoria and Courtenay). Nevertheless, I’m of the impression as successive federal governments have consistently acted as if such obligation existed, with transcontinental service never cut back below twice-weekly full-scale sleeper service, linking the Atlantic (Halifax) and the Pacific (Vancouver) with the Corridor without any transfers and with providing funding for the Confederation bridge to PEI and the Trans-Canada Highway in NL as compensation for terminating passenger services to and within these provinces...
  14. It’s covered by the 1867 Confederation agreement, in which the federal government accepted the responsibility to ensure that a transcontinental passenger rail service is maintained...
  15. Maybe there is a reason why they are called “mandatory services”...?
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