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OCCheetos

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  1. For weekend closures sure, but I mean the Confederation Line has also always run reasonably well on the weekends too. The important measure is peak capacity and neither Toronto nor Montreal have lines that are built on the idea of "redundancy". They're built to support the full amount of ridership that they are required to serve. For East-West, Toronto seems to have a lot of that, but those also primarily feed into the Line 1 which doesn't have as much in comparison. But still, those streetcars exist to serve the ridership in their area, not as redundancy. Neither of those were designed with the intention of being redundancies. The Crosstown is being built to address the East-West capacity requirements of the parts of Toronto North of the streetcar zone. If the Line 2 goes down, it isn't exactly an automatic alternative unless you were commuting from way out East beyond Kennedy. The Relief line is being built to offload capacity stress from the Line 2 to Line 1 (and vice versa) transfers. It's also worth noting of course that Toronto, Montreal, and New York have populations multiple times larger than Ottawa. Looking at the transit maps for Calgary and Edmonton, which are closer to Ottawa in population, I don't see anything that jumps out at me as being a direct redundancy. My overall point is that Ottawa doesn't appear to have redundancies because frankly Ottawa's ridership doesn't demand anything close to it. Like in my original post, we technically do have "redundant" routes, but in the same way that I doubt anyone who lives near Ossington thinks of the 504 as an alternative to the Line 2, no one living in Kanata considers the 16 as an alternative to the Confederation Line. I agree with @smallspy that we should build on lower capacity corridors to expand the system, and Ottawa has at least two of those planned out, but they should be built as ridership dictates, not solely for redundancy. Whenever I see these types of comments I can't help but think that there are a lot of people who are back seat transit planners with overtones of smugness. I mean, not you! I genuinely appreciate this discussion. I'm thinking more about the kinds of comments and replies you can find on Twitter or Reddit... As it is, "redundant service" would be a waste of money since ridership doesn't require it. Meanwhile Twitter was outraged recently over the $95,000 being spent a week just to keep a few buses on standby while issues are resolved, but "real" redundant services would cost a lot more than $95,000 a week and end up benefiting fewer people overall.
  2. They had the line open from September 14th to October 6th while keeping the old bus network in place and it ran comparatively problem free.
  3. This point is kind of disingenuous though. No other system has a full redundancy set up to support the full ridership of any of their lines, it just kind of looks like it to us because we'd never have so many riders on our single line. As an example: The Route 6 in Toronto is not there as a redundancy to either side of the Line 1. A bus every 5 minutes could never support the tens of thousands of riders on the Line 1 every morning. Neither are the streetcars. They're all there to serve their own set of riders and anyone who would count on them as a guaranteed redundant backup is in for a surprise to say the least. If anyone really wanted to depend on the bus for getting downtown, they could take the 16, 9, or 12.. but there are obvious reasons why most people don't. At least Ottawa's bus system has the flexibility to immediately interline incoming routes into the R1 in the event of a service disruption.
  4. They were because of unreliability of the train, though not for constant use. They are extra buses stationed on standby to be put into replacement service as needed so that they don't need to pull buses off of regular bus trips. In the grand scheme of things, over the line's entire lifespan, it really doesn't matter so long as it is fixed in time which it does look like it will be.
  5. The last auction posting from last December noted that the Talents were no longer receiving standstill maintenance.
  6. The airport spur is being expedited to allow the airport authority to complete their upgrades to the terminal building and build the future airport station before everything launches in 2022. The spur is supposed to be complete by next year so it does look like they're making good time!
  7. Yes. Trees have also been cleared near Pinecrest and Iris.
  8. Unless my understanding of the system is wrong, it's pretty inefficient for OC Transpo's use case. It's most apparent on southbound trains at Gladstone where even after they receive a clear signal the trains have to crawl through the switch until they pass the indusi magnet. I'm sure the city's no stranger to getting regulatory approvals for this line by now. I'm guessing all the signal infrastructure will stay the same (especially with their recent upgrades around Greenboro and in Walkley yard) but this time around the underlying control and protection systems will be changed. Some of those appendices were unintentionally posted on the city's website back in around March (it was linked to on SSP) but since they are files from the project agreement and those sections were redacted from the copy of the agreement that was later published, I don't think reuploading that document would be ok. Having read it though... I'll note that it does specify upgrading the existing vehicles with the new train control system and also makes reference to controlling complex train movements in and out of South Keys station.
  9. To my understanding, the LINTs will be upgraded to support the new signalling system as part of their rebuild. From page 40 of the same report: The last response in this FAQ notes that the entire signalling system will be replaced.
  10. It's at the very bottom of Page 52 in this report.
  11. It's supposed to be replaced with some (unspecified) implementation of PTC.
  12. Primarily because it's faster and cheaper. Some parts of the work wouldn't be possible to do while the line is running so it would require periodic closures. Also it's not that difficult to replace the entire line with buses. 12 double deckers is enough to replace the entire thing from a capacity point of view if my numbers are right. Some of the work being done: Station platforms need to be rebuilt/doubled in length The trench North of Carling station needs to be widened, which involves rock blasting The Dow's Lake tunnel and bridge over the Rideau river need rehabilitation A new overpass crossing over the VIA rail tracks near Mooney's Bay is being built All passing tracks are being lengthened The LINTs will all undergo a rebuild Pedestrian underpass widening and new pedestrian tunnel rough-in at Carleton Two brand new stations at Walkley and Gladstone A culvert over the trench under the 417 to facilitate a rapid bridge replacement (was supposed to be built during the closure this past summer, but apparently wasn't?) and then the removal of said culvert Entire signalling system is being upgraded/replaced Other miscellaneous life-cycle maintenance that was moved up to be done now
  13. West of Dominion will be unchanged until you get to either Iris or Pinecrest. South of Iris buses will use Woodroffe, and West of Pinecrest buses will use the 417 with detours on other streets to get to Bayshore.
  14. In today's Transit Commission meeting it was noted that the 19 double deckers will go primarily towards providing R2 service during the Line 2 shutdown (if I'm not mistaken?) The main shutdown in the west will be when the Transitway closes between Tunney's and Dominion, but that closure is being offset to come after the Line 2 reopens so that they can reuse the resources that were being applied to the R2 service.
  15. It indicates if a door is locked out and will not open. There's another light that does the same thing on the inside on one of the panels next to every door.
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